Tag Archives: National Police Chiefs’ Council

NSI supports World Accreditation Day 2019

The National Security Inspectorate (NSI) offered its full support to World Accreditation Day 2019 (#WAD2019). A global initiative celebrating accreditation, the event (which took place on Sunday 9 June) focused on accredited bodies like the NSI adding value in supply chains. 

From a security and fire safety sector perspective, installers and service providers of security and fire safety systems and security guarding solution are a vital ‘link in the chain’ with their expertise at the point of delivery, keeping people safe, ensuring security solutions harness suitable technology and that they’re fit for purpose.

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Whether it be in the design, installation and commissioning of intruder alarms, access control systems, fire detection or suppression systems and CCTV or the monitoring of myriad guarding services, Best Practice in service provision by NSI-approved companies ensures that quality solutions are delivered to customers.

World Accreditation Day marked the work underway to launch ‘IAF CertSearch’, a website designed to provide buyers with the ability to verify management systems certificates such as ISO 9001 (itself a key component of NSI’s Gold approvals). This facility will help to distinguish certificates issued by accredited conformity assessment bodies (CABs), such as the NSI, from certificates issued by non-accredited CABs and to check the authenticity of a certificate.

Richard Jenkins, CEO at the NSI, commented: “World Accreditation Day plays an important role in promoting the value of accreditation and accredited conformity assessment. As an accredited certification body, the NSI conforms to ISO 17021-1 and ISO 17065 in the delivery of Certificates of Approval to over 1,800 approved companies operating in the UK and Eire. The worldwide system of accreditation spans economies accounting for 96% of global GDP*. The NSI is proud to play its small part in this ecosystem underpinning Best Practice, competency and consistent quality within our sector, as recognised by, among others, the National Police Chiefs’ Council, the Security Industry Authority, the Surveillance Camera Commissioner, BAFE and industry and insurer stakeholders.”

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Richard Jenkins

NSI Gold Approval combines Quality Management Systems approval ISO 9001 with specific product standards pertinent to services provided, in addition to NSI Quality Schedules and approval criteria specifically designed for the security and fire systems and guarding services sectors. The NSI adopts a ‘treat recommendations as mandatory’ stance with regard to all standards and Codes of Practice, affording buyers confidence that NSI-approved companies adhere to the latest Best Practice at all times.

For full details of the range of NSI approvals to international and British Standards and industry Codes of Practice visit www.nsi.org.uk

*Source: World Economic Forum

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“Autumn Budget must set clear direction for police funding” asserts Police Federation chairman

Amid all the talk and speculation on what will be contained in today’s Autumn Budget, the Chancellor Philip Hammond must set clear direction for police funding to reaffirm the Government’s commitment to keep the public safe. This is the view of Steve White, chairman of the Police Federation of England and Wales, who believes the current year-by-year approach to police budgets is inefficient and gives Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and chief constables little ability to effectively plan ahead.

“Chiefs and PCCs need to know what they’re going to get, not just next year, but in years two, three, four and five in order for them to properly plan,” said White. “The Government is already clear that policing needs to be even more efficient, but reform with at least a five-year funding strategy is needed for it to be sustainable.”

White echoed many in policing who have challenged the Government’s view that police budgets have been ‘protected’ between 2015 and 2020. “It’s all very well for politicians to say that funding is being protected, but the reality is there for all to see,” urged White. “The amount of money that police forces have to play with has gone down because inflation has gone up. It’s simple maths.”

The Police Federation’s chairman also challenged the idea that forces can simply tap in to reserves to plug the gap following recent comments made by Home Secretary Amber Rudd and the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners Joint Summit.

Steve White

Steve White: chairman of the Police Federation of England and Wales

“Of course forces have to keep something in reserve because they don’t know what’s around the corner or coming down the line in the next 12 months.”

However, White does appreciate the need for chief constables and PCCs to make clear to Government how additional funding would be spent, not just why it’s required. “There’s an opportunity for police leaders to provide a credible, evidence -based argument about why these additional resources are needed and where they would go.”

