Tag Archives: Terrorism

Technocover boxes clever with flexible build options for Critical Infrastructure security kiosks

However challenging the location, Technocover is solving asset protection issues for security and risk professionals working at Critical Infrastructure sites thanks to flexible installation options for its LPCB-approved UltraSecure security kiosks.

The physical protection specialist is offering a tailored fulfilment service for end users across its kiosk range – from small cabinets right up to extra large walk-in buildings – in order to overcome access and installation constraints.

UltraSecure kiosks can be planned and delivered as pre-built ‘plug-in’ solutions complete with M&E services for easy connection to mains electricity. They can also be supplied as part-assembled or flat pack systems to suit site logistics and the client’s project needs.

Available in a wide range of sizes and LPCB security ratings Level 3 and 4, UltraSecure cabinets and kiosks offer “rigorously tested, high durability protection” of critical processes, materials and restricted areas/zones.

Technocover's LPCB-approved UltraSecure security kiosks

Technocover’s LPCB-approved UltraSecure security kiosks

Systems can be adapted to specific operational needs from a range of accessories and options. These include single or double doors (with or without vision panels), venting louvres, roof escape hatches and internal lining (timber or recycled plastic).

They’re compatible with LPCB-approved padlocks and locking/user ID systems, entry and exit hardware and may be fully integrated with site intruder alarms and the latest access control management systems.

Comprehensive project support

Technocover’s flexible build kiosks are the latest feature of the company’s Total Service which offers comprehensive project support from surveys, risk assessment advice and early project consultation through to product design, installation and maintenance.

Total Service aims to add value to the recognised quality and benefits of Technocover’s LPCB-certificated equipment by affording high levels of technical and site support designed to identify best value solutions and subsequently maximise customer satisfaction.

Technocover’s managing director Michael Miles told Risk UK: “We’re seeing growing demand for increasingly large security kiosk modules as clients ramp up protection on Critical Infrastructure sites in a bid to defend against the risks of vandalism, theft, sabotage and potential terrorist attacks. Of course, logistics are increasingly the challenge for as well as providing flexibility in how we fulfil the security brief for large and critical structures.”

Miles concluded: “In hand with scaling up our manufacturing and delivery fleet for larger components and pre-assembled fabrications, we have the capability to readily adapt our security kiosks such that they meet the client’s precise needs whether the emphasis is on offsite or onsite assembly.”

*Technocover’s latest security installations for Critical Infrastructure projects can be viewed online at: www.technocover.co.uk

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MPs unite behind counter-terror legislation amendment opposing Temporary Exclusion Orders

Following the introduction of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill by Home Secretary Theresa May, a cross-party amendment has now been tabled opposing the Government’s proposed Temporary Exclusion Orders.

According to fundamental rights and freedoms concern Liberty, Temporary Exclusion Orders (TEOs) would effectively exile British citizens by revoking their passports when outside of the UK and risk exposing them to torture or possibly delivering them into the hands of terror factions.

The proposed amendment to the Bill, drafted by Liberty, would replace TEOs with a Notification and Managed Return Order (NMRO). These would allow the Home Secretary to require airlines and other carriers to notify her of the return plans of those whom she suspected of terrorism abroad. The authorities could then use their existing powers against a suspect when they return to the UK.

Crucially, the Home Secretary would not have the power to revoke passports while individuals are outside of the country.

Shami Chakrabarti: director of Liberty

Shami Chakrabarti: director of Liberty

Shami Chakrabarti, director of Liberty, commented: “Instead of abandoning British citizens abroad to the possibility of torture or further radicalisation, shouldn’t we deal with them within the rule of law? This amendment would put some much-needed common sense into this counter-productive and illiberal Bill. We urge Parliamentarians to support it.”

The amendment is supported by the Labour Party’s front bench and the Green Party.

TEOs – and Liberty’s suggested amendment – were debated on the Second Day of Committee Stage of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill on Monday 15 December.

