Tag Archives: NFC

Key industry players join forces to establish FiRa Consortium focused on Ultra-Wideband technology

Recognising the need for emerging applications to build on a strong foundation that supports interoperability among all categories of devices, sponsor members prominent in the spheres of access, secure connectivity and mobile/CE device solutions – namely the ASSA ABLOY Group (which includes HID Global and NXP Semiconductors), Samsung Electronics and Bosch –  have announced the launch of the FiRa Consortium.

The new coalition is designed to grow the Ultra-Wideband (UWB) ecosystem such that new use cases for fine ranging capabilities can thrive, ultimately setting a new standard in seamless user experiences. Sony Imaging Products & Solutions, LitePoint and the Telecommunications Technology Association are the first companies to join the newly-formed organisation.

The FiRa name, which stands for ‘Fine Ranging’, highlights UWB technology’s ability to deliver “unprecedented accuracy” when measuring the distance or determining the relative position of a target. Notably so in challenging environments, UWB technology outperforms other technologies in terms of accuracy, power consumption, robustness in RF connection and security “by a wide margin”

FiRaConsortiumLogo.

Charlie Zhang, chair of the FiRa Consortium and vice-president of engineering at Samsung Electronics, stated: “As an industry consortium, we believe UWB technology can transform the way in which people experience connectivity. We’re very much committed to the widespread adoption of interoperable UWB technologies.”

IEEE Standard 802.15.4/4z in focus 

The starting point for UWB technology is the IEEE Standard 802.15.4/4z, which defines the essential characteristics for low data rate wireless connectivity and enhanced ranging. It’s the aim of the FiRa Consortium to build on what the IEEE has already established by developing an interoperability standard based on the IEEE’s profiled features, defining mechanisms that are out of scope of the IEEE standard and also pursuing activities that support rapid development of specific use cases. 

The capabilities of UWB promise to make it an essential technology in many areas, among them:

*Seamless access control UWB can identify an individual’s approach towards or away from a secured entrance, verify security credentials and let an authorised individual pass through an entrance without physically presenting the credential

*Location-based services UWB offers highly precise positioning, even in congested multi-path signal environments, thereby making it easier to navigate large venues such as airports and Shopping Centres or find a car in a multi-story parking garage. It also enables targeted digital marketing campaigns and foot traffic data. Retailers can present customised offers, Government agencies can tailor their notifications and entertainment venues can personalise recommendations during events

*Device-to-Device (Peer-to-Peer) services By providing precise relative distance and direction between two devices, UWB lets devices find the relative location of each other even without infrastructures such as anchors or access points. This allows people to easily find one another in crowded spaces or find items even when they’ve been placed in hidden areas

Use with other wireless technologies

Due to its low power spectral density, UWB offers little-to-no interference with other wireless standards, so it’s well suited for use with other wireless technologies including Near Field Communication (NFC), Bluetooth and Wi-Fi.

There are also adjacent markets that leverage UWB in other ways, especially automotive. “The FiRa Consortium’s commitment to a complete ecosystem means we will work with other consortia and industry players to develop approaches and define parameters,” explained Charles Dachs, vice-chair of the FiRa Consortium and general manager at NXP Semiconductors.

FiRa Consortium members will have the chance to influence industry trends, gain early access to technical details, certify interoperable products, expand the UWB ecosystem and share expertise. Ramesh Songukrishnasamy, director and treasurer of the FiRa Consortium and CTO of HID Global, commented: “We encourage anyone from any relevant industry area who has a vested interest in the success of UWB to join us and contribute to the Consortium’s work.”

*To learn more about the FiRa Consortium and the benefits of membership visit www.firaconsortium.org

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Norbain announces arrival of latest Seos Profile range from HID

Norbain has announced the launch of HID’s latest Seos technology, which now includes the ability to use mobile devices for secure access and efficiently manage multiple applications.

The new range consists of the following components:

HID Seos Profile Readers

The latest readers in the SE Portfolio. The readers use the Seos platform which offers the simplest configuration and Best in Class security and privacy protection. Additionally, the readers are available to be used with HID Mobile Access.

NorbainHIDiClass

HID Mobile Access

Allows the user to download an app to their smart phone and take advantage of either NFC or Bluetooth to communicate with the reader and allow entry. The system is seamless to set up and install, offering the next generation in access control. The app can be downloaded via the Apple app store or Google Play (Android).

iClass Seos Cards

Based on the latest technology from HID Global, Seos cards work seamlessly out of the box with Seos Profile readers and offer Best in Class security and privacy. The cards represent the perfect solution for environments where multiple legacy reader technologies are in place and the move to advanced, more secure technology is desired.

