Tag Archives: Register of Chartered Security Professionals

Chartered Security Professional status bestowed upon SIA CEO Bill Butler

The Security Institute has announced that Bill Butler – CEO of the Security Industry Authority (SIA), the Regulator for the private security business sector – is admitted to the Register of Chartered Security Professionals as of Tuesday 9 December following his interview with Garry Evanson CSyP and Bill Wyllie CSyP.

The Register of Chartered Security Professionals was created by The Security Institute on behalf of The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals back in 2011.

Applicants have to be making a strategic contribution to the development of security as a discipline and proceed through a rigorous staged assessment process. Candidates must prove they’ve reached a minimum competence level in each of five defined areas: security knowledge, practical skills, leadership, communications and professional commitment.

Once admitted, registrants are allowed to use the prestigious post-nominal CSyP after their name. They must then comply with a Code of Professional Conduct, hold Professional Indemnity insurance (either individually or via their employer) and complete Continuing Professional Development (CPD) tasks each year in order to retain the status of Chartered Security Professional.

Bill Butler CSyP: CEO at the Security Industry Authority

Bill Butler CSyP: CEO at the Security Industry Authority

The Register continues to grow with 30 professionals admitted this year alone. Typically, applicants are either employed by security service providers, are public sector employees, consultants or heads of security/senior security managers.

To date there have been applicants from the UK, Australia, the USA, Abu Dhabi, Tunisia, Dubai, the Czech Republic and Spain.

Chartered Security Professionals Registration Authority

The Chartered Security Professionals Registration Authority (CSPRA), which is chaired by The Security Institute’s President Lord Alex Carlile of Berriew CBE QC, is responsible for setting criteria and standards for Chartered Security Professionals.

This year, the CSPRA reviewed its competency requirements in order that key individuals working strategically for the development and benefit of the security profession would be eligible for acceptance onto the Register.

Commenting on the news, The Security Institute’s chairman Emma Shaw CSyP stated: “I’d like to offer my sincere congratulations to Bill Butler who now joins a very prestigious group of security professionals. The Register of Chartered Security Professionals represents ‘The Gold Standard’ in professionalism for the security industry. CSyPs demonstrate an ongoing commitment to demonstrable excellence in their work within the security business sector that sets them apart from other security practitioners.”

Shaw added: “When The Security Institute launched its ‘Manifesto for Professional Security’ in November, we stressed the importance of creating a broad awareness of security as a profession. The Register is a key component of this effort.”

Speaking about his acceptance to the Register of Chartered Security Professionals, SIA chief executive Bill Butler CSyP said: “I found the admission process to be both challenging and rewarding. I’m very pleased and proud to be admitted as a Chartered Security Professional. This reflects on my own and indeed the SIA’s commitment to the development of professional standards in the security industry.”

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‘A Manifesto for Professional Security’: The Security Institute’s ‘Vision of The Future’

On Tuesday 18 November at The Churchill War Rooms in central London, The Security Institute launched ‘A Manifesto for Professional Security’. The Keynote Speech was delivered by Emma Shaw CSyP, the Institute’s chairman, who duly outlined the organisation’s vision for making professional security more effective: a profession that’s recognised and respected for the immense value it delivers to society, to organisations in both the public and private sector and, indeed, individual members of the public.

Everything The Security Institute has done over the first 15 years of its existence has been building up to this point. We would like to think that our new document entitled: ‘Recognised, Respected and Professional: A Manifesto for Professional Security’ carries on the tradition of The Security Institute’s founding members. Back in 1999, those founding members were willing to seek change and courageous enough to do their utmost in a bold bid to realise that change.

This is the point at which I feel our professional body comes of age. The point at which we are mature enough to profess that we can only achieve our ambitions for this profession not by pursuing our own agenda or through acting as a member association with a narrow focus on member interests but instead by recognising that the first duty of a professional body is to serve the profession itself and all of its many and varied stakeholders.

We understand that, across the sector, there are valuable relationships currently being used for narrow benefit that could be developed to serve the greater good.

First and foremost, this new Manifesto is about collaboration. It sets out a vision and a series of initiatives that encourage working together to achieve key outcomes. In working to bring about those defined outcomes, all organisations within the sector would maintain full autonomy and retain their own individual identity and traditions while at the same time striving to achieve for the good of all.