Speaking out against the Government’s proposals

A number of MPs have already spoken out against the Home Secretary’s proposals.

At Second Reading, Sir Menzies Campbell MP said: “I confess that I’m by no means convinced of the legality of what is being suggested under TEOs. What’s the position of someone who declines to accept conditions of return and who is not subject to deportation by the country in which they temporarily find themselves? Are they not de facto stateless in such circumstances?”

Also during Second Reading, former Attorney General Dominic Grieve QC MP pointed out: “It’s a fundamental principle of the common law in this country that an individual, unconvicted – the presumption of innocence applies – should be free to reside in his or her own land. The principle of exile, as a judicial or even administrative tool, has not been tolerated in this country since the late 17th Century. Even if exclusion is on a temporary basis, what’s being proposed is a draconian and unusual power being taken by the State. The point has been made that the proposal could be in breach of our international legal obligations by rendering a person stateless.”

Chris Bryant MP said: “TEOs would, in effect, result in the exile – albeit short-term and temporary – of British citizens, in many cases to other countries. All history suggests that such action further radicalises people and makes them more dangerous enemies to this country.”

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GCHQ launches Royal British Legion’s Gloucestershire County Poppy Appeal 2014

To launch this year’s Royal British Legion Gloucestershire County Poppy Appeal, around 1,400 GCHQ staff – both civilian and military – worked together to create a giant poppy in the centre of the iconic GCHQ ‘doughnut’ building in Cheltenham.

Representing remembrance of the past and hope for the future, the stunning poppy was created using Royal Navy personnel wearing black uniforms to form the centre. They were surrounded by GCHQ staff dressed in red rain ponchos and other military personnel attired in green combat dress to form the stalk.

In a year that marks the centenary of the conflict which gave birth to the poppy as a symbol of remembrance and hope, the Royal British Legion’s role remains as contemporary and as vital as ever, supporting today’s generation of Armed Forces families and veterans.

For its part, GCHQ has a long history of supporting the military stretching back to 1914. Whenever and wherever British forces have deployed, GCHQ has been ready to assist, providing intelligence to help keep UK troops safe. Indeed, this enduring connection meant that there was no shortage of volunteers to help the Gloucestershire Legion with their efforts in the centenary year of World War I.

To launch this year’s Royal British Legion Gloucestershire County Poppy Appeal, around 1,400 GCHQ staff - both civilian and military - worked together to create a giant poppy in the centre of the iconic GCHQ building in Cheltenham

To launch this year’s Royal British Legion Gloucestershire County Poppy Appeal, around 1,400 GCHQ staff – both civilian and military – worked together to create a giant poppy in the centre of the iconic GCHQ building in Cheltenham

The completed poppy measured 38 metres in diameter with a 28 metre-long stalk. It was made up of 100 military and 1,308 civilian staff. Thanks to thorough military planning and some loud hailers, it took just over an hour to make sure everyone was position.

‘Top Secret Brass’ – GCHQ’s brass band – provided rousing music to keep the spirits up while everyone found their place. The mood was light at times: a Mexican wave was attempted but as the helicopter flew overhead to take the aerial shots, a poignant silence fell over the courtyard in a shared moment of reflection.

The event gave all involved the chance to actively show their support for the Royal British Legion and the military family.

One of the GCHQ participants who made up part of the petal described his experience. He said: “I was really proud to take part and show my support for the Royal British Legion by joining my colleagues, united in purpose, to honour those who have served – and continue to serve – this country.”

Supporting the work of The Royal British Legion

Nicole Mayall, community fundraiser for Gloucestershire’s 2014 Poppy Appeal, commented: “It’s really moving to see so many people standing together in support of The Royal British Legion’s work and to launch this year’s Poppy Appeal. We’re so grateful to all the staff at GCHQ who’ve made this possible. The money raised through the Poppy Appeal goes directly to the Legion’s welfare work, in turn providing through life care to anyone who’s currently serving in the British Armed Forces, anyone who has previously served and their families.”