Anne Wesley, product marketing manager for access control at Norbain, commented: “Products in HID’s new Seos range of readers and cards allow end users to advance to the more secure technology now being offered. With products that can seamlessly integrate into legacy systems, this allows end user customers to not only manage the move into more advanced security, but also upgrade security at a pace that’s suitable for their budget.”

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TDSi reports 25% increase in export market visitors to its stand at IFSEC International 2015

Reporting a 25% increase in export market visitors to its stand at IFSEC International 2015, integrated security solutions developer TDSi believes this reflects the continued and rapid expansion of the global security market. Interest at the show also indicated a continued customer demand for fully-integrated solutions rather than just security components.

Post-event, TDSi’s managing director John Davies told Risk: “IFSEC International is a great barometer of the state of the security sector. It was obvious from this year’s event that the market has become truly globalised, with a sizeable increase in visitors travelling from other regions to see the latest and best solutions that the security sector has to offer.”

Davies continued: “I’m also pleased to say that the feedback we had from visitors is that our own approach to fully-integrated security systems is essential in the post-recession market. Rather than just purchasing security products, the evolving security consumer wants intelligent, flexible and comprehensively integrated systems. These are exactly what TDSi offers and continues to research and develop.”

The international nature of the event also confirmed assumptions on the geographical markets’ strengths and weaknesses. “In comparison to China, South East Asia and the Middle East,” urged Davies, “the European market has somewhat plateaued, partially due to a degree of uncertainty still looming over the Euro Zone. In the UK, TDSi is benefiting from a healthy upturn in the market and we anticipate a very healthy growth figure of 10+% this year. This may be partially due to having a new majority UK Government and thus a stable business environment for the next five years, in contrast to the situation that’s pertaining in Europe.”

TDSi's stand at IFSEC International 2015

TDSi’s stand at IFSEC International 2015

Security, IT and building control systems

Davies also explained to Risk UK that the demand for security systems designed to work with IT and buildings control systems is rapidly becoming truly global in nature.

“Security operators and consumers have become very well versed in what’s possible,” he said, “largely because of the rise in trends such as the Internet of Things. They now demand this flexibility from all of their technology purchases. These are exciting times with real optimism and increased funding. For their part, providers need to stay on top of demand and offer the very best solutions in what continues to be a highly competitive and ‘savvy’ buyers market.”

There was also a noticeable increase in the volume of new visitors at IFSEC International, as TDSi’s product and marketing manager Sarah Phillips observed during the show (which ran from 16-18 June at London’s ExCeL).

“IFSEC International has always been an excellent opportunity for security solutions providers, installers, integrators, consultants and end users to make contact,” stated Phillips. “That was very apparent this year. IFSEC remains an ideal platform to reacquaint with both existing partners and customers.”

Phillips added: “Many end users approached our team for advice. Naturally, we’re very keen to preserve the channel structure of our business so we do actively refer customers to our partners, but equally this gives us a greater insight into the needs of security operators. This kind of detail is invaluable for our business and product development streams.”

One of the main themes on TDSi’s stand at IFSEC International 2015 was a demonstration of the considerable benefits of using the company’s solutions in conjunction with those produced by other specialist manufacturers, among them Texecom, Milestone Systems, ASSA Abloy and SimonsVoss.

Sarah Phillips (centre) with Team TDSi at London's ExCeL

Sarah Phillips (centre) with Team TDSi at London’s ExCeL

This year, visitors took particular interest in TDSi’s new range of readers (including MIFARE Plus, DESFire and NFC technologies for added security and flexibility) as well as the enhanced web access portal for EXgarde.

In conclusion, Phillips explained: “Visitors are always excited to see brand new products and the readers are one of the staple lines in our product portfolio. IFSEC International is one of the highlights of our year and, with our continued success at the show, that situation will remain so for many years to come.”

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Apple NFC could be “lightning rod” for change in access control sector

In the latest Research Note issued by IHS, Blake Kozak – the company’s senior analyst in the sphere of security and building technologies – discusses how the new NFC and Apply Pay features of the iPhone 6 could be the “lightning rod” to finally spark changes in the way that mobile credentials are used for access control.

