Tag Archives: SaferCash

Daniel Sanzeri joins team at BSIA-led intelligence initiative SaferCash

British Security Industry Association (BSIA)-led intelligence initiative SaferCash has appointed Daniel Sanzeri as its new national higher police analyst.

Sanzeri has worked in various intelligence-driven roles for over a decade and joins the SaferCash team from the West Midlands Police. Having worked for Staffordshire Police as a senior force intelligence analyst, Sanzeri managed both strategic and tactical intelligence as well as the delivery of detailed analysis for business change.

DanielSanzeriSaferCash

Daniel Sanzeri: joining the team at SaferCash

Sanzeri’s intelligence career began in Training Standards. He was one of the first analysts assigned to the Claims Management Regulator – a unit in the Ministry of Justice and now part of the Financial Conduct Authority –  and rose through the ranks to senior roles within major UK law firms as legal director for intelligence focusing in particular on counter fraud.

Sarah Staff, head of SaferCash, said: “I’m delighted to welcome Daniel as he joins SaferCash. His experience of working directly to disrupt several serious and organised criminal networks which cause harm to communities and businesses alike is going to be vital for SaferCash as we focus on disrupting what many perceive to be ‘victimless’ crimes. I wish Daniel every success in his new role and very much look forward to working with him.”

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Government commitment “crucial” in the continued fight against Cash-in-Transit crime

Despite attack levels reaching an all-time low in 2013, falling victim to violence and robbery remains a very real threat for the security sector’s dedicated Cash-in-Transit couriers. With interim reports for 2014 suggesting crime figures within this sector are in danger of rising, the British Security Industry Association (BSIA) plans to continue its work aimed at reducing the risks faced by couriers as they fulfil this essential public service.

Transporting around £500 billion every year – the equivalent to a staggering £1.4 billion every day, in fact – the UK’s Cash-in-Transit industry performs an essential public service, keeping cash moving around the country and supporting banks, retailers and businesses alike by facilitating millions of transactions on a daily basis.

However, the large amount of money and valuables involved renders Cash-in-Transit couriers particularly vulnerable to attempted robberies and often violent assaults.

In 2013, the number of attacks perpetrated on cash couriers reached a record low, with just 270 attacks taking place. That figure is 30% less than in 2012, in fact, and represents an impressive 75% decrease on the all-time high of 1,060 attacks recorded back in 2009. Despite this reduction, though, couriers remain vulnerable to attack, particularly when carrying cash across the pavement from their secure vehicle to the client’s premises.

Serious injury remains a very real threat. Overall injury rates have decreased since 2012, but almost a quarter of attacks in 2013 (24%) resulted in some kind of physical harm being done to the couriers involved. In addition, the proportion of attacks where firearms were used (or their use was intimated) rose from 10% in 2012 to 14% in 2013.

The Government's ongoing commitment will be crucial in the fight against Cash-in-Transit crime

The Government’s ongoing commitment will be crucial in the fight against Cash-in-Transit crime

Partnership approach involving Government and the police service

Reducing the risks faced by cash couriers remains a key focus of the partnership approach taken by the private security industry – in conjunction with the Home Office and police forces across the country – to tackle Cash-in-Transit crime. With 2014’s figures indicating some slight month-on-month rises in the number of attacks carried out on cash couriers, the commitment of all stakeholders to the continuation of this partnership approach has arguably never been more important.

Steve Hurst, the head of SaferCash, commented: “For couriers going about their daily duties these attack figures can never be far from their minds. It’s for this very reason that we as an industry, along with our colleagues in Government and police forces across the country, cannot afford to rest on our laurels.”

Established in 2007, SaferCash is a security initiative which aims to reduce the number of attacks on cash couriers through the effective sharing of intelligence between members of the Cash-in-Transit industry and police forces nationwide. Operated by the BSIA, SaferCash provides a national framework for information and intelligence sharing between individual police forces and operational security personnel, while also affording essential and immediate support for Cash-in-Transit crew members who may have witnessed a suspicious incident or activity.

Establishing a partnership between industry and the police service has given SaferCash the ability to identify linked offences and spot where organised crime groups are active across force boundaries. In the case of Cash-in-Transit, these groups are operating on an increasingly nationwide basis, impacting on local communities and often using the proceeds of their crimes to fund other criminal enterprises such as drug dealing or human trafficking.