Chris – a GCHQ civilian employee who had previously deployed overseas to support the military – spoke about his impressions of the day. “I’ve worked with the military in Afghanistan and seen at first-hand how GCHQ intelligence can help keep UK troops safe while they’re on operations. I’m proud to see so many people from GCHQ showing their support for the Royal British Legion and the military family.”

Participants were invited to make a donation to take part in the event and no less than £1,730 was raised.

The ponchos left over from the day will be donated to charity, namely a number of scout groups in the local area and Bloodbikes (a charity providing out of hours emergency medical courier services to Gloucestershire and the surrounding counties).

The poppy, representing Remembrance of the past and hope for the future, was created using Royal Navy personnel wearing black uniforms to form the centre. They were surrounded by GCHQ staff in red rain ponchos and other military personnel in green combat dress to form the stalk

The poppy, representing Remembrance of the past and hope for the future, was created using Royal Navy personnel wearing black uniforms to form the centre. They were surrounded by GCHQ staff in red rain ponchos and other military personnel in green combat dress to form the stalk

GCHQ: the detail

Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) is one of the three UK Intelligence and Security Agencies along with MI5 and the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6). GCHQ works to protect the UK and its citizens from a range of threats to national security, including those posed by terrorism, serious and organised crime and cyber attack.

The organisation also works to safeguard UK forces wherever they are deployed and, through its Information Security arm CESG, provides policy and assistance on the security of Government communications and electronic data.

At the heart of GCHQ’s support to the military is its staff. In recent conflicts, GCHQ staff have volunteered in numbers for deployment to war zones such that they can help keep the military safe. 90 GCHQ staff have received the medal for service in Iraq and 156 for their service in Afghanistan.

During November 2014, a number of memories and reflections of GCHQ staff who have worked to support the military – from World War I to the present day – will be shared on the GCHQ website. Check back at: http://www.gchq.gov.uk for further information from 1 November.

About The Royal British Legion

The Royal British Legion is the nation’s leading Armed Forces charity. The Legion provides immediate support and life-long care to Armed Forces families in need, spending £1.4 million each week to deliver direct, practical assistance and support to the Armed Forces community.

The Poppy Appeal 2014 introduces the Legion’s new position: ‘Live On – To the memory of the fallen and the future of the living’. This message provides a clear understanding of what The Royal British Legion does on a daily basis.

GCHQ has a long history of supporting the military stretching back to 1914

GCHQ has a long history of supporting the military stretching back to 1914

Remembrance is a hugely significant part of the Legion’s work, but the organisation also helps the living to approach their future with hope. Through the ‘Live On’ message, the Legion aims to capture the public’s imagination and reaffirm the meaning of the poppy as a symbol of both remembrance and hope.

The Royal British Legion created the Poppy Appeal to help those returning from the First World War. A century on from the start of that conflict, the organisation is still helping today’s Armed Forces families in much the same way, whether they are having to cope with bereavement, living with disability or working to find employment.

The fundraising target for the Poppy Appeal 2014 is a record £40 million (an increase on last year’s total of £39 million).

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Second Edition of The Handbook of Security published by Palgrave Macmillan

Extensively updated, expanded and reorganised, the Second Edition of The Handbook of Security – which is edited by Professor Martin Gill FSyI, the director of PRCI – provides “the most comprehensive analysis of scholarly security debates and issues” to date.

Informed by a range of disciplines – among them environmental science, criminology, politics and economics – the book brings together contributions from some of the world’s leading scholars to explore the most important issues impacting our understanding of how ‘security’ is provided.

Consisting of 44 chapters, the second edition includes over 25 brand new contributions from international experts in areas as diverse as food security, cyber security, workplace crime, terrorism, organised crime, counterfeiting, intelligence, CCTV, piracy and private military companies in addition to an entirely new section on approaches to researching security through ethnography, systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

The Handbook of Security: now in its Second Edition

The Handbook of Security: now in its Second Edition

The book is divided into seven parts – namely disciplines and security, offences, crime and security in sectors, researching security, security products and services, security and its management and critiquing security.

