Tag Archives: NHS

Chubb wins fire extinguisher maintenance contract for Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust

Chubb Fire & Security has secured a new contract to provide fire extinguisher maintenance services at more than 50 sites belonging to or managed by the Derbyshire Community Health Services (DCHS) NHS Foundation Trust.

Hospitals, private general practitioner offices, health centres and dental surgeries are all included in the three-year contract.

As part of the agreement, Chubb will ensure that more than 1,500 fire extinguishers and fire blankets are regularly serviced and maintained to British Standards in order to protect patients, employees and assets.

chubbfireextinguisher

“We’ve worked with Chubb previously and it’s good to be working with the company again,” said Emma Morten, procurement officer at DCHS. “The sales team and engineers are superb. There has been a seamless process from signing the contract to mobilisation.”

On being awarded the contract, Chubb serviced all of the fire extinguishers at each site.

“The contract is flexible and we’re continually adding sites at very short notice,” continued Morten. “This is a great advantage to us.”

DCHS provides care for more than 4,000 patients every day in 13 community hospitals and 28 health centres. It’s one of the largest providers of specialist community health services in the country, serving a patient population of more than one million.

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Samsung Techwin WiseNetIII cameras help create safe environment for Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust estate

Creating a safe environment for patients, staff and visitors is a constant challenge throughout the National Health Service (NHS) and particularly so within mental health facilities. With that in mind, 19 Mental Health Units located throughout the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust’s estate have been equipped with IP network-based video monitoring systems.

The safety of its staff, patients and visitors is fundamentally important to the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, which currently provides care for over 40,000 people across the Norfolk and Suffolk region who have mental health problems and offers a range of specialist services dedicated to the care and recovery of anyone experiencing mental ill-health or suffering from substance misuse issues.

Although some of the Mental Health Units are secure, the majority allow the free movement of patients. On that basis, the Trust’s management team has looked to source the latest advances in video monitoring technology to alert nursing and support staff such that they can react quickly and appropriately to any situation where there may be a problem.

“We’re fully committed to the ‘Safewards’ initiative, a key aim of which is to reduce the rates of conflict within in-patient mental health settings,” said Mark Milliard, capital projects manager at the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust. “We believe that the use of smart technology, such as IP network-based video monitoring systems, can play a large role in helping us achieve this objective.”

Migrating from analogue to Video-over-IP

Over recent years, Milliard – who has worked within NHS Estates since 1986 – has overseen migration of the Trust’s analogue CCTV systems to Video-over-IP solutions.

“The analogue systems that were installed a number of years ago became increasingly unreliable and we made the decision to upgrade them with IP network-based systems,” explained Milliard. “A key advantage of being able to transmit images over the network is that it provides the flexibility for any authorised end user to view live or recorded video captured by any of the cameras from their PCs. We realised that this would provide us with much more flexibility in terms of how we monitor activity at the mental health units when compared to the analogue CCTV systems which could only transmit captured images to a central location.”

In compliance with the Trust’s obligation to achieve best value from its investment in new technology, Milliard initiated a tender process and invited a number of installation companies to submit proposals to install and service video monitoring systems at each of the 19 locations. The tender document specified which cameras should be installed.

“It made sense to source the cameras from just one manufacturer and, from an ongoing maintenance point of view, to deploy the minimum possible number of different camera models,” added Milliard. “I decided to carry out my own research as to which manufacturer had a product portfolio which could best cover all our requirements, as well as offering us the value we were looking for. Part of the value formulae had to include a rock solid reputation for reliability, as well as cameras with advanced technical features which would allow us to capture and monitor high definition images regardless of the location or environmental conditions.”

Image quality and camera configuration

Milliard’s extensive evaluation of a large number of manufacturers resulted in a shortlist of two, from which Samsung Techwin emerged as the winner.

“Both shortlisted companies were able to show evidence as to the reliability of their cameras,” explained Milliard. “However, I was particularly impressed with the quality of the images which could be captured by the Samsung Techwin cameras and the fact that each camera, depending on its location, could be configured to multi-stream images at different frame rates and at different resolutions. This offers a significant benefit from a network bandwidth management point of view.”