Emma Shaw CSyP: chairman of The Security Institute

Emma Shaw CSyP: chairman of The Security Institute

A Manifesto for Professional Security: The Background

Undoubtedly, these are times of immense and rapid change for the security profession and all of its practitioners. The nature of the security threat is changing. Accessible information technologies, global networks, diversification of threats and disruptive technologies will all create risks for the public, for society and for businesses in equal measure. These complex threats require complex solutions and, in turn, this will demand far greater collaboration and co-operation from – and between – those responsible for the security of assets as well as the host organisations representing them.

We also need to remember that it’s not only security professionals who are our stakeholders. Ultimately, the end user of all our services is the general public and The Security Institute feels that not enough has been done to include that public in our thinking as a profession.

There’s a need for greater understanding of what the public perceives as threats, which tend towards the local and short term rather than the international and longer term focus of the Government’s National Security Strategy. Through its professional bodies, the security profession must strive to build bridges with the public it seeks to protect. It is the members of the public who are our primary stakeholders.

Following on from this, security also must engage more actively with its user stakeholders in a bid to demystify its practices and make its own case for wider recognition as a force for good in society. On an individual level, security must strive to promote a clear understanding and appreciation of the things the security profession does on a daily basis to maintain stakeholder well-being.

At a time when security is becoming ever more ubiquitous and might be perceived by some as overbearing, we absolutely cannot afford to let the public lose faith in the professionals who work tirelessly to manage and mitigate the risks it faces and, in so doing, keep members of the public safe.

In the pursuit of greater degrees of security, it must be said that a fine line exists between protecting members of the public and infringing their civil liberties. Here, the security profession has the opportunity to be a reassuring and independent presence between the public and the legislature. We can offer a reliable information channel.

Taking this argument a stage further, the security profession has to encourage an ongoing debate around the moral basis of security. It’s also fair to say that ethical challenges will frequently arise as technology empowers the profession to gather, analyse and use data about citizens.

The Security Institute has launched 'A Manifesto for Professional Security'

The Security Institute has launched ‘A Manifesto for Professional Security’

The security profession must evolve

The Institute feels strongly that the security profession must evolve in line with the changing nature of risks and equip practitioners to cope with those risks in order to enable them to meet the challenges facing society at large. Technology is one of the key drivers of change, and the security profession – and its cohort – needs to demonstrate the technical and intellectual skills that enable effective working within this environment.

New tools can help transform the sector. For example, big data analytics might be made into working tools, enabling complex data to be turned into smart data and allowing data analysis on a massive scale that quickly provides deeper insights while creating new types of services for host organisations.

We should also consider the make-up of the security profession. Security is still widely viewed as a second career for those coming out of the military or the police service. We need to encourage young people to enter the security world as a first-choice profession after leaving school or university.

Greater and closer co-operation between stakeholder organisations is essential if we are all to fulfil our individual organisational obligations to the profession.

What, then, are the reasons why things we would all agree need to be done are not being done? First, it’s apparent to many of us that ‘Security’ simply doesn’t speak the language of business or the public effectively and so doesn’t participate in the conversations that frequently set the agenda.

Second, one of the strengths of the security sector is the engagement of its members and the vibrant groups, associations and institutes they establish – but this is also its weakness. The security sector is fragmented and lacking in clear leadership.

We also believe that the nature of the relationship between the profession and the public should change. ‘Security’ needs to develop a relationship with the public whereby the users are the ones demanding the services rather than having services they haven’t asked for imposed upon them.

Returning once more to the key theme of collaboration and co-operation, The Security Institute feels there’s an overriding need for a true and sustaining partnership between the security profession, businesses and institutions and the general public.

The Front Cover of the new 'Manifesto for Professional Security'

The Front Cover of the new ‘Manifesto for Professional Security’

Setting aside parochial interests

The Manifesto asks a number of things of various stakeholders within this profession and those who have influence over it. However diverse, large or small they may be, we call upon all of the professional bodies in this industry to set aside any parochial interests and join with us in working independently and in parallel for the benefit of our profession, our industry and our society.

We call on educational bodies and awarding bodies to join with the professional bodies and examine the future development of structured learning programmes designed to up-skill the security workforce.