In later sections, this substantive reference work analyses security products and services such as security guarding, alarms and CCTV as well as the management of security. Here, chapters focus on crisis management, partnerships and regulation. The book also applies discussions of crime and security to a variety of sectors including retail, finance and tourism.

The final section critiques security using various approaches including critical security studies, the ‘professionalisation’ of security and ethics.

Put simply, The Handbook of Security is essential reading for all those engaged with the security world.

Supporting testimonials for The Handbook of Security

“Martin Gill has fully updated and expanded his hugely successful Handbook of Security. This new edition brings together first-rate scholars to cover the history and nature of security, the nature of different offences and security practices in different sectors, as well as the issues of management and regulation. A must-have for anyone working in this field” (Tim Newburn, London School of Economics, UK)

“Martin Gill has done more to advance the science and practice of security than anybody else around. Gill has used his considerable professional networks and knowledge of the field to assemble generalists and specialists to produce the most thorough array of chapters on security that I have seen so far” (Marcus Felson, Texas State University, USA)

Professor Martin Gill FSyI

Professor Martin Gill FSyI

“In introducing this new edition of his highly successful Handbook, Martin Gill writes that ‘studying security is an exciting place to be’. The book’s contents amply bear out his view” (Ronald V Clarke, School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University, USA)

“A robust collection of new research on a broad variety of contemporary security topics. I recommend it highly to researchers, academicians and security professionals” (Richard C Hollinger, University of Florida, USA)

“Security as an idea, a concern and a pursuit has dramatically reshaped – and is reshaping – social life everywhere. As it does so, it’s transforming governance, Government and scholarship across a wide range of disciplines. This Second Edition of The Handbook of Security is both welcome and timely” (Clifford Shearing, University of Cape Town, South Africa and Griffith University, Australia)

Ordering your copy of The Handbook of Security

The book (ISBN: 9781137323279) is available in both hardback and eBook formats. Access the Table of Contents and learn more about the contributors

For more information on The Handbook of Security’s contents, and to order your copy, visit the Palgrave Macmillan website

You can also e-mail orders direct to: orders@palgrave.com

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Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill receives Royal Assent

Legislation to ensure UK law enforcement and intelligence agencies continue to have access to the vital evidence and information they need in order to investigate criminal activity, prevent terrorism and protect the public has received Royal Assent.

The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act addresses urgent issues around the retention of communications data by companies as well as the interception of communications.

The legislation was brought forward after the European Court of Justice struck down the European directive that formed the basis of UK regulations governing the ability of the police service and others to access communications data retained by communication service providers.

The Act provides a clear basis in UK law for the retention of communications data and ensures this crucial information continues to be available when it’s needed.

Home Secretary Theresa May

Home Secretary Theresa May

The Act is also a response to uncertainty from overseas communications service providers around the legal framework that underpins their co-operation with intelligence and law enforcement agencies regarding investigatory powers. The Act makes clear the obligations that apply to anyone providing communications services to customers in the UK under Part 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA), irrespective of where those companies are based.

The Act, which comes into effect immediately, only maintains and clarifies the existing regime and does not create any new powers, rights of access or obligations on companies beyond those that already exist.

It also strengthens existing safeguards and includes a two-year ‘sunset clause’ to ensure the legal framework is kept under review into the next Parliament.

In parallel, the Government has announced new measures to increase transparency and oversight.

Necessary powers and capabilities

Home Secretary Theresa May said: “The threats faced by the UK from terrorism and organised crime remain considerable, and the Government would have been negligent if it had not made sure the people and the organisations that keep us safe have the powers and capabilities they need.”

May added: “If we had not acted immediately, investigations could have suddenly gone dark overnight. Criminals and terrorists would have been able to go about their work unimpeded, and innocent lives would have been lost.”

