Tag Archives: Procurement

Chubb wins fire and security systems contract with retail giant Tesco

Chubb Fire and Security has secured a new contract with retail giant Tesco to service and maintain fire extinguishers and security systems in UK stores and at Tesco’s head office, as well as the fire extinguishers present in the business’ distribution centres.

The UK’s largest retailer with over 2,600 stores, Tesco has worked with Chubb for a number of years now, using its FX range of fire extinguishers. With this new contract, Chubb will also provide intruder alarm maintenance services for half of Tesco’s estate.

John Simons, the property procurement manager at Tesco, said it was logical to explore the advantages of a combined fire and security contract.

ChubbTesco

“In choosing a service provider,” outlined Simons, “we look for three things: technical ability, sufficient infrastructure and support to deliver a nationwide contract and value for money.”

Chubb complies with strict Service Level Agreements that ensure maintenance is carried out and calls are responded to within a specified period of time. In addition, engineers sign in and out of all site visits electronically, giving Tesco real-time visibility of engineer attendance as well as the reassurance that systems are fully maintained.

“Given the number of sites involved in this contract, good communication, collaboration and thorough organisation are essential, as well as a willingness to adopt our own procedures such as our electronic sign-in system,” added Simons.

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Chubb wins fire extinguisher maintenance contract for Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust

Chubb Fire & Security has secured a new contract to provide fire extinguisher maintenance services at more than 50 sites belonging to or managed by the Derbyshire Community Health Services (DCHS) NHS Foundation Trust.

Hospitals, private general practitioner offices, health centres and dental surgeries are all included in the three-year contract.

As part of the agreement, Chubb will ensure that more than 1,500 fire extinguishers and fire blankets are regularly serviced and maintained to British Standards in order to protect patients, employees and assets.

chubbfireextinguisher

“We’ve worked with Chubb previously and it’s good to be working with the company again,” said Emma Morten, procurement officer at DCHS. “The sales team and engineers are superb. There has been a seamless process from signing the contract to mobilisation.”

On being awarded the contract, Chubb serviced all of the fire extinguishers at each site.

“The contract is flexible and we’re continually adding sites at very short notice,” continued Morten. “This is a great advantage to us.”

DCHS provides care for more than 4,000 patients every day in 13 community hospitals and 28 health centres. It’s one of the largest providers of specialist community health services in the country, serving a patient population of more than one million.

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BSIA issues White Paper on Information Destruction and revised guidance on Lone Working

The British Security Industry Association (BSIA) and its Information Destruction Section has announce the publication of a White Paper designed to be used as a guide for public sector agencies and any organisation wishing to benchmark against that sector and provide the correct protocols in the destruction of sensitive items and materials.

The guide references previously published guidance documents from the Cabinet Office and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) in order to promote the required specifications for data destruction and the importance of secure information destruction.

Entitled Information Destruction in the Public Sector, the document specifies which sensitive materials should be securely destroyed. Furthermore, it defines the varying levels of secure information and documents that should be disposed of in the appropriate manner.

Threat profiles are assessed and analysed in tiers of severity, while the White Paper also affords organisations guidance on specifying the desired outcomes that information destruction should produce.

Adam Chandler, chairman of the BSIA’s Information Destruction Section, has expressed how the White Paper might serve private sector companies and the public sector as a whole.

The security of information is an issue of paramount importance in the 21st Century,” asserted Chandler. “Data breaches can be more than costly. They can ruin a Government’s credibility as well as a private sector company’s reputation. British organisations must fortify their infrastructure by ensuring standards are upheld and that data is adequately disposed of. By adhering to the standards set by the Government and referenced by the BSIA in this White Paper; citizens, employees and civil servants will be better protected.”

*Download the guide in full at: http://www.bsia.co.uk/publications/publications-search-results/257-information-destruction-in-the-public-sector.aspx

BSIA publishes revised lone worker guidance documents

The BSIA has also just published revisions to two of its lone worker guides.

The revisions have been made to Form 144: A Guide to Buying a Lone Worker Service and Form 288: Lone Workers – An Employer’s Guide in order to reflect recent changes in the lone worker services market.

Form 144: A Guide to Buying a Lone Worker Service provides end users with advice on how to go about procuring a lone worker service that will be right for their business and what information needs to be prepared before a potential supplier is approached.