For more than four years now, one of the most talked about trends has been Near Field Communication (NFC). NFC was supposed to change the face of the access control world by eliminating the need for cards, subsequently reducing the administrative burden on organisations of all sizes while at the same time increasing security.

However, this scenario has not yet come to pass, with suppliers to date offering little more than pilot projects and limited real world installations.

Of course, NFC isn’t a new concept. In 2006, Nokia released the first NFC phone. Four years later, Samsung issued the first Android NFC phone before announcing its inaugural Secu-NFC technology a year later. According to Samsung, the Secu-NFC chip combines an NFC controller and a secure element storing personal information and security keys with advanced encryption technologies.

Then, last year, Samsung and Visa announced a major partnership for mobile payments.

Today, the list of NFC-enabled phones is extensive. Examples include Alcatel, Asus, BlackBerry, Nexus, HTC, Kyocera and LG (among many others).

The iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus

The iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus

Barriers to NFC’s implementation in access control

Historically, most NFC installations were instigated by partnerships between handset manufacturers and financial institutions, in turn producing closed systems with limited opportunity for developers to expand the concept to uses beyond mobile payment.

IHS believes this has been one of the main barriers to the implementation of NFC in the access control sector.

On Tuesday of this week, Apple announced that NFC would be a feature of the new iPhone 6. While Apple Pay is primarily a mechanism for secure mobile payments, there appears to be plenty of opportunity for other applications since iOS 8 will also have an Apple Pay application programming interface (API) available for developers.

Already, many retailers and restaurants have implemented Apple Pay within their own applications, allowing patrons to skip lines and pay/order directly from a mobile device. According to Apple, the mobile payment transaction occurs by assigning a unique device account number which is encrypted and securely stored in the secure element (a dedicated chip inside the iPhone). When a purchase is made, the device account number alongside a transaction-specific dynamic security code is used to process the payment. On that basis, the actual credit or debit card numbers are never shared with merchants or transmitted with payment.

The true benefit of this announcement for the access control sector is the potential use of the open API for developers. Although Samsung Galaxy has an embedded SE and countless other devices offer subscriber identification module (SIM)-based SE, there has been limited traction for access control.

There are many forms of secure element, including the universal integrated circuit card (UICC), NFC SIM, embedded SE, external (sticker or sleeve) and microSD. The most used formats are UICC and embedded, with the new iPhone 6 featuring an embedded SE.

According to the 2014 IHS report on NFC, 18.2% of cellular handsets shipped in 2013 were NFC-enabled (up from about 8% in 2012). IHS forecasts the number of phones that are NFC-enabled to reach about 1.17 billion by 2018.

The report also estimates that, in 2013, around 70% of NFC secure element implementations within cellular handsets were embedded while 27% resided on the SIM card.

What does this mean for the access control sector?

Apple’s announcement addresses one of the barriers the access control sector has faced with regards to NFC (ie loading an identifier onto the secure element). With the API mentioned by Apple, it’s possible that access control manufacturers – among others in the supply chain – could load and command an identifier directly onto the secure element. Currently, most providers of NFC-based access control are using encryption methods located in the sandbox (host operating system) of the handset only rather than the SE.

By using host card emulation (HCE), providers are able to offer NFC outside of the SE. Although this isn’t deemed a Best Practice method, the only other means to provide mobile access control through NFC would be to partner with all the cellular carriers and providers which can be an incredibly arduous process. By partnering, the access supplier is allowed access to the SE, which is typically either embedded or in the SIM card.

One example of such a partnership is HID and Oberthur Technologies. In 2013, HID announced a partnership with Oberthur Technologies to carry Seos digital keys on NFC SIM cards.

As mentioned above, the Apple announcement could make it easier for access control suppliers to provide mobile credentials with the true security afforded by the secure element.

Beyond the buzz, the market opportunity for access control remains unclear. Only time will tell if Apple providing mobile payment will ‘jump start’ NFC usage for access control. Some access control manufacturers speculate that the use of the secure element may not always be necessary and that the encryption provided for access control data on the handset is sufficient for most end users.

Impact on the access control sector

How quickly could this announcement impact access control? Today, data suggests that less than 3% of retailers (or 220,000 out of about nine million) will be using the mobile payments at the start. One of the main reasons for low adoption is the lack of infrastructure in stores.

However, every credit card in the US, for example, will be required to have EMV Chip and PIN technology by October 2015. As a result, merchants could decide to move forward with NFC capabilities since they will need to upgrade their system in any case.