Continuing the theme, the Home Secretary said: “The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act will ensure the job of those who protect us does not become even more difficult and that they can maintain the use of vital powers to solve crime, save lives and protect the public from harm.”

May concluded: “This Act has cross-party support and I would like to express my gratitude to all those who recognised both the need for this legislation and the reason why it was so important to see it enacted quickly.”

Bringing offenders to justice

Communications data is the ‘who, when, where and how’ of a communication, such as a telephone call or an e-mail, but not its content.

It’s often the decisive factor in successful prosecutions and has helped police solve a large number of serious crimes, including the Oxford and Rochdale child grooming cases as well as the Soham and Rhys Jones murders.

As a result of the ECJ ruling, communications service providers may have started to delete data they are currently required to retain. This would have had potentially devastating consequences for investigations, which often rely on communications data that’s several months old at the point at which it’s requested.

The Act provides a clear basis in domestic law for the retention of communications data in the UK.

Protecting national security

Interception powers, which are subject to very strict controls and oversight, are used alongside other covert capabilities and techniques to identify, understand and disrupt serious criminals and terrorists before they can cause damage or endanger lives.

The Act has made explicit what is already implicit in RIPA that the provisions in RIPA which relate to communications data and interception apply to overseas communications companies offering services to UK customers.

Any loss of co-operation from the companies would have immediately resulted in a major loss of the powers and capabilities that are used every day to counter the threats we face from terrorists and organised criminals.

Introducing new safeguards

The UK has one of the best communications data oversight and authorisation systems in the world. Nonetheless, the following steps will be taken to strengthen oversight and transparency:

(1) The Independent Reviewer of Counter-Terrorism Legislation will hold a full review of powers and capabilities.
(2) The Interception of Communications Commissioner will report every six months on the operation of the legislation.
(3) A senior diplomat will be appointed to lead discussions with overseas Governments and communication service providers to assess and develop formal arrangements for the accessing of data for law enforcement and intelligence purposes held in different jurisdictions.
(4) An Independent Privacy and Civil Liberties Board will be created to consider the balance between the threat and civil liberties concerns in the UK where they are affected by policies, procedures and legislation relating to the prevention of terrorism.
(5) The number of public bodies currently able to request communications data will be reduced.
(6) The UK Government will publish annual transparency reports to make more information publicly available than ever before on the ways in which surveillance powers are operated.

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IHS Report: ‘Global terrorism and insurgency attacks rapidly increase in five years’

The number of attacks by non-state armed groups around the world has rapidly increased in just five years according to IHS Jane’s 2013 Global Terrorism and Insurgency Attack Index from IHS Inc.

“In 2009, a worldwide total of 7,217 attacks were recorded from open sources,” said Matthew Henman, manager of IHS Jane’s Terrorism and Insurgency Centre (JTIC) which carried out the study. “In 2013, that number increased by more than 150% to 18,524.”

Key highlights from IHS Jane’s 2013 Global Terrorism and Insurgency Attack Index are as follows:

• Global: Significant rises in global militant and non-militant fatalities
• Arab Spring countries see attacks spike
• Syria: Attacks almost double between 2012 and 2013
• Iraq: Suicide attacks quadruple and Al-Qaeda in Iraq re-enters the Top Five most active non-state armed groups in the world
• Sub-Saharan Africa: Terrorism fatalities rise

Global trends

“The epicenter of 2013 activity was in the Middle East, with significant pockets of violence radiating out to neighboring regions in Africa and South Asia,” stated Henman.

“We have also seen a dramatic rise in the number of militant and non-militant casualties. In 2012, 13,872 militants and 10,562 non-militants deaths were recorded from open sources. In 2013, non-militants fatalities almost doubled to 17,554 and militant fatalities numbered 21,490. These are some of the largest rises we have recorded in the past several years.”

Arab Spring countries witness attack spike

Henman stated: “In 2013, JTIC recorded a spike in activity by non-state armed groups in Tunisia and Egypt. Attacks in Tunisia grew from 21 in 2012 to 72 in 2013. In Egypt, the number of attacks recorded jumped from 63 in 2012 to 431 in 2013.”