Form 288: Lone Workers – An Employer’s Guide provides employers with essential information about their responsibilities towards their lone workers as well as detail around what they should expect from a lone worker device, its supplier, an Alarm Receiving Centre and the response.

Steve Lampett, technical officer at the BSIA, explained: “The BSIA’s Lone Worker Section decided to update these very useful guides to reflect changes within the lone worker services market. While many of these changes are minor routine amendments, educating the marketplace is a key objective of the Association. On that basis, ensuring industry guidance is up to date is of vital importance.”

Amendments to the guides include the following:

Form 144: A Guide to Buying a Lone Worker Service

  • Reflection of the new requirement placed on the supplier highlighting the need to be flexible in terms of alarm escalation contacts (including at different times of the day/week, escalation and prioritisation processes)
  • Inclusion of a greater emphasis on the supplier to provide ongoing training options for the customer

Form 288: Lone Workers – An Employer’s Guide

  • Changes from BS 8484:2009 to BS 8484:2011
  • Addition of the provision for using the services of BS 8591 Category 2 Alarm Receiving Centres
  • Health and Safety Executive guidance updates
  • Reflecting the name change of the Association of Chief Police Officers by replacing it with the National Police Chiefs’ Council

Craig Swallow, chairman of the BSIA’s dedicated Lone Worker Section, stated: “We wanted to ensure that our guidance remains up to date and continues to be useful for end users to refer to when procuring a lone worker service. The Section therefore felt it necessary to update both Form 144 and Form 288. We expect further changes will need to be made to these forms and other BSIA lone worker publications when the current revision of BS 8484 has been completed in 2016.”

*The updated versions of Form 144 and 288 are available to download free of charge from the BSIA’s website: www.bsia.co.uk

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What does the future hold for Fire and Rescue Services?

Everyone engaged in the Fire and Rescue sector will be acutely aware that fundamental changes are already taking place to the UK’s Fire and Rescue Services, prompted largely by the need to deliver a more cost-effective service, reports the Fire Industry Association.

What’s clear is that the Fire and Rescue Services’ collective mode of operation will be very different in just a few years’ time than it is now, and that several key strands of this evolution will be determined by a co-operative partnership between the Fire and Rescue Services and the suppliers to the sector.

Following the publication of Sir Ken Knight’s ‘Facing The Future’ report in 2013, which highlighted a number of options for change, central Government has made clear its support for some strands of the thesis detailed including collaborative procurement, infrastructure sharing, mergers and a greater proportion of on-call fire fighters.

Material support has come from Government in the form of a £75 million ‘transformation fund’ that has been apportioned towards 37 efficiency-generating projects and, within this, £5.5 million to help fund the forthcoming merger of the Wiltshire and Dorset Fire and Rescue Services.

What has been apparent for some time, however, is that change is to be sector-driven and delivered and that this truism will require fire-fighting equipment suppliers to be fully engaged in relevant aspects of the evolution.

Sir Ken Knight

Sir Ken Knight

A Memorandum of Understanding signed by the Chief Fire Officers Association (CFOA) and FIRESA Council earlier this year has proven timely. Among the commitments that have already been realised was the convening of a joint seminar that has provided an indispensable focal point for the collaboration of fire and rescue practitioners with their product and service providers.

Taking place at the Fire Service College on 2 December, the seminar allowed delegates to enjoy an informative and thought-provoking agenda that brought the salient issues into focus and will empower both Fire and Rescue Service personnel and industry suppliers to be active participants in the future of our Fire and Rescue Services.

Chaired by CFOA president Peter Dartford, the programme began with a welcome from the host, Fire Service College CEO Jez Smith, who set the background for the day, duly noting the need for avoidance of duplication among the Fire and Rescue Services and the creation of economies of scale wherever possible.

The Fire Service College itself has a vital role to play in partnership with other stakeholders, and Smith called for bold leadership within the Fire and Rescue Services that will challenge existing disparate practices.

New ways of thinking and resourcing

Fire Minister Penny Mordaunt provided the Keynote Address, welcoming the CFOA/FIRESA Council Memorandum of Understanding before stating that the public sector has to exist within its means and that there must be new ways of thinking and resourcing.

Mordaunt is adamant that the need for change is overwhelming and that the pace of change must gather momentum and address issues such as product standardisation, collaborative procurement and equipment testing through the CFOA/FIRESA Council axis.

