Tag Archives: Research

Details unveiled for Euralarm and EUSAS Conference on Fire Detection and Security in the Aviation Sector

The conference on Fire Detection and Security in the Aviation Sector, organised by Euralarm and EUSAS, takes place in Bremen on Tuesday 10 and Wednesday 11 July. Those professionals interested in participating in the event can download a leaflet from the Euralarm and EUSAS websites and register directly. 

The joint event is aimed at representatives of airports, the aviation industry, the fire and security industry, test institutes, standards developers, practitioners and scientists interested in the engineering and technologies underpinning fire safety and security in the aviation sector.

This conference is about sharing experiences in the field of research, application and testing of fire safety and security technologies with the focus on aircraft and airport applications, but will also include aspects relating to passenger safety.

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The first session focuses on various aspects of fire detection and fire extinguishing in an aircraft. The second changes the focus from fire detection to more integrated safety and security solutions as well as evacuation and fire extinguishing in airports and aircraft.

During the second day’s third and fourth sessions, the focus switches to early and effective fire detection technologies for different applications at airports, such as aircraft hangars or cable tunnels. After looking into current questions of security in luggage areas, the final session is set to focus on evacuation and related human behaviour in crowded public areas.

The conference will highlight a variety of today‘s aviation and airport-specific safety and security issues, providing attendees with an overview and deeper insights on special topics as well as inspiring fruitful discussions.

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TDSi’s Ian Hoare gains Master’s degree from Bournemouth University

Integrated security manufacturer TDSi has announced that its software analyst and developer Ian Hoare has graduated with a Master’s degree in Cyber Security and Human Factors from Bournemouth University. Hoare’s qualification demonstrates the company’s continued commitment to research, education and training.

TDSi’s managing director John Davies commented: “We’re very proud that Ian has earned his Master’s degree, having worked extremely hard to study alongside his role at TDSi. As a company, we champion education and training as it benefits not only the person and the business, but also the security industry as a whole.”

Hoare elaborated on the significance of his new degree for his role at TDSi. “This new qualification demonstrates that I’m up-to-date with the very latest advances in cloud computing and online security. The TDSi team is always at the forefront of secure software for the modern world, but we’re keen to illustrate this with Continuing Professional Development, giving additional confidence to our customers that all has been done to secure their data.”

Ian Graduation 2017

Ian Hoare of TDSi

As part of his graduation process, Hoare produced a dissertation that examines the secure development life-cycle and how it can fit into the agile development process. He commented: “The Agile development process doesn’t allow for any security processes. There’s an argument that it shouldn’t, as it’s an overhead of the initial development.”

Hoare concluded: “However, it’s important to identify and mitigate vulnerabilities within the system, as the financial costs are far greater if vulnerabilities are found after the product is released. This is even more important with the EU’s looming General Data Protection Regulation, which comes into force in May next year.”

Hoare’s Master’s in Cyber Security and Human Factors is just part of an ongoing process of training and research. He concluded: “The cloud environment is continuously changing, with new threats evolving. It’s vital to use this knowledge now and to continuously keep this learning and information updated as technology and security needs evolve.”

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CESG Certified Training rebranded as GCHQ Certified Training

CESG Certified Training (CCT) was established in November 2014 to deliver training which satisfies the high standards set by CESG, the information security arm of GCHQ. APMG International is announcing that the scheme has been rebranded as GCHQ Certified Training (GCT). Effective as of 1 January 2016, the name change has been enacted to drive market recognition of the scheme and improve access to professional and relevant cyber security training.

APMG is GCHQ’s independent certification body, responsible for ensuring that training providers meet GCHQ standards. GCT helps professionals and organisations navigate the increasingly saturated cyber training market, and quickly identify training courses that meet the highest standards in terms of both content and delivery.

GCT certifies high quality cyber security training and trainers and is based on the IISP Skills Framework. This includes training suitable for those aspiring to certification under the CESG Certified Professional (CCP) scheme. The criteria for GCT are also aligned with the standards GCHQ uses for the GCHQ Certified Cyber Security Master’s degrees.