He continued: “In Libya, there were 237 attacks recorded in 2013 and 81 in 2012. While the increases in Egypt and Tunisia were both somewhat attributable to the emergence of Islamist militant groups, violent protests following the deposing of President Muhammad Morsi in Egypt accounted for the majority of sub-state violence recorded by JTIC.”

Syria’s attack count almost doubles between 2012 and 2013

Henman added: “Due to a plurality of factors, the anti-Government insurgency in Syria intensified notably in 2013. Between 2012 and 2013, the number of attacks recorded by JTIC almost doubled. In 2012, we recorded 2,670 attacks. In 2013, that number jumped to 4,694.”

Suicide attacks quadruple in Iraq, Al-Qaeda in Iraq re-enters the Top 5

“A key indication of the intensifying level of violence in Iraq was that the number of suicide attacks in the country quadrupled from 2012 to 2013,” explained Henman, “with the 2013 total almost triple that recorded in neighboring Syria and almost double that recorded in Afghanistan.”

Henman said: “In 2013, 207 attacks were claimed by or attributed to Al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI). This is a 160% increase from the 79 recorded in open sources in 2012. Despite this increase, it does not fully reflect AQI’s predominant role in driving the 52% increase in the recorded number of attacks in Iraq and the 148% increase in non-militant fatalities. In 2012, there were 2,297 attacks in Iraq. At the end of 2013, that figure stands at 3,499.”

Sub-Saharan Africa’s rising terrorism risks

Henman concluded: “While the number of recorded attacks has only slightly increased in sub-Saharan Africa, we are seeing more lethal attacks claiming a higher number of fatalities. In 2012, JTIC recorded 1,370 attacks in sub-Saharan Africa with 3,434 fatalities. In 2013, JTIC recorded 1,391 attacks with 3,903 fatalities. When we look at Nigeria specifically, attacks decreased from 305 in 2012 to 137 in 2013, but fatalities rose from 1,351 in 2012 to 1,447 in 2013. This was partly due to an intensification of violence by militant Islamist group Boko Haram, but also a consequence of several high-profile instances of inter-communal violence across the country.”

Top 10 most active non-state armed groups in 2013

1. Barisan Revolusi Nasional (Thailand)
2. Taliban
3. Islami Chhatra Shibir (Bangladesh)
4. Communist Party of India – Maoist
5. Al-Qaeda in Iraq
6. Harakat al-Shabaab al-Mujahideen (Al-Shabaab)
7. FARC (Colombia)
8. New People’s Army (Philippines)
9. Jabhat al-Nusra (Syria)
10. Unified Communist Party of Nepal – Maoist

About IHS Jane’s 2013 Global Terrorism and Insurgency Attack Index

The IHS Jane’s Terrorism and Insurgency Centre uses open source data to build its global database of terrorist and insurgent events, archived to 1997.

The IHS Jane’s Global Terrorism and Insurgency Attack Index is an annual report for clients highlighting key data and global trends from this database, which is updated on a daily basis. The database enables users to search by location, target, group (active and dormant), tactics and casualty numbers in order to quickly obtain actionable intelligence and/or data.

For more information and a global map of attacks visit: http://www.ihsjanes360.com and for daily updates follow: @IHS4DefRiskSec on Twitter

JTIC defines an attack as any incident in which a sub-state actor (either an individual or organisation) commits an illegal act of politically or ideologically motivated violence against persons or property with the aim of coercing others to adopt or comply with its objectives or to submit to their authority that results in death, damage or disruption.

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‘UK companies lag behind the US in cyber security readiness’ reveals BT survey

Many Board level executives around the world are still failing to address cyber security issues, while hacktivism and malicious insider threats (intentional leaks) are perceived to be on the rise.

Just 17% of UK business leaders view cyber security as a major priority compared to 41% in the US, research from BT has revealed.