Penny Mordaunt MP

Penny Mordaunt MP

The MP also touched on Fire and Rescue Service personnel issues such as on-call fire-fighters and volunteers, and also looked to the fire protection industry to continue driving down the number of unwanted automatic fire alarm signals.

CFOA vice-president Paul Hancock encapsulated the theme of the day in his presentation entitled ‘The Importance of Working Together’, voicing strong support not just for Fire and Rescue Service collaboration but also for ‘Blue Light’ cross fertilisation (which we know to be a longer term vision of the present coalition Government).

Hancock suggested that, with less than half of the austerity measures currently implemented, the way ahead will require close working partnerships that promote a clear vision with or without direct Government involvement.

CFOA Board member Ann Millington offered a strident and entertaining view on procurement in the future, conceding that the Fire and Rescue Services need to be better clients and grasp opportunities to work together. The Fire and Rescue Services, said Millington, must achieve reward for collaboration rather than for separatism.

Importantly, Millington welcomed the creation of a ‘national back office’ that presently enjoys representation from 30 Fire and Rescue Services.

Ann Millington is firmly behind product standardisation, greater visibility of equipment innovation requirements and a whole new approach to procurement that begins with agreed specifications and proceeds towards tender with sufficiently flexible contracts via a lead authority for each product type.

In Anne’s words, repetition of these processes over 46 Fire and Rescue Services is immoral. Indeed, Millington was especially scathing of the ever-growing number of contract providers and the duplicate frameworks that emerge which are so costly and time-consuming for suppliers to address.

Creation and development of strategic partnerships

Pivotal to the proceedings was the presentation from the suppliers’ perspective given by FIRESA Council’s chairman Derek Gotts and vice-chairman Ian Callaghan. Following an introduction to the composition and work of Council, Gotts noted its primary objectives which focus on strategic partnerships with CFOA and the Fire and Rescue Services, the Fire Sector Federation, the Fire Service College, central and local Government in addition to a range of event organisers.

Gotts then moved on to the suppliers’ experience of the market over the last ten years which has seen the ultimately failing National Procurement Strategy (introduced by the then ODPM in 2005), through the austerity measures since 2010 and via Sir Ken Knight’s report to the present time of tangible moves to make substantive changes that must preserve Fire and Rescue Service capabilities with less financial resource in play.

The National Procurement Strategy brought uncertainty and a hiatus in orders and, contrary to its intentions, led to a market that sees a growing profusion of frameworks and tenders, mini competitions and framework call-offs that are as onerous as new tenders. What remains is a disjointed approach comprising elements of regional and local procurement. There’s clear evidence of duplication in many aspects of the Fire and Rescue Service/supplier interface and unnecessary waste in terms of both personnel and financial resource that must be rectified.

Graham Ellicott: CEO at the Fire Industry Association

Graham Ellicott: CEO at the Fire Industry Association

Ian Callaghan went on to detail the FIRESA Council/CFOA Memorandum of Understanding and some specific issues that Council wishes to address, among them support for product innovation, collaborative procurement (including visibility of medium-to-long term requirements), equipment specification and standardisation and remaining influential in coalition and opposition fire safety policy stretching to proposals for joint ‘Blue Light’ operations.

In particular, Callaghan emphasised the equipment evaluation scheme which seeks to eliminate what is a frankly ludicrous situation, and a prime example of duplication whereby each Fire and Rescue Service carries out its own independent assessments. Backed by output-based national specifications, suppliers envisage an open and transparent model that’s divorced from any specific procurement processes and, importantly, is dynamic, in turn enabling modified and new equipment to be evaluated as required.

Perhaps headed by a Technical Committee and with work carried out by product type by appropriate lead organisations, the aim is to establish a library of rigorous test reports that, rather than promoting a ‘winner takes all’ link to procurement, enables each Fire and Rescue Service to reach its own judgement on its preferred product from a technical and users’ standpoint.

Perspective from local Government

An Open Forum following the morning session proved lively and impassioned. While it’s not possible to recount the discussions in detail here, what became evident to all in attendance is that if, being in the real world, there will be significant challenges in getting to that better place we anticipate, there’s both the will and the vision to lead us there.

The agenda for the afternoon began with Councillor Mark Healey of the LGA Fire Services Management Committee offering a local Government perspective and a fascinating view on the realities of what the Authorities have to do in response to funding cuts. He suggested that a lack of central Government direction has created a policy vacuum that’s being filled with individual solutions.