Milliard established that only three Samsung Techwin cameras would need to be specified to provide coverage of areas both inside and outside all 19 mental health units. All three models are part of the Samsung Techwin WiseNetIII camera range and include the SNV-6084R vandal-resistant 2 Megapixel Full HD network dome camera, which has built-in IR LEDs to enable images of any activity to be captured regardless of the lighting conditions.

Milliard also selected the SNO-6084R weather-resistant bullet cameras equipped with a motorised varifocal lens and built-in IR (infrared) illuminators.

The third model to be specified was the SNV-6012 2 Megapixel Full HD vandal-resistant flat dome camera.

Installation in phases

The installation of IP network-based video surveillance systems at the 19 mental health units has been carried out in phases and, following the completion of a tender process, the contract for phase three of the project was awarded to Ipswich-based ACW Electrical Suffolk.

“We were obviously delighted to have been entrusted to fulfil such an important contract,” said Tony Wheatley, a director of the company. “We sourced the Samsung Techwin products from Blue Helix, who are a leading specialist distributor of IP network solutions. We worked closely together with the Blue Helix technical team to ensure we could complete the project to the satisfaction of Mark Milliard and his colleagues.”

Wheatley added: “As this was the first time we had installed Samsung Techwin cameras, we arranged for our engineers to attend a Samsung Techwin training course so that they would be able to configure each camera for optimum performance. The good news is that the cameras were extremely easy to install, which added to our ability to complete the contract without any delays or issues.”

Local control for the NVRs

Images from all of the cameras are recorded by Samsung Techwin SRN-1670D NVRs. These have been designed to have the look and familiarity of a DVR while delivering all the benefits of a network video recorder.

Unlike most NVRs, which can only be programmed remotely, the SRN-1670D may be locally controlled with the help of a mouse and a very easy to use on-screen display.

The SRN-1670D has the capacity for five SATA HDDs, offering the potential for a massive 10 Tb of on-board storage. It can record audio across all channels and has a built-in DVD writer and USB ports for easy export of video evidence.

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UNION tackles unauthorised key duplication in healthcare facilities thanks to keyULTRA solution

UNION – part of ASSA Abloy Security Solutions (a division of ASSA Abloy UK) – is tackling unauthorised key duplication in healthcare facilities with its keyULTRA master key system. 

Last year alone, NHS departments reported 498 data breaches to the Information Commissioner’s Office, in turn showing how data protection has become an increasing concern within hospitals.

Facilities and security managers in healthcare establishments need to safeguard confidential information and expensive medical equipment. On that basis, managing security and access control requirements are critical.

The keyULTRA master key cylinders possess one of the longest patents in the market, expiring in 2028. DuraPIN technology protects both the key and cylinder assembly from illegal duplication and permits access to authorised personnel only.

This system has successfully been installed in a number of healthcare facilities including Arnold Lodge, a medium secure psychiatric unit in Leicester, and Good Hope Hospital in Birmingham.

Craig Birch, category manager for cylinders at ASSA Abloy UK, said: “Unauthorised copies of keys and an unknown number of keys distributed to people, both within and outside organisations, are common problems for hospitals with large numbers of personnel and a high staff turnover. A copied or a lost key is an immediate security threat that could lead to data breaches and costly civil monetary penalties. Investing in keyULTRA is an effective way of ensuring that no unauthorised keys are cut, meaning that facilities and security managers are fully aware of everyone with access to each area of the building. That helps to eliminate the costly problems that could occur from compromised security.”

keyULTRA boasts enhanced features including the highest key-related security, as per BS EN 1303:2005, along with resistance to bumping, drilling, picking and plug extraction. The solution is also approved for use on FD30 and FD60 fire doors in accordance with BS EN 1634-1.

Featuring self-lubricating materials designed to enhance its resistance to wear and tear, UNION’s keyULTRA is ideal for busy environments and can also help to reduce maintenance costs.

The product has been successfully tested to over half a million cycles to guarantee performance. It employs a strong and durable key, with an easy-to-grip, oversized key bow to facilitate product use.

*For further information on keyULTRA visit: http://www.unionkeyultra.co.uk/

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Institute of Risk Management experts outline key risk areas for 2015

Political instability caused by low oil prices, increased shareholder activism and the business threat posed by a potential UK exit from the EU are among the chief concerns voiced by some of the UK’s leading risk experts for 2015.

