Tag Archives: RISCAuthority

BSIA drives industry agreement on Interim Update of PD6662 scheme for alarm systems

Key organisations from across the security business sector have realised an industry agreement on an Interim Update of the PD6662 scheme for Intruder and Hold-Up Alarm Systems, reports the British Security Industry Association (BSIA). 

The agreement was written with the input of Trade Associations, insurers, inspectorates and the police service and has taken around four months to produce. The decision was made to publish the agreement outside of the British Standards Institution’s (BSI) own standards framework to allow for a more fundamental review of the PD6662 scheme to take place within the BSI and subsequently align with the introduction of the much-awaited second amendment to EN 50131-1, which is still under development in Europe.

In addition to the BSIA, leading organisations involved in the development of the agreement include the Fire and Security Association, the National Police Chiefs’ Council, the National Security Inspectorate, Police Scotland, the RISCAuthority and the Security Systems and Alarms Inspection Board.

A number of the BSIA’s Security Systems Section and Security Equipment Manufacturers Section members put forward their industry-leading knowledge during the consultation.

David Wilkinson: technical director at the BSIA

David Wilkinson: technical director at the BSIA

A key focus for members of the BSIA’s Security Systems Section and its Security Equipment Manufacturers Section has been to ensure that there was a method of enabling the use of mobile devices to set or unset intruder alarm systems. This is an issue that needed to be addressed as a result of the restrictions in their use through BS 8243 – the British Standard for alarm confirmation – coupled with the lack of clarity in the current EN 50131-3 standard.

David Wilkinson, director of technical services at the BSIA, commented: “The BSIA has played an instrumental part in shaping this agreement and we’re pleased that other industry organisations have also seen the benefit in contributing to it and aligning with it. The PD6662 scheme for Intruder and Hold-Up Alarms is somewhat out of date. This industry agreement provides the ideal opportunity to update the existing scheme and enable the use of mobile device technology in this important market sector while the full-scale review of the PD is undertaken through the BSI.”

The introduction of mobile technology enables professional security installers to use this technology, something which they could not do under the current PD6662 scheme. In turn, this passes on the benefits of using newer technology to the end users or purchasers of alarm systems.

The industry agreement will come into effect on 1 September 2015 and it’s intended that the content of this agreement will be incorporated into the revised edition of PD6662.

The BSIA will continue to influence the European standards that impact on intruder alarm systems to ensure that, wherever possible, the requirements in the industry agreement can be positioned at a European level, in turn negating the need for a longer term ‘national’ implementation.

*Published earlier this month, the BSIA’s Annual Review highlights some of the many standards the Trade Association and its constituent members have influenced in the past year. To download a copy or for more information on the BSIA visit: www.bsia.co.uk

**Futher information about the industry agreement announced (or, indeed, any other standard applicable to the UK’s private security sector) is available from the Trade Association’s Technical Department (tel: 0845 389 3889)

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Reductions in false alarms and police response times revealed at CSL Insurers’ Forum

CSL DualCom’s seventh annual Insurers’ Forum witnessed an excellent turnout of over 50 senior professionals and consultants from leading insurance companies who gathered at Vodafone’s headquarters in Newbury.

Ray Kay, head of Vodafone M2M UK, kicked off the discussions by outlining Vodafone’s vision that 50% of organisations will have adopted M2M by 2015. Kay also outlined the substantial investments being made in 2G, 3G and 4G networks in order to ensure perfect voice calls, competitive 3G coverage and 98% indoor 4G coverage by the end of next year.

National Security Inspectorate (NSI) CEO Richard Jenkins then described his organisation’s focus on raising standards in the industry and how becoming an NSI approved company directly impacts on this. The NSI believes that robust services, tougher regulation and police response measures are all key contributing factors.

CSL DualCom’s group managing director Simon Banks also touched on standards and reviewed a specific example of how CSL DualCom takes responsibility for the entire journey of an alarm signal.

Future proofing and carbon footprint reduction via Remote Servicing and Diagnostics (RSD) was touched upon, a message mirrored by Mark Emery from Swift Fire & Security. Emery explained how the additional benefit of reduced engineering costs offered by RSD is a great asset to the company’s engineering armoury.

The NSI's CEO Richard Jenkins addresses the audience at Vodafone's hq

The NSI’s CEO Richard Jenkins addresses the audience at Vodafone’s hq

Ed Barge of EMCS presented an overall picture of the current trends from the Alarm Receiving Centre perspective, noting a particular increase in upgrades from bells-only or Digicom systems to monitored single path solutions very much in keeping with the day’s theme of raising standards.

Geoff Wright of AIG then took the audience through a Case Study focused on a £25 million loss at a large warehouse. In the example given, insufficient management programmes caused delays in calling the fire brigade despite the correct installation of fire detection, sprinkler and security systems.

Reducing risks to the public and property

Pat Allen – chairman of the Fire and Security Association – chose to list measures that can be taken to reduce unwanted alarms. Allen advised that monitored fire systems allow for early detection which reduces risk to the public and property (as well as fire-fighters themselves).

ACPO’s Ken Meanwell highlighted the tremendous reduction in false intruder alarms in recent times which is largely thanks to advances in alarm signalling coupled with more stringent penalties for repeat false alarms. This greater efficiency has also allowed for a reduction in police response times.

The CSL DualCom Insurers' Forum proved popular with delegates

The CSL DualCom Insurers’ Forum proved popular with delegates

Mike Jay – insurance expert and convenor of the RISCAuthority Security Group at the Fire Protection Association – concurred with these findings as his organisation has witnessed a reduction in claims and criminality due to the success of security companies and the police service in increasing the risks involved for criminals.

The BSIA’s technical director Alex Carmichael considered the discrepancies that can arise between test houses for European third party specifications and provided an update on both European and international standards.

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