Healey’s Devon and Somerset Fire Authority enjoys a good relationship with its Fire and Rescue Service and has already made a number of changes, including moving towards more on-call fire fighters, investing in light rescue pumps and, following the merger, making long term revenue-generating use of its unoccupied sites.

Given the likelihood of further Fire and Rescue Service mergers in the future, the address from ACO Robert Scott of the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service proved an invaluable insight into the amalgamation of the previously separate services north of the border.

While its capital budget has grown from £15 million to over £22 million (although VAT can no longer be reclaimed), there were significant criteria attached to the merger including no front line redundancies or station closures, no alterations to personnel Terms and Conditions and no carry-over of financial reserves.

Scott was able to report, however, that many duplications have been eliminated and that the combined Fire and Rescue Service is proceeding with future business planning and restructuring that will achieve further efficiencies. His message to the audience was that, while the positions of the English and Welsh Fire and Rescue Services were their own to evaluate and respond to as they see fit, they would do well to shape their own futures before Government imposes its will upon them.

David Matthews, a renowned expert in the field of global standards in fire and rescue, offered an appraisal of the current position and called vehemently for greater Fire and Rescue Service involvement in the various Standards Committees.

The formal programme was completed by CFO Paul Fuller who spoke of the work of the Fire Sector Federation (which is achieving notable outputs through its various work streams).

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Fire minister calls for smarter procurement across Fire and Rescue Services

Fire and Rescue Services across the country could save millions of pounds in taxpayers’ cash by improving the way in which they source and purchase fire-fighting equipment and clothing. That’s the verdict of the latest research published by the Department for Communities and Local Government.

Research findings in the 82-page Fire and Rescue Procurement Aggregation and Collaboration document highlight examples of Fire Services buying identical kit at vastly different prices, with the report stating that, across the country, the 46 Fire and Rescue Services could save millions by streamlining processes and standardising ways in which they buy clothing and equipment.

Prices for the same kit can vary by as much as 200%. For example, a fire helmet can cost between £105 and £131 but even when the same contract is used there can still be a significant price range of 66%. A typical fire protection coat can cost anywhere between £220 and £366.

The report concludes that Fire and Rescue Authorities could achieve savings of no less than £18 million from a total spend of £127 million per annum. Indeed, those savings could be even greater if applied to all purchases made by all Fire Services. On a collective basis, the Fire and Rescue Services spend an estimated £600 million each year on buying equipment and fire engines.

Fire and Rescue Procurement Aggregation and Collaboration was funded by the Department for Communities and Local Government and jointly commissioned with the Chief Fire Officers Association through PA Consulting to identify how Fire and Rescue Services currently procure, where there are opportunities to buy more efficiently and highlight a range of strategic options on how these opportunities may be taken forward.

Penny Mordaunt MP:  Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Communities and Local Government

Penny Mordaunt MP: Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Communities and Local Government

Best value for taxpayers’ money

Speaking about the report, fire minister Penny Mordaunt MP said: “It cannot be right that the price of the same piece of kit or protective clothing varies so much for different Fire Services. This report clearly shows that the 46 Fire and Rescue Services must come together to maximise the buying power of the £600 million they spend and realise the best possible value for money for taxpayers.”

Mordaunt continued: “In the last decade, there has been a 46% reduction in call outs and incidents, while accidental deaths from fires in the home have reached an all-time low. However, expenditure and fire-fighter numbers have remained broadly the same. The case for change, then, is compelling. Taxpayers are right to expect the most cost-effective purchases so Fire and Rescue Authorities must seize this opportunity to make changes and drive better procurement.”

Fire and Rescue Procurement Aggregation and Collaboration recommends that Fire and Rescue Authorities seize the opportunity to deliver significant potential savings by:

*agreeing a common classification of goods and services for the 46 Fire and Rescue Authorities
*producing an index of prices paid on kit to avoid paying more for the same product
*securing internal sponsorship and partnership arrangements
*managing supplier relationships and contracts on a better basis
*developing a strategy for buying common non-fire goods and services together
*developing a national procurement pipeline plan that documents existing contract periods, future tendering exercises and large-scale procurement opportunities

The report determines it’s likely that standardisation of products will deliver even greater savings. Alongside greater volumes through collective procurement, this could add to the wider economies of scale. For example, if more Fire and Rescue Authorities bought the same vehicles then they would not only save on the vehicles themselves but also on the parts, maintenance and training.