Keeping couriers safe is the key objective of SaferCash. With most robberies and attacks on couriers taking place as they cross the pavement, it’s essential to minimise the distance couriers have to travel between the secure vehicle and the delivery premises. This means that many vehicles are forced to park illegally in order to make safe deliveries.

Couriers remain vulnerable to attack, particularly when carrying cash across the pavement from the secure vehicle to their client’s premises

Couriers remain vulnerable to attack, particularly when carrying cash across the pavement from the secure vehicle to their client’s premises

The impact of robberies in the Cash-in-Transit sector is most keenly felt by those who suffer directly as a result of attacks. It’s the protection of victims and the prevention of future attacks which most vehemently demonstrates the need for all stakeholders to remain committed to reducing the level of Cash-in-Transit crime.

For more information about the BSIA’s Cash and Valuables in Transit Section visit: http://www.bsia.co.uk/cash-and-valuables-in-transit

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Cash-in-Transit attacks reach all-time low but threat of violence remains

Despite attack levels reaching an all-time low in 2013, falling victim to attack and robbery remains a very real threat for the security industry’s Cash-in-Transit couriers according to the latest statistics published by SaferCash (the Cash-in-Transit intelligence service of the British Security Industry Association).

Transporting around £500 billion every year – the equivalent to £1.4 billion every day – the UK’s Cash-in-Transit industry performs an essential public service, keeping cash moving around the country and in turn supporting banks, retailers and businesses by facilitating millions of transactions every day.

The number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers reached a record low last year, with just 270 attacks taking place. This represents a 30% decrease when compared to 2012, and an impressive 75% decrease on the all-time high figure of 1,060 attacks in 2009.

The number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers reached a record low last year, with just 270 attacks taking place

The number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers reached a record low last year, with just 270 attacks taking place

James Kelly, CEO of the British Security Industry Association (BSIA), commented: “These consistent year-on-year successes are testament to the continued joint efforts of industry, Government and the Police in tackling this serious and violent crime. However, it’s the violent nature of this crime – and its significant impact on victims – that’s the driving force behind all stakeholders’ efforts to reduce both the number and impact of Cash-in-Transit attacks. The statistics contained in this latest report highlight the vital importance of all stakeholders’ continued commitment to this cause.”

Risk of violence

Looking closer at the risk of violence faced by couriers, it’s clear that – despite an overall reduction in the number of attacks – serious injury is still a very real threat to couriers.

While overall injury rates have decreased since 2012, almost a quarter of attacks in 2013 (24%) resulted in some kind of injury, while the proportion of attacks where firearms were used or intimated has risen from 10% in 2012 to 14% in 2013.

Steve Hurst, head of SaferCash, explained: “For couriers going about their daily duties, these figures can never be far from their minds. It’s for this reason that we as an industry, along with our colleagues in Government and police forces across the country, cannot afford to rest on our laurels.”

Established in 2007, SaferCash is a security initiative which aims to reduce the number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers through the effective sharing of intelligence between the industry and police forces nationwide.

Operated by the BSIA, SaferCash provides a national framework for information and intelligence sharing between individual police forces and security personnel, while also providing essential and immediate support for Cash-in-Transit crews who witness a suspicious incident.

Building a partnership between industry and the police has afforded SaferCash the ability to identify linked offences and spot where organised crime groups (OCGs) are active across force boundaries. In the case of Cash-in-Transit, these groups are operating on an increasingly nationwide basis, impacting on local communities and often using the proceeds of their crime to fund other criminal enterprises such as drugs or human trafficking.

Continued commitment to the cause

Despite the contribution of Cash-in-Transit crime to the wider criminal network, the impact of robbery is most keenly felt by those who suffer directly as a results of the attack. It’s the protection of victims and prevention of future attacks which remain the driving forces behind all stakeholders’ continued commitment to reducing the level of Cash-in-Transit crime.

James Kelly: CEO at the BSIA

James Kelly: CEO at the BSIA

James Kelly concluded: “Often, couriers suffer extreme and unforgettable violence. They demonstrate admirable bravery in delivering this essential public service. My thoughts remain with all of the couriers who suffered attacks last year. Preventing others from experiencing the same physical and psychological harm is the driving force behind our ongoing commitment to reducing Cash-in-Transit crime even further in 2014.”

For more information about the BSIA and SaferCash visit: http://www.bsia.co.uk/cash-in-transit

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