As 2014 draws to a close, members of the Institute of Risk Management (IRM) were asked to identify key risk areas for 2015. A broad range of oil and gas, political, healthcare, regulatory and insurance risks were highlighted as potential flashpoints.

Oil and Gas

“The lower oil price will raise a number of risks, including political and social disruption in oil producing countries which, if not successfully managed, will impact on the world,” asserted Mark Boult, Fellow of the IRM and director at risk management consultancy DNV GL.

Boult continued: “Given the greater financial pressure we will see on the sector next year, stakeholders need to maintain their focus on the integrity of assets. Not doing so will deliver poorer reliability and increase the risks of a major accident. Industry and Governments should work together to proactively manage down the commercial pressures and risks facing the industry from the oil price drop.”

A catastrophic major accident and physical asset integrity will remain a major industry focus for next year. “Such events are always – and always need to be – at the front of our minds given the impact they have on people, the environment and the business of the industry as a whole,” explained Boult.

Commentators from the IRM have mapped out key potential risks for 2015

Commentators from the IRM have mapped out key potential risks for 2015

Politics

An uncertain political environment in the UK is highlighted as a key risk area for next year by IRM members. “We need to watch closely how the dialogue between the UK and EU develops,” said José Morago, IRM chairman and group risk director at Aviva. “The potential risk of a UK exit from the EU could bring about even bigger strategic, operational and legal risk challenges to many international companies than those raised by Scottish independence.”

Morago added: “Next year, we have the UK General Election and possible presidential elections in Europe. With continuing fiscal deficits, cost of living pressures, low investment returns and low public trust in financial institutions, there’s a real risk of further – and bolder – political announcements as parties compete for public approval.”

Mark Butterworth, member of the IRM and managing director at risk management consultancy Condie Risk, believes the unpredictability of next year’s UK General Election is unique in his adult memory. Butterworth argues that a vote to leave the EU could provide the Scottish National Party with a boost, “possibly leading to the start of the ‘second’ wave for independence.”

Alternatively, an indecisive result in a May election which fails to resolve ‘the European question’ could lead to “upheaval, forcing a second General Election in late 2015, with all the attendant uncertainty that entails.”

Healthcare

The total number of Ebola deaths is predicted to peak in 2015 according to Patrick Keady FIRM, risk leadership consultant with the NHS. “This will be achieved by continuing with current levels of awareness, actions and plans and by Governments avoiding ineffective knee-jerk reactions. Lessons will be learned from Sierra Leone’s handling of the crisis where 21% of people infected died compared to 60% in Guinea and 42% in Liberia.”

Further 2015 predictions by Keady are as follows:
• “It will be the year more people will say ‘No’ to so-called ‘healthy food’, leading to reduced demand for healthcare in the long term. People can consume up to seven times the World Health Organisation’s daily recommended amount of sugar when their diet is limited to foods such as low fat yoghurts, muesli bars and sports drinks. The debate about processed versus natural food will escalate with the launch of ‘That Sugar Film’ next year.”
• “Drugs and alcohol will both start to be seen as healthcare issues. With 9% of all emergency hospital care being for people with a drug or alcohol problem, 36% of these are from the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods. An increased focus on the health implications of drugs and alcohol will start to benefit the population and, in turn, reduce drug and alcohol-related crime statistics.”

Regulation

According to IRM commentators, new regulation is going to pose risks for companies and company directors in 2015.

Taken together, the 2014 UK Corporate Governance Code and Financial Reporting Council’s Guidance on Risk Management will significantly upgrade the weaponry of shareholder activism in 2015. “Greater corporate governance and risk management education at Board level – including Company Secretaries – will be needed to mitigate against the risk posed by the new regulatory environment,” stated Mark Butterworth.

The Financial Conduct Authority’s drive for greater competence and capability means that Boards of Directors must be far more proactive about ensuring their capabilities match their needs. José Morago commented: “Boards need to identify governance gaps and plug them fast, whether that’s through acquiring new skills, qualifications or experience. What’s expected from Boards is going to be raised quite fast next year.”

Insurance

Reduced profitability for the UK insurance sector is an identifiable risk for 2015 according to Enrico Bertagna, IRM affiliate and senior vice-president of business development at Allied World Europe Insurance.

“If there’s no material change in claims trends or major catastrophes,” outlined Bertagna, “we’re looking at ongoing downward pressure on premium rates, reducing underwriting profits in most classes of business.”