Collaboration means the same procurement is not repeated time and time again in different services, in turn saving time as well as money. All of these findings make the case for collaborative procurement stronger than ever.

Sir Ken Knight

Sir Ken Knight

The Knight Review – Facing the Future

These findings follow last year’s report by former chief fire-fighter Sir Ken Knight which highlighted the scope for finding £200 million in savings while safeguarding emergency operations and protecting public safety.

The Knight Review revealed that huge variations exist between how the 46 different Fire and Rescue Authorities operate, with the cost per head of providing a service almost double in some areas to that of others.

Sir Ken identified that the 46 Fire and Rescue Authorities across England each had their own management structures, senior leaders and operational differences. Between 2008 and 2012, total reserves held by stand-alone Fire and Rescue Authorities increased from just over £200 million to more than £400 million. Ultimately, this highlights the potential for investing in spend-to-save type projects.

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CFOs question performance and benefits delivered by procurement teams

In a combined initiative designed to bring common value management visibility and practices to the procurement profession, three organisations – The Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply, A.T.Kearney and the Institute for Supply Management – have issued the results of the inaugural ROSMA Performance Check Report.

The Return on Supply Management Assets (ROSMA) Performance Check Report was developed to establish a uniform measurement of procurement’s value delivery to a given organisation. Entitled ‘Building the Brand of Procurement and Supply’, the report finds that leading procurement teams are indeed delivering significant value to their organisations.

However, without a credible standard allowing companies to consistently track and score procurement activities, many CFOs are now beginning to question the performance of – and the benefits delivered by – their procurement teams.

In what is an independent survey of CFOs and financial function leaders, the extensive study highlights that only 10% of procurement functions have established recognition with their CFOs regarding how procurement contributes value to the host business and that the benefits are both real and measurable.

The report is distilled from more than 400 completed, qualified and accepted cumulative benchmarks along with over 170 submissions focused on 2013 results.

Contributors participated in the benchmarking through ROSMA Performance Check gateways located within the CIPS and ISM websites as well as via A.T.Kearney’s 2014 study entitled: ‘Assessment of Excellence in Procurement’.

A.T.Kearney also contracted independent research to address the CFO community’s view of procurement.

The ROSMA Performance Check Report was developed to establish a uniform measurement of procurement’s value delivery to host organisations

The ROSMA Performance Check Report was developed to establish a uniform measurement of procurement’s value delivery to host organisations

Joe Raudabaugh, A.T.Kearney partner and co-author of the ROSMA Performance Check Report, stated: “There are many opportunities to change the brand of procurement across the profession and within our enterprises, and to attract, develop and sustain best athlete-calibre talent. Adopting value management practices is necessary for the future.”

David Noble, Group CEO at CIPS, noted: “There’s no doubt that the profession has to be seen as supporting the strategic aims of the enterprise and to have relevance to its goals and successes. We must be able to demonstrate value in a quantitative way.”

Focus on the main study findings

The inaugural ROSMA Performance Check report findings were developed through the survey responses of hundreds of companies. ROSMA is a revolutionary performance measurement standard that’s helping companies around the world to understand and measure how procurement contributes financially to the business.

Key findings of the new study are as follows:

• Top-quartile performers are reporting hard financial results in excess of seven times their costs and investment base in procurement, providing a strong basis for reinvestment and recognition. These leading procurement functions generate nearly £1 million in financial benefits per procurement employee each year

• Middle-tier performers are accretive, typically generating four-to-five times the investment and cost of their supply management assets, including people and technology, but they have not improved their productivity since tracking began in 2011. Bottom quartile teams are dilutive with financial benefits that do not cover the cost of and investment in their organisations

• Most organisations don’t have the reporting and tracking capabilities to provide ongoing and accurate visibility of procurement’s value-creating activities. They simply do not have a grasp of – and therefore cannot manage – their resources to optimise them with the same level of precision as is typically the case in other functions

• As noted earlier, the independent research that was conducted with CFOs as part of the overall study showed that only 10% of procurement functions have captured the respect, understanding and mindset of their financial colleagues regarding the value they contribute. Almost 15% are ‘out of mind’ or ‘inconsequential players’ to the CFO community while 75% have mixed and yet-to-be developed ‘brands’.

Tom Derry, CEO at the Institute for Supply Management, said: “With ROSMA Performance Check, we now know what world class performance looks like. Our challenge as a profession is to make sure that we are not a drag on performance, but rather a driver.”