Interestingly enough, Apple is initially only launching in the US which has the lowest penetration rate of mobile payments compared with all other regions. There is a tremendous upside though. Access control end users already have the infrastructure in place to support NFC (eg the smart card reader, 13.56 MHz). While some pieces of the system (such as incompatible hardware and software) may need upgrading, the system is mostly ready.

The iPhone 6 is larger than the iPhone 5S

The iPhone 6 is larger than the iPhone 5S

Unlike the retail space, which has to replace millions of terminals and retrain employees, access control is already primed for the transition.

Overall, Apple could instigate change for the access control sector. However, adoption will remain low due to the other barriers which have not been addressed, such as mobile phone issuance to colleagues and identifying which department in an organisation will manage the mobile credentials. In most cases, the phone would be managed by IT and the security credential would be managed by the Security Department.

New policies and procedures will have to be created and many end users will still be issued with badges for identification purposes.

Bluetooth: a viable alternative to NFC

Bluetooth is becoming a viable alternative to NFC. Security suppliers have been working for the past several years to partner with NFC and implement it beyond pilot projects but to little avail.

As a result, many are turning to Bluetooth, which is deemed by many to be a more robust option for security purposes such as access control since, for instance, the read range can be modified.

Additionally, Bluetooth has a longer history with smart phones than NFC. Bluetooth was introduced in 2000 and NFC in 2006.

While the Apple announcement sets the ball rolling for NFC in the physical security space by providing more outlets for app developers to create a unique user experience, other barriers still need to be overcome before a state of critical mass is attained.

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IHS Research Note: ‘The Access Control Industry of Tomorrow’ – How will role-based access and open standards influence market opportunity?

In the latest Research Note from IHS, Blake Kozak (senior analyst for security and building technologies) discusses the exciting changes afoot within the access control industry.

The access control market is beginning to propel itself into innovation and technological advancement through integration. Open standards, convergence of access control and video and partnerships with non-security related companies [and non-access control companies such video surveillance providers] are the focus of the industry.

It’s safe to say that access control providers, integrators and building IT managers are no longer hesitant to implement access control to its fullest capacity. Integrating access control with video allows for forensics and more seamless security.

While video recording at the door is not an entirely new concept, many providers are looking to develop software and user interfaces which unify the two solutions. Additionally, ease of use and convenience are helping to drive the industry.

The Access Control Industry of Tomorrow: how will role-based access and open standards influence market opportunity?

The Access Control Industry of Tomorrow: how will role-based access and open standards influence market opportunity?

Access control does not always need to be used for only hardened security applications. Using social media and applications/hardware in conjunction with access control could help open the market to new opportunities since interacting with the access control devices is becoming increasingly popular.

NFC (Near Field Communication) and BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy) are also trending and will allow more options in the medium term for those end users who wish to replace physical credentials with mobile credentials.

Open standards/interoperability standards

Additionally, open standards and interoperability standards may also begin to change the face of the industry over the next 12-36 months. ONVIF Profile C and Physical-Logical Access Interoperability (PLAI) may look to lead this movement.

In addition to open standards, integration with hardware and software that’s neither security related nor BMS related could also change the industry.

Role-based access control is one example. Typically, access control rights today are assigned based on time schedules which often requires additional inputs from an administrator. However, there could be a trend towards using assigned roles to provide access to not only doors but to also logical access control.

The future focus could be on allowing logical domains to work with physical domains in order to increase efficiency and open doors for other possibilities in addition to automated privilege management.

Last, travel programs within organisations could be tied to access control systems which automate access to different buildings within an organisation based on a colleague booking travel. This would effectively eliminate the need for an administrator to grant each travelling colleague access rights to each building they are traveling to in a different city or country.

Innovation and implementation very much part of the mix

Overall, the access control industry is no longer standing still with innovation and implementation of technology firmly part of the mix. The access industry is now thoroughly entrenched in wireless, IP-enabled devices and integration beyond video surveillance. Many of the leading suppliers of access control are working to offer a wide range of product and offerings which include not only enterprise but also SMB.

One of the keys to success over the next few years will be to have an offering beyond traditional access control readers, panels, cards and software and embrace the new position of the industry which includes things such as remote management, mobile and fixed functionality credentials, wireless, reducing administrative burden and increased efficiency and integration with human capital management software.

The access control industry of tomorrow is knocking at the door.