We call upon key commercial organisations to work with the professional bodies and provide the funding and support that some of these initiatives will entail.

We call upon Parliament and its many agencies to establish an enabling, meaningful and ongoing dialogue with the profession to ensure it develops in a manner that’s entirely consistent with the needs of Government and society.

To achieve this, the Manifesto proposes a number of initiatives that we – the professional bodies and member associations in the security sector – can establish through working together.

We encourage thoughtful and dynamic collaboration between groups, businesses and individuals. We believe we should establish a Security Commonwealth wherein all organisations come together on an equal basis, retaining their full individual autonomy while working collectively on the development of common approaches to joint challenges

We propose that we should work collaboratively with all willing groups and individuals within the industry to set up a Security Information Service. This will afford the public general advice via a website – ideally sponsored by the industry and, possibly, Government – on all aspects of personal, domestic, travel and cyber security. This can be used to steer public opinion in a favourable direction.

The Security Information Service will share information on how professional security succeeds at major events, such as the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, as well as on a day-to-day basis in peoples’ lives, for instance when they’re at the shops or using public transport. We will celebrate the achievements of those working for the public and support measures to address the abuse and misuse of security.

We wish to work together to improve and heighten the profile of the sector. The Security Institute encourages collaboration with universities and education providers, schools and university careers services and employers. We want to establish clear career paths that demonstrate progress from first entering the profession to roles in the top strata via specialist and generalist positions, technical and business roles.

Put simply, we need to show security to be the challenging, intellectually stimulating, exciting and public-serving discipline that it most certainly is. We can do this through the medium of a Security Careers Advisory Service.

The Foreword is written by Lord Carlile of Berriew, The Security Institute's president

The Foreword is written by Lord Carlile of Berriew CBE QC, The Security Institute’s president

Common position on professionalism

We want to work together on developing and sharing a common position on professionalism within our industry. Our joint aim should be the UK becoming the exemplar model that the world can copy. We can create a Working Group, entitled Security Outreach, and target this outreach to opinion formers, politicians and management organisations such as the CBI and the Institute of Directors. We can increase awareness through the Human Resources profession, the purchasing and supply function and Facilities Management, all of which are key enablers in our area.

We act together to promote The Gold Standard created by The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals, that of the Chartered Security Professional. We act in unison with other industry bodies to create a common point of view and voice that we will use to approach Government with clearly thought-out suggestions designed to encourage and influence the development of a Government White Paper on the future of the security profession. Security Outreach will play a key role in this process.

To ensure that our voice is heard we propose the creation of a Joint Security Associations’ Lobbying Group that would speak on behalf of all the associations – and through them – when representing the profession and its members.

There’s full recognition that this is an ambitious manifesto and requires all stakeholders in the security sector – the associations, the trade bodies, members of the press and individual members – to come together and work effectively for the good of the security profession.

Let’s recognise that we have a great deal in common and that, first and foremost, all bodies in the sector were established to support the members of this profession. There’s much we can and will continue to offer as individual associations, but let’s be brave enough to recognise that there will be many occasions when, if we are to be truly effective, the fact is we are better together, speaking with one voice and promoting a common viewpoint with the weight of our individual organisations firmly behind us.

We recognise that our ambition for the development of the profession is beyond the ability and resources of any one group, organisation or professional association within the sector. We realise that there are many perspectives on the future of the security profession and the broader sector, and that there are informed voices outside of our organisation who can claim thought leadership.

Strong contribution to the sector

We have no wish to necessarily lead these initiatives but undertake to work tirelessly to get them off the ground and to give them our full and continuing support as a willing participant. Indeed, so determined are we to make them a reality that we’re ready to contemplate a future in which The Security Institute itself may cease to exist in its present form and would possibly be subsumed within a larger, more representative grouping that carries greater authority through its universality.

As a professional body, The Security Institute is rightly proud of its journey over the past 15 years. The organisation has made a strong contribution to the sector. However, if this Manifesto meets with an enthusiastic response from other organisations, and we’re able to use its contents in bringing greater cohesion to the profession at large, then this will be our finest achievement to date.

Winston Churchill once famously stated: “I never worry about action, but only inaction.” Together, we have an opportunity before us to start something that’s truly great. Let’s not allow that opportunity to be brought to a halt through inaction. Work with The Security Institute to make it so.