To read the full ROSMA Performance Check Report visit: http://www.cips.org/rosma

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Procurement appears “more cost than risk-focused” states BSIA chairman

Speaking at the Trade Association’s Annual Luncheon on Tuesday at the Hilton Hotel, Park Lane, the BSIA’s chairman Geoff Zeidler highlighted the potential for a negative reputational impact on the security sector if procurement practices don’t start to change.

“Every year, procurement seems more cost rather than risk-focused,” said Zeidler in his welcome speech to a select gathering of security professionals, “but the erosion in authority of customers’ internal security management combined with this period of economic ‘austerity’ has ensured that this trend continues in many sectors. As a result, margins have been squeezed and forced cost reductions that may well have implications for quality. There’s the potential for a long-term reputational impact on the security industry that should concern us all.”

Zeidler continued this vitally important theme in his Chairman’s Address immediately after luncheon, setting the scene with a couple of ‘austerity’ situations that have made the national news headlines.

“When tendering for 111 services, the procurement process accepted a bid from NHS Direct at a price that proved undeliverable, and then blamed the supplier for bidding too low,” urged Zeidler. “And then when the food industry tried to drive prices too hard it ended up with horsemeat in value products. These cases ended up damaging all parties without it being clear who was to blame.”

BSIA chairman Geoff Zeidler addresses the audience at the Trade Association's Annual Luncheon 2013

BSIA chairman Geoff Zeidler addresses the audience at the Trade Association’s Annual Luncheon 2013

Last year, the latest Security Research Initiative (SRI) Survey conducted by Professor Martin Gill and his team highlighted the fact that the authority of customers’ security managers relative to the procurement process appears to be in decline.

“This year’s SRI survey investigates the impact of ‘bundling’ and implies that the way in which security’s procured is both varied and unclear,” commented Zeidler. “This means we have a less knowledgeable customer, a more confused procurement picture, a market where success means ‘nothing happens’ and an ‘austerity’ drive which wants to see more for less. This is a very dangerous mixture.”

What to do when asked to deliver ‘more for less’

What should security companies do when asked to deliver more for less by the customer, then?

“The answer is not to blame procurement,” urged the BSIA’s chairman. “Although they push hard, they do need to know their suppliers are profitable, and sustainably so.”

Zeidler feels that if the security sector is to preserve quality delivery and its reputation, the only safe road ahead is to do things differently.

“As a regulated service where people and technology are working together to manage risk,” he said, “security is a separate service and ought to be procured as such. Customers must design their budgets and procurement strategies in such a way that they allow the supplier groups to provide all the tools necessary for managing risk as the best route towards reducing costs rather than trying to commoditise the elements. Many of the BSIA’s member companies have been trying to convince the market of this philosophy for some time now. I hope the Trade Association can promote Case Studies along these lines that ensure more customers listen.”

Suppliers faced by a commoditised tender

Zeidler also believes that suppliers absolutely need to be clear about what represents sustainable profitability, the changes that they’ll have to make to deliver on lower cost, what operational and reputational risks this may create and – as BSIA members – ensure that they don’t create a situation wherein they have to reduce the quality of their staff or management focus to the point at which they’re forced to ‘deliver horsemeat’ or declare that the tender was, in fact, unsustainable.

“In the private security sector you only know the quality of the service when it’s tested,” suggested Zeidler, “and failures hit reputations. In the face of ‘austerity’ we’re pressed to reduce cost without always detailing the ‘how’. The legacy of these decisions may not be seen tomorrow, but rather over the next three years. If we – as BSIA members who are the benchmark for quality in the industry – do not resist competition based on a reduction in the quality of staff and management then we will never build the reputation and trust we need to grow our industry. We must be proud of what we do and not undervalue it.”

From conversations that Zeidler has had with BSIA members across both the manpower and systems worlds, it’s clear to him that everyone needs to improve on their abilities to express the true costs and value of good security to procurement teams – and make sure that Procurement Departments understand what sustainable profitability looks like.

“This is where individual BSIA members talking to their customers can play their part. We must all be honest.”

Zeidler’s hope is that, by next year, the industry will be celebrating an environment where sustainable profitability is better understood, competition is more focused on innovation and the long-term reputation and trust of the security sector has been preserved to allow further partnership working with the police as well as other public service bodies.

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