Bertagna also believes we’re likely to see a trend towards the localisation of risk in 2015. “We’ll see less premium flowing to London from emerging markets. That will lead to reduced premium to London market insurers on the one hand, while potentially exposing local market insurers to greater volatility on the other.”

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Unisys Security Index Survey: ‘Britons place greater trust in banks to protect personal data than they do the NHS or central Government’

The latest Unisys survey shows a nation divided on the question of personal data protection ahead of NHS’ Care.data launch. The survey reveals lower levels of trust in many private sector organisations and that financial institutions are most trusted with personal data by members of the UK public. 15% of UK respondents to the survey do not trust any organisation with their personal information.

UK citizens place greater trust in banks and financial institutions to protect their personal data than they do the National Health Service (NHS) and central Government. This is a key finding of the annual global Unisys Security Index survey, the results of which are announced today.

The findings may raise concerns for the UK Government ahead of the launch this Autumn of Care.data, the NHS’ national health database.

The most recent Unisys Security Index asked UK respondents to select three types of organisation they most trust with their personal data from a list including financial institutions, the NHS, employers, central Government, private companies and service providers.

The largest percentage (53%) of respondents selected financial institutions. The NHS was the second most trusted of the organisations listed, and cited by 50% of respondents.

Among the lesser trusted organisations cited by the UK respondents are employers (44%), central Government (31%) and private companies (23%). Service organisations such as broadband, TV or telephone providers are seen as trustworthy by only 16% of those surveyed.

A significant 15% of the population said they do not trust any of the listed organisations with their data.

The UK Government has much work to do in reassuring the public of its data security measures before the delayed roll-out of the Care.data NHS database this autumn

The UK Government has much work to do in reassuring the public of its data security measures before the delayed roll-out of the Care.data NHS database this autumn

In addition, the Index revealed varying levels of trust in the NHS from different generations, with only 44% of UK respondents over 50 reporting that they trust the NHS with their personal data, in contrast to 555 of 18-49 year olds.

The proposed roll-out of Care.data, designed to hold NHS patients’ digital medical records for the care and health services, was delayed earlier this year due to public confusion over the initiative.

Work to be done on reassurance

Dr Gerhard Knecht, head of global security services and compliance at Unisys Enterprise Services, commented: “The NHS has work to do in reassuring a large part of the population that it can safely handle their personal data. We believe the Government must focus on educating the public on how their data will be treated and what security measures will be taken before its second attempt to launch the programme.”

Only 27.7& of UK respondents over the age of 65 listed central Government as one of their most trusted organisations compared to 39% of 25-34 year olds.

Dr Knecht added: “Despite widespread acknowledgement that the current Government has favoured older generations with its policies, the coalition clearly has more work to do in convincing old people of the benefits of its Digital Strategy, which was introduced well over two years ago in the 2012 budget.”

Sceptical North versus Trusting South

The research also reveals how Northerners are less trusting than Southerners when it comes to personal data, with 7% more respondents from the North claiming they don’t trust any of the organisations listed in the survey.

This divide is particularly apparent in their respective views on private companies, with just 20% of Northerners placing trust in them compared to 29% of Southerners.

Concerns over identity and financial protection

The Unisys Security Index results also show Brits are more worried about personal security than financial, Internet or national security threats.

More than half of respondents harbour concerns over identity theft and misuse of personal information. Financial security is the second greatest area of concern, with just under half (48%) of those surveyed expressing serious concern about other people obtaining and using their credit or debit card details.

The overall Unisys Security Index for Britain has dropped considerably from 2013, with a significant drop in the National Security Index score contributing the most to this decline. The National security index score for the UK has dropped 48 points, in fact, from 130 in 2013 to just 82 in 2014.

Despite 2013 being widely acknowledged as a bumper year for data breaches, less than a third (30%) of Brits surveyed are seriously concerned about computer security in relation to viruses or spam.

About the Unisys Security Index

Lieberman Research Group conducted the survey in Latin America, Europe, Malaysia and the USA. Newspoll conducted the research in Australia and New Zealand.

The Unisys Security Index surveys nearly 11,000 people in 12 countries: Australia, Brazil, Colombia, France, Germany, Malaysia, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States.

For more information visit: http://www.unisyssecurityindex.com

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