*Read ‘Recognised, Respected and Professional: A Manifesto for Professional Security

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The Security Institute launches ‘A Manifesto for Professional Security’

The Security Institute – the UK’s largest membership body for security professionals – launched its ‘Manifesto for Professional Security’ on Tuesday 18 November at the Churchill War Rooms in London.

The Security Institute’s vision is to make professional security more effective – recognised and respected for the value it delivers to society, to organisations in both the public and private sector and to individual members of the public.

The Institute firmly believes that professional security has the opportunity and the responsibility to play a full role in addressing the challenges and security risks of the future. The organisation’s vision is that the sector as a whole should become recognised, respected and seen as professional by Government, the business world and the public at large. On that basis, the ‘Manifesto for Professional Security’ sets out what The Security Institute is going to do to make this change happen.

The Security Institute commented: “This is an ambitious Manifesto and requires all stakeholders in this sector – the associations, the trade bodies, the press and the memberships – to come together and work effectively for the good of the profession.”

The Security Institute has launched 'A Manifesto for Professional Security'

The Security Institute has launched ‘A Manifesto for Professional Security’

Needs of Government and society at large

An official statement continued:

(1) We call on all professional bodies in this industry, however diverse, however large or small to be more outward looking and join with us in working independently and together for the benefit of our profession, the benefit of our industry and the benefit of our society

(2) We call on education bodies to join with us to examine the future development of structured learning programmes designed to upskill the security workforce

(3) We call upon key commercial organisations to work with us to provide the funding and support that some of these initiatives will entail

(4) We call upon Government and its many agencies to establish an enabling, meaningful and ongoing dialogue with the profession to ensure it develops in a way that’s entirely consistent with the needs of Government and society

Security Institute chairman Emma Shaw CSyP commented: “We are proud to present our ‘Manifesto for Professional Security’ to the security community. This is a time of immense change, innovation and development within the security sector. Some of the changes are driven by technology, some by external events and some through innovative approaches via the constant quest to always remain one step ahead of those who would interfere with our safety. Our Manifesto is a call for closer co-operation and collaboration between the professional bodies, the forums and networks within the security sector. We ask you to work with us to make security a profession of which we can be proud. One that is forward-looking, influential and an aspirational career choice for ambitious young people.”

Emma Shaw CSyP: chairman of The Security Institute

Emma Shaw CSyP: chairman of The Security Institute

The ‘Manifesto for Professional Security’ can be downloaded at: https://www.security-institute.org/About_Us/syi_manifesto

Art and science of security management

The Security Institute is a not-for-profit organisation established in 1999 for the benefit of individuals working in the security sector. It promotes the art and science of security management and works to drive standards, educate and spread Best Practice across the security sector – a sector responsible for the safety of much of the UK’s Critical National Infrastructure.

The Institute is responsible for managing and operating the Register of Chartered Security Professionals on behalf of The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals. In conjunction with the Registration Authority it sets standards, provides quality control, appointment and management of licensees and admitted registrants.

The Register of Chartered Security Professionals

The Register of Chartered Security Professionals was launched on 7 June 2011. Established under Royal Charter by The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals, the Register itself endorses the main aim of the Company which is: “To promote, support and encourage standards of excellence, integrity and honourable practice in conducting the profession of security practitioners and to aid societies and other organisations connected to such a profession.”

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Consec 2014 highlights overriding need for true analysis of business risks

Held on Thursday 2 October, Consec 2014 – the Association of Security Consultants’ Annual Conference – ran under the banner ‘Securing Business, Protecting the Future’ and highlighted the overriding need for a true analysis of risks and necessary solutions rather than business professionals relying on simplistic reports and common assumptions. There was also consideration around developing effective strategies for tackling today’s myriad cyber threats and the importance of being able to rely on quality products and services in the ongoing fight against criminality.

Over 150 delegates representing security suppliers and end user organisations attended the event, which was held at the London Heathrow Marriott Hotel. It was the Association of Security Consultants’ (ASC) 20th Annual Conference and Exhibition, with the conference proceedings expertly chaired by Security Industry Authority chairman Elizabeth France CBE.