The research, which assessed attitudes to cyber security and levels of preparedness among IT decision-makers, highlights that UK businesses are lagging behind their US counterparts in crucial areas.

Only one-in-five (21%) respondents in the UK are able to measure the return on investment (ROI) of their cyber security measures compared to nine-in-ten (90%) of US companies. Similarly, 86% of US directors and senior decision-makers are given IT security training compared to just 37% in the UK.

More than half (58%) of IT decision-makers globally stated that their Boards underestimate the importance of cyber security. This figure increases to 74% in the US but drops to 55% in the UK.

Hacktivism set to pose greater risk

The difference in levels of preparedness correlates with attitudes to threats. Non-malicious insider threats (eg accidental loss of data) are currently the most commonly cited security concern globally, being reported as a serious threat by 65% of IT decision-makers.

In the UK, this falls to 60% and is followed by malicious insider threats (51%), hacktivism (37%), organised crime (32%), nation states (15%) and terrorism (12%).

In the US, the proportion of IT decision-makers who see non-malicious insider threats as a severe threat increases to 85% and is followed by malicious insider threats (79%), hacktivism (77%), organised crime (75%), terrorism (72%) and nation states (70%).

Mark Hughes: CEO at BT Security

Mark Hughes: CEO at BT Security

Looking ahead, more than half of global IT decision-makers believe that hacktivism (54%) and malicious insider threats (53%) will pose a greater risk over the next 12 months. In the US, this increases to 73% and 74% respectively. This compares to 29% and 23% in the UK.

Globally, terrorism is seen as the threat least likely to pose more risk over the next 12 months.

Myriad of internal and external threats

Mark Hughes, CEO of BT Security, said: “The research provides a fascinating insight into the changing threat landscape and the challenge this poses for organisations around the world. The massive expansion of employee-owned devices, cloud computing and extranets has multiplied the risk of abuse and attack, leaving organisations exposed to a myriad of internal and external threats which are malicious or accidental.”

Hughes continued: “US businesses should be celebrated for putting cyber security on the front foot. The risks to business are moving too fast for a purely reactive security approach to be successful. Nor should cyber security be seen as an issue for the IT Department alone.”

In response to emerging threats, three quarters (75%) of IT decision-makers globally say they would like to overhaul their infrastructure and design them with security features from the ground up. 74% would like to train all staff in cyber security Best Practice. Similarly, just over half (54%) say they would like to engage an external vendor to monitor the system and prevent attacks.

Hughes added: “As the threat landscape continues to evolve, CEOs and Board level executives need to invest in cyber security and educate their people in the IT Department and beyond. The stakes are too high for cyber security to be pushed to the bottom of the pile.”

About the research

This research was undertaken by Vanson Bourne for BT in October 2013.
Five hundred interviews were carried out with IT decision-makers in medium-to-large sized enterprises across seven countries – UK, France, Germany, USA, Brazil, Hong Kong and Singapore – and in a range of sectors (finance, pharmaceutical, retail and government).

BT Security: staying ahead of the threat curve

BT Security is building on 70 years’ experience of helping organisations around the globe and across all sectors get ahead of the threat curve and reduce the uncertainty and complexity of security.

The company provides an end-to-end capability to help organisations enjoy higher levels of security at a time when security budgets are not keeping pace with the threat landscape.

BT Security thinks about assets, people and processes, and combines these with both network and security intelligence to help customers stay ahead of the security risks.

BT Security protects both BT and its customers. These customers are advised by a global team of 1,300 security practitioners, 600 global security specialists and a professional services team of approximately 4,000.

The BT Security Assure portfolio covers: Assure Managed Firewall, Assure Web Security, Assure Intrusion Prevention, Assure Message Scan, Assure Denial of Service Mitigation, Assure Cyber, Assure Managed Cloud, Assure Threat Monitoring and Assure Vulnerability Scanning.

To find out more about BT Security visit: http://www.bt.com/btassure/securitythatmatters

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