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Security and access control: the key trends for 2014

John Davies (managing director) and Mike Sussman (engineering and operations director) of TDSi forecast that access control will exhibit much innovation in 2014 by embracing new technology.

Last year saw a big rise in integrated systems across the security sector, and 2014 looks set to follow this pattern with a number of technologies and trends coming to the fore.

With the integration of different security, IT and building services coming together, 2014 looks set to be a year of evolution rather than revolution. From a business point of view, this places the industry in a strong position to maintain growth.

Near Field Communications (NFC)

A technology that has been promising to do big things for some time is Near Field Communications (NFC). While the technology for it has been available for some time, NFC’s success will be determined by the tipping point from the number of enabled mobile devices and the public’s willingness to use them to gain secure access to secure doorways.

However, the use of NFC has also been spurred on by a number of new compatible stand-alone locks particularly well suited to access control using a smart device.

At the moment NFC is more popular in the consumer market. For example, landlords can send a key to the smart phone of a tenant which can then be activated or revoked as necessary (without the inconveniences of having to immediately issue traditional metal keys).

John Davies: md at TDSi

John Davies: md at TDSi

History has shown us that public acceptance of a technology will push its adoption in the commercial market too, as experience of the technology and trust in its ability is cemented.

NFC offers exciting possibilities for securing access and the signs are that the market is poised to increase adoption very soon.

Cloud-based security

The adoption of cloud-based security is another area that has gained enormous ground in recent years, and looks set to continue vehemently in 2014.

It’s fair to say there were concerns over the security of using the cloud voiced by some commentators and potential users when cloud-based access control was first muted. However, these concerns were largely quashed by a wider acceptance of online use of services such as banking or retail which have demonstrated that using IP needn’t compromise vital security.

As well as ease of use and installation, cloud-based services also rapidly roll out updates (which is particularly useful in an emergency situation) and there is no need to store large servers onsite (which could be attacked or hacked directly), in turn freeing space and resources.

Security integration

The momentum of security integration is unlikely to slow in 2014. In fact, it will continue to be a key market driver moving forward.

The benefits are unquestionable, with the drive for efficiency savings being the core proposition. It enhances security reaction times – for instance if a door is forced the combined system will sound an alarm, lock-down key areas and direct the security team to the location of the potential incursion.

Integration makes installation and upgrades easier and more cost-effective and it renders full use of legacy and existing systems possible. There’s a massive growth in the use of BACnet protocols as well. These are adding a new level of software integration which is helping the move away from the remaining proprietary software that was once commonplace in the security sector.

Mike Sussman: TDSi's engineering and operations director

Mike Sussman: TDSi’s engineering and operations director

Of late, there has been some debate within the security world about the effectiveness and convenience of using passwords (both for physical access to premises and logical access to IT systems). Integrated security systems allow authorised users to minimise the security details they have to memorise and are likely to gain further interest this year because of this advantage.

The ability of integrated systems to intelligently provide access also means that workforce management is much easier using integrated security. From managing working hours to activating building services only when they are needed (and thus saving energy and resources), integration is providing intelligent solutions that will save real money in 2014 and beyond.

The increase in mobile working and the use of smart devices will also continue to steer security demands, offering convenient and secure access to integrated systems. However, by their (highly portable) nature, mobile devices pose the potential risk of unauthorised misuse.

Accordingly, though, mobile device manufacturers have ‘beefed up’ handset security and this has offset many of the potential concerns – in some ways echoing developments in the security sector itself.

Biometric security

Long promoted as convenient and highly secure, biometrics recently received further mainstream consumer adoption with the inclusion of fingerprint readers on iPhone 5s handsets late last year.

This use of biometrics has wider repercussions, too. As with mobile devices, experience shows that consumer adoption helps to facilitate business use so we would expect biometrics to find even greater popularity in 2014.

The quality and accuracy of biometrics have rapidly improved in recent years, moving on from fingerprint readers and now readily incorporating facial recognition (which is very well suited to ‘clean’ areas) and moving on towards previously niche and more complicated systems such as palm, vein and heartbeat recognition readers.

Security legislation

As well as the technology, legislation is moving forward to meet the demands of the security sector.

In 2014, we will see the publication of IEC 60839 entitled: ‘Alarm and Electronic Security Systems/ Electronic Access Control Systems – System and Components Requirements’ which aims to update the standard to take into account the latest integrated systems.

It’s being published at the IEC level (ie world standard) and also published by the BSI as a European (EN) standard.