In his opening keynote address, Professor Michael Clarke (director general at the Royal United Services Institute) outlined key factors influencing current global threats. These include demographic trends, climatic events resulting in population movement, regional tensions, the growth of virtual communications, a significant level of financial assets being out of reach of state jurisdiction, economic hardship and resulting migration and the takeover of liberal revolution by fundamentalist elements.

Consec 2014 was attended by over 150 delegates representing security solutions suppliers and end user organisations

Consec 2014 was attended by over 150 delegates representing security solutions suppliers and end user organisations

Paul Easter – managing director at Harquebus and 2014 Imbert Prize winner – sought to dispel some common misconceptions around terrorist capabilities. Easter stressed that these capabilities are typically conventional from a technology point of view, and that terrorists have generally not succeeded in using the Internet as a cyber weapon while they also remain a long way off from being able to pose a nuclear threat.

According to Easter, terrorists’ abilities to use more advanced methods of attack are dependent on state assistance. This is very often non-existent or otherwise limited.

Tackling the cyber threat

Sue Seaby – director at SAS Security Risk Service – explained why tackling the cyber threat should be an exercise carried out as part of an integrated plan for dealing with all threats and involve each risk discipline rather than cyber being treated as something special.

Seaby added that Boards of Directors need to be educated against being swayed on risk policy dependent on media coverage at any given time, and feels there should be greater recognition of the scale of the insider threat to information security. Apparently, 80%-85% of all data breaches are committed by members of staff, either inadvertently or deliberately.

Both Seaby and Jane Attwood (representing the John Taylor International Partnership) focused on the importance of organisations ensuring that their suppliers – as well as their employees – follow appropriate procedures specifically designed to minimise risk.

Sue Seaby of SAS Security Risk Service speaking at Consec 2014

Sue Seaby of SAS Security Risk Service speaking at Consec 2014

Attwood, who is also a member of the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) Defence and Security Committee, outlined the findings of recent LCCI research on cyber security. 54% of London businesses have been the victim of cyber crime in the last 12 months. The main barriers to improved protection are the perceived high cost (the response received from 34% of those questioned as part of the research) and a lack of threat awareness (30%).

LCCI recommendations include making it simpler for businesses to know where to go for advice and the availability of the Innovation Voucher for cyber security on a continuous basis to help SMEs bring in outside expertise.

UK Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research

Dr Tristram Riley-Smith – external champion to the UK Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research at Cambridge University – explained that, despite a perception that information security is all about technology, probably the most important element in cyber research focuses on human behaviour. A high proportion of risks may be minimised if Best Practice techniques are followed.

The UK Partnership is a national research programme aimed at improving our understanding of current and future security challenges. To date, over 1,200 projects have been energised.

Dr Riley-Smith’s prime mission is “to see value extracted from the university world and delivered to the people who can do something with it”. He cited a number of examples, including making the link between ‘lucky imaging’ techniques from astronomy and improving the resolution quality of surveillance systems installed for operational crime prevention and detection.

It’s estimated that the global security market will rise in value from £410 billion in 2012 to £571 billion by 2016. Dr Riley-Smith said that the goal was for the UK’s share of security exports to rise from 4% to 8% by 2020.

Dr Tristram Riley-Smith spoke about the UK Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research

Dr Tristram Riley-Smith spoke about the UK Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research

Following this theme, Stephen Phipson CBE – director of security industry engagement with Her Majesty’s Government – then outlined his own work designed to support various activities across Government. Led by the UKTI and heavily promoting security exports, this work has already built on the UK’s delivery of a safe and secure London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Phipson’s key role involves co-ordinating the interaction between Government and the UK’s security sector and, during his presentation, he duly stressed the importance of being able to rely on high standards from the organisations the Government’s export initiatives are designed to support.

Chartered Security Professional certification scheme

Di Thomas, membership engagement manager at The Security Institute, continued the theme of standards with her summary of the Chartered Security Professional certification scheme.

The 75th practitioner to gain the prestigious status of Chartered Security Professional is Bob Martin, an ASC Board member. Bob’s achievement was marked with an official certificate presentation ceremony at Consec 2014.

Summing up the day, Allan Hildage – the ASC’s chairman – said: “This year’s Consec proved to be yet another informative and worthwhile conference where our delegates were fortunate to hear some outstanding presentations delivered by security and risk expert leaders from across Government, academia and industry.”