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CCT has been rebranded as GCT in recognition that GCHQ is a more widely known brand and is already used to certify cyber security Master’s degrees while also recognising high quality cyber security research. The instantly recognisable brand of GCHQ will increase awareness of the scheme for those working within cyber security, ultimately improving the availability of – and access to – cyber security training that’s fit for purpose.

Building cyber skills

A GCHQ spokesperson told Risk UK:  “One of the biggest challenges for the UK in cyber space is developing enough skilled people. Vital to building cyber skills is having relevant and high quality cyber security training. GCHQ Certified Training helps to deliver that by providing confidence in cyber security training providers and the courses they offer.’’

Commenting on the name change, Richard Pharro (CEO of APMG) said: “GCHQ is widely recognised as the pre-eminent authority on cyber intelligence and data security, which is why we fully support changing the name of the scheme. By bringing CCT under the GCHQ banner, training providers that have certified against the scheme will benefit greatly from the rebranding. This move will make it easier for end users to better understand what the certification signifies: quality, assurance and security.”

Andrew Fitzmaurice, CEO of Templar Executives (one of the first training companies to have achieved CCT certification for its courses) added: “The rebranding to GCT is a positive step for training providers and clients alike. In a market with a plethora of products, the GCHQ brand immediately helps delegates recognise which training and trainers have been rigorously assessed to deliver the highest quality learning and development, in turn reflecting Best Practice in cyber security.”

Sarah Rudge, information assurance manager at Ofqual (the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation), found that the GCT-certified course she recently attended to be of a high quality, confirming the scheme’s value in the market.

Rudge commented: “I cannot recommend highly enough the information risk management course from Ultima Risk Management, which has been certified under the GCT scheme. I found it to be the perfect mix of tuition and practical exercises. It was so refreshing to find a course which is so relevant and directly applicable to my work.”

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IHS Research Note: ‘High expectations for Next Generation HD CCTV technology’

The latest Research Note from IHS has been authored by David Green (the company’s senior analyst in video surveillance and security services), who provides some valuable insight on the market for HD CCTV equipment.

Growing slice of the $13 billion video surveillance equipment market or a small-time niche which can never keep up with the double-digit growth rates for network surveillance?

It’s a very different outlook for HD CCTV technology, depending on who you speak to.

There are those who see the growing revenues and a viable alternative to HD IP cameras for many applications. There are those who want to remain technology neutral by introducing the ‘third string to their bow’ and there are those who simply don’t believe in the technology at all.

Even accounting for the inevitable bias towards their own product line, there seems to be genuine uncertainty among manufacturers at the future direction for HD, low-latency video provision.

Starting with the ‘basic’ form of HD-SDI technology drafted in from the broadcast world, HD CCTV offered live view HD images with the chance to keep legacy coaxial cabling. Relying on demand from markets with high volumes of installed analogue systems hasn’t been a guarantee of success though.

There are high expectations for Next Generation HD CCTV solutions

There are high expectations for Next Generation HD CCTV solutions

For example, over four million analogue cameras are sold each year in the USA to a market that is predominantly replacement rather than new installation, yet penetration rates for HD CCTV are low (especially when compared to the likes of China).

So what other factors are in play? Cost and cable reach are the common discussion points that seem to put many off. While there’s clearly a demand out there for this third solution, it’s fair to say that sales cannot hit that next level of growth until costs reduce and 100 metre transmission limits are improved.

Second Generation HD CCTV solutions

However, there is cause for optimism with the launch of ‘Second Generation’ HD CCTV products starting to kick in.

For example, Dahua has already launched its CVI technology, the HDcctv Alliance has released the 2.0 standard and it’s more than just rumour that other equipment and semiconductor manufacturers have their own proprietary solutions in the latter stages of development.

In all cases, the claims of 300-1,000 metre transmission ranges and prices closer to analogue than network equipment should break down some of the barriers to adoption.

In particular, this will sustain the growth in revenue for South East Asia but could yet open doors to other developing markets such as Latin America.

Whether or not HD CCTV can crack more developed markets such as the USA remains to be seen, but Second Generation HD CCTV solutions sold to developing markets definitely pushes the global picture towards a growing slice of the market rather than the small-time niche.

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