As is the case with all new standards, IEC 60839 will have a profound impact on the security sector in 2014, pushing solutions providers further towards modern integrated systems and ensuring that they adhere to the developing needs of all customers reliant upon them.

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HID Global drives customer empowerment with security solutions at IFSEC International 2013

HID Global has announced that it will present its solutions for secure access control together with parent company, ASSA ABLOY, under the motto “Access your world” at IFSEC International 2013, which runs at the Birmingham NEC from 13-16 May.

Jointly presenting their solutions for the third consecutive year, this presence incorporates the combined power of award-winning technology from HID Global, ASSA ABLOY and ASSA ABLOY Group companies Yale, Mul-T-Lock, Traka and effeff in Hall 4 on Stands C40 and C50.

HID Global will highlight its latest iCLASS SE platform solution for credential encoding and conduct live mobile access demonstrations. In addition to showcasing its broad portfolio of solutions to create, use and manage secure identities, the company will also highlight its enhanced FARGO HDP5000 Printer/Encoder.

Harm Radstaak of HID Global

Harm Radstaak of HID Global

“We are very excited to be showcasing HID Global’s vast array of trusted secure identity solutions along with our parent company ASSA ABLOY,” explained Harm Radstaak, managing director (EMEA) at HID Global.

“Our customers will experience how our portfolio as well as complimentary products, presented by ASSA ABLOY brands, work well together. On the show floor, customers can learn how products and solutions from both companies can add to their business value.”

Radstaak continued: “IFSEC International is one of the leading security shows in the UK and provides us with an excellent and robust platform to interact and meet with security and industry professionals. We will be available to meet channel partners, end users, OEMs, systems integrators, security and IT managers to understand what key secure identity challenges need to be addressed in the workplace and how our future-proofed solutions can assist them.”

Extensive suite of technologies on display

HID Global will demonstrate its extensive suite of technologies, products, solutions and services including:

Solutions for Creating a Secure Identity

– Credential Encoding Solutions: The latest addition to the iCLASS SE open platform enables organisations to encode/manage credentials and configure readers by combining a number of existing HID encoders into a single solution. It provides the capability for organisations to securely manage their own keys and encode credentials to operate with iCLASS SE Readers. The solution supports Seos, iCLASS SE, iCLASS, MIFARE DESFire and other technologies.

– HID Secure Identity Services: A comprehensive suite of services to help customers address every aspect of requirements for cards and digital credentials for mobile access, including managing the daily flow of ID card badge requests, large-volume re-badging projects, and combining multiple technology platforms onto one credential.

– Card Personalisation Solutions: The most comprehensive range of printer/encoders for custom card personalisation, from creating high quality colour photo IDs to encoding smart cards. Solutions include Direct-to-Card (DTC) and High Definition Printing (HDP) printer/encoders. HID Global will demonstrate its enhanced FARGO HDP5000 Printer/Encoder and its Direct-to-Card (DTC) DTC1000.

– EasyLobby Visitor Management Solutions: HID Global’s enterprise-class solutions for visitor registration, badge printing, tracking and reporting. The solution is flexible, customisable and feature-rich to meet the needs of small and enterprise organisations with diverse visitor management processes and policy requirements.

– Embedded Technologies: Embedded platforms to enable third parties to develop hardware that works within the Genuine HID ecosystem, including HID Global’s new credential encoding solution, the iCLASS SE Reader Module and the iCLASS SE Processor that can be used across a variety of platforms to SIO-enable third-party hardware.

Solutions for Using Secure Identity

– Genuine HID Credentials and Readers: Latest Crescendo and pivCLASS credentials for strong PKI-based authentication supporting logical and physical control, OMNIKEY desktop readers, iCLASS SE platform reader solutions and credentials including iCLASS Seos for powering mobile access and higher security.

– Networked Access Solutions: New EDGE EVO and VertX EVO IP-enabled open platform access control solutions, and HID Global will preview new two-reader EDGE EVO Solo and VertX EVO wireless interoperability solutions.

Solutions for Managing Secure Identities

– Mobile Access Solutions: Technology-independent iCLASS SE access control platform including the iCLASS Seos credential that delivers advanced security, portability and flexibility while enabling the use NFC-enabled smartphones for access control and other applications.

– ActivID Credential Management Solutions: HID Global will demonstrate its latest identity assurance solutions, including its ‘One Card’ converged secure access solution for physical and logical access control and cloud-based applications.

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