*Further information on research projects being enabled via the UK Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research and RISC is available online at: http://www.riscuk.org/academia/academic-marketplace/

**The LCCI report ‘Cyber Secure: Making London Business Safe Against Online Crime’ is available online at: http://www.londonchamber.co.uk

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The Security Institute unveils plans to work with CPNI

The Security Institute, the UK’s largest membership body for security professionals, has announced a working relationship with the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) designed specifically to promote security professionalism.

The Security Institute will now collaborate with the CPNI and help identify opportunities to promote professionalism in the security business sector in the areas of physical, personal, cyber and information security with the overall aim of raising standards. This may include opportunities relating to education, research and the distribution of advice and guidance.

Institute chairman Emma Shaw CSyP commented: “I’m delighted to announce this initiative and look forward to working with the CPNI on driving forward professional standards. This year is the 15th Anniversary of The Security Institute and, during our time of operation, we have helped define and move forward the agenda for growing professionalism within the security sector.”

The Security Institute has announced plans for joint working with the CPNI

The Security Institute has announced plans for joint working with the CPNI

The Security Institute now boasts the highest number of members in its history and over 1,000 students have completed the organisation’s distance learning qualifications. Indeed, 2014 will see the largest number of students studying in any one year.

Shaw continued: “We were instrumental in the development of The Register of Chartered Security Professionals which was created by The Security Institute in 2011 on behalf of The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals. Applicants have to go through a rigorous staged assessment process which is why this represents ‘The Gold Standard’ in professionalism for the sector.”

In conclusion, Shaw stated: “The Security Institute’s membership continues to grow. We plan to launch a Professional Development Framework later this year which will assist anyone working within the profession to develop their skills.”

The UK’s national infrastructure: the detail 

The UK’s national infrastructure is defined by the Government as: “Those facilities, systems, sites and networks necessary for the functioning of the country and the delivery of the essential services upon which daily life in the UK depends.” The national infrastructure is categorised into nine sectors: Communications, Emergency Services, Energy, Financial Services, Food, Government, Health, Transport and Water.

There are some cross-sector themes such as technology wherein there may be infrastructure which supports the delivery of essential services across a number of sectors.

Infrastructure is characterised according to its value or ‘criticality’ and the impact of its loss. This categorisation is completed using the Government’s Criticality Scale which assigns categories for different degrees of severity of impact.

Not everything within a national infrastructure sector is ‘critical’. Within the sectors there are certain ‘critical’ elements of infrastructure, the loss or compromise of which would have a major detrimental impact on the availability or integrity of essential services and potentially lead to severe economic or social consequences or even loss of life.

These ‘critical’ assets coprise the nation’s Critical National Infrastructure (CNI) and are individually referred to as ‘infrastructure assets’. Infrastructure assets may be physical (eg sites, installations or elements of equipment) or logical (for instance information networks and systems).

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The Security Institute celebrates The Register of Chartered Security Professionals at House of Commons event

Following on from last year’s sell-out inaugural event at the House of Lords, entrants on The Register of Chartered Security Professionals and Members and Fellows of The Security Institute once again gathered to celebrate the continuing growth and success of the Register.

The Annual CSyP Dinner was held at the House of Commons on Tuesday 20 March 2014, with over 140 guests in attendance.

The Register of Chartered Security Professionals was created by The Security Institute on behalf of The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals (WCoSP) in 2011. Since then, WCoSP Past-Masters Peter French MBE and Don Randall MBE have worked closely with the Institute to support the Register’s ongoing development.

French and Randall both attended the dinner, alongside the current Master of The Worshipful Company (Group Captain Brian Hughes FSyI) and Barrie Stewart FSyI, Middle Warden.

New Chartered Security Professionals (Left to Right): Grahame Bullock, Simon Whitehouse, Denis Fischbacher-Smith, Peter Whettingsteel, Robb Cumming, Lord Alex Carlile (President of The Security Institute), Simon Pears, Simon Roberts, Peter Kaye and Stephen Ackroyd

New Chartered Security Professionals (Left to Right): Grahame Bullock, Simon Whitehouse, Denis Fischbacher-Smith, Peter Whettingsteel, Robb Cumming, Lord Alex Carlile (President of The Security Institute), Simon Pears, Simon Roberts, Peter Kaye and Stephen Ackroyd

The Security Institute organised the event on behalf of the Register. The Institute was represented at the event by Chairman Emma Shaw CSyP, Vice-Presidents Mike Bluestone CSyP and Bill Wyllie CSyP, Advisory Board member Baroness Ruth Henig DL, Institute Deputy Chairman Garry Evanson CSyP and the Registrar charged with admitting the successful Register applicants, David Gill CSyP.

The annual event is an opportunity to introduce the quality the Register represents to other organisations that are impacted by the security profession and will benefit from the ‘Gold Standard’ that the Register epitomises. Applicants have to go through a rigorous staged assessment process and prove they have reached a minimum competence level in each of five defined areas – knowledge, practice skills, leadership, communications and professional commitment. Once admitted, they are permitted to use the prestigious CSyP post-nominal.

Presentation of Certificates of Admittance

Prior to dinner, Certificates of Admittance were presented to nine new Chartered Security Professionals.

The successful Registrants are: Stephen Ackroyd (Aviation Security Consultant), Grahame Bullock (Nexen Petroleum UK), Robb Cumming (Technip), Professor Denis Fischbacher-Smith (Glasgow University), Peter Kaye (Pilgrims Group), Simon Pears (Sodexo), Simon Roberts (DHL), Peter Whettingsteel (MFD International) and Simon Whitehouse (SGW Safety & Security).

Lord Carlile CBE QC gave an update on the latest activity from the Register, acknowledging the appointment of ASIS UK as Licensees of the Register and announcing that the Register has doubled its application rate since last year. He also shared some of his personal knowledge and history of the House of Commons.

Charles Farr OBE, Director of the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism, was the guest speaker and shared his thoughts about the future of security and counter-terrorism in the UK.

Left to Right: Emma Shaw CSyP, Lady Carlile and Lord Alex Carlile CBE QC

Left to Right: Emma Shaw CSyP, Lady Carlile and Lord Alex Carlile CBE QC

Emma Shaw, Chairman of The Security Institute and herself a Registered Chartered Security Professional, commented: “I am incredibly proud of what the Register has achieved in just three years and delighted that it continues to attract interest from across the world. It’s a significant factor in our ongoing efforts to raise standards and enhance the perception of the security profession – something that benefits us all.”

Shaw continued: “The Chartered Security Professionals Annual Dinner at the House of Commons is a great opportunity for the Register to celebrate its success and raise its profile even further within the wider business and Governmental communities. The Register continues to play a vital role in The Security Institute’s mission to make security a profession that is considered to be on a par with disciplines such as law, education, medicine, accountancy and engineering.”

*The event was generously sponsored by Dallmeier and Pilgrims Group

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Dr Peter Speight is first to gain CSyP via ASIS UK route

Earlier this month, Dr Peter Speight CSyP became the first person to gain admittance to the Register of Chartered Security Professionals via the ASIS UK route.

ASIS International’s UK Chapter held its Summer Meeting in central London on 12 June, the event being attended by 147 members and guests.

At that gathering, Dr Peter Speight CSyP – director of security risk management at Securitas Security Services UK – became the first person to gain admittance to the Register of Chartered Security Professionals via the ASIS UK route.

Peter received his CSyP tie and lapel pin from Sharon Williams CSyP, who is the ASIS UK Chapter’s representative on the Chartered Security Professionals Registration Authority.

Dr Peter Speight CSyP

Dr Peter Speight CSyP

This development is very significant because, although there are already 15 ASIS members who have achieved CSyP status (about a third of the total cohort to date), Peter is the first to achieve this via ASIS UK (who became the second licensee of the register earlier this year alongside The Security Institute).

Most of the ASIS CSyPs also hold the CPP certification, which further demonstrates the value of CPP.

If you’re interested in becoming a CSyP, please contact the ASIS UK office via e-mail at: info@asis.org.uk

Why Security Fails

On Wednesday of this week, Peter Speight took part in a live Audio Show hosted by http://www.IFSECGlobal.com in which he discussed ‘Why Security Fails’ – the subject of his 2012 book of the same name – with Brian Sims, UBM Live’s media solutions manager across the company’s security and fire portfolio.

If you missed the broadcast you can register to view retrospectively.

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