Finally, White made clear that PCCs, alongside chief constables, must challenge the Government for clear direction on police funding if it’s not forthcoming.

“If the Chancellor doesn’t set out any clear direction for police funding, PCCs and chief constables must put the pressure on Government to address this in the immediacy. If this doesn’t happen, officers and police staff will suffer with continued uncertainty and, ultimately, the public will suffer as well.”

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BSIA endorses new NPCC Security Systems Group guide to preventing false Hold-Up Alarms

The British Security Industry Association (BSIA) has contributed to a guide which aims to help installers of Hold-Up Alarm (HUA) systems to reduce the number of false alarms. Developed by the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s Security Systems Group, the guide provides an overview of the impacts that false alarms have and offers recommendations on how installers can help to reduce them.

These recommendations include:

*take HUA Systems out of service before work starts and remember to return them to full service when work has been completed

*remind users of the proper use of HUAs as advised by the police – they’re for use during an attack or the threat of an attack involving persons at premises protected by the HUA (a brawl outside the premises or petty theft is not proper use)

*recommend the repositioning of HUAs vulnerable to damage following changes to internal layout of premises

*ensure HUA fixings and covers are secure during service visits and remind users to report minor damage

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*remind users of their duty to inform contractors working at the premises that HUAs are installed and active

*discuss the correct use of HUAs with all employees who have direct contact with customers

These simple steps can help to reduce the number of false alarms, thereby reducing the impact on the police service and maintaining the reputation of Alarm Receiving Centres and installers.

David Wilkinson, director of technical services at the BSIA, explained: “The BSIA is fully supportive of initiatives to reduce the number of false alarms generated from security equipment. Preventing false Hold-Up Alarm activations will help to ensure that such alarms remain an effective method for delivering a rapid police response and maintain users’ confidence in security systems.”

Wilkinson continued: “The new guide provides installers with simple recommendations that can help to prevent false alarms during installation, maintenance and use. The BSIA is pleased to endorse the guide, and I’m sure that this document will prove beneficial to installers and service engineers alike.”

The guide can be downloaded from the BSIA’s website: www.bsia.co.uk/publications/publications-search-results/preventing-false-hold-up-alarms

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Essentra Security supports introduction of national Disabled Identification (DID) card

ID cards supplied by Essentra Security are being used to make life easier for disabled people. The ID cards – which, when printed, resemble a driving licence – negate the need for people to have to carry around documents verifying their disabilities.

There are approximately 11 million disabled people in the UK. The majority of impairments are not visible, with less than 8% of disabled people using wheelchairs.

The idea to create a national Disabled Identification (DID) card was thought up by Tanya Beaney following her observation that there were an increasing number of comments being posted on social media sites that disabled people were frustrated at having to constantly produce paperwork to prove they were entitled to some form of disability benefit in order to obtain a concessionary rate.

The DID card in detail

The DID card in detail

These cards works as certified ID for anyone who is registered as blind or is receiving qualifying disability benefits from the DLA, PIP, AFIP and the AA. It has been approved by various regulators of ID cards including the National Police Chiefs’ Council, the Security Industry Authority and Trading Standards.

Tanya Beaney’s idea has clearly caught the attention of a large number of people as their votes have resulted in the DID card making the shortlist for the semi-finals of the 2015 Virgin Media Pitch-to-Rich Competition.

Essentra Security supplied Beaney with a Magicard Rio Pro printer, software and ID card stock to enable her to set up a card issuance programme. The Rio Pro printer was chosen because of its reputation for being reliable, as well as its high print speed and an ability to offer single or double-sided printing.

Tanya Beaney

Tanya Beaney

“We’re very pleased to have had the opportunity to support Tanya with the launch of the DID card,” enthused Sue Woodcock, marketing manager for Essentra Security. “ID cards are commonly used day-to-day in so many different ways, including for access control, cashless vending, library systems, time and attendance and for visitor management systems. It’s good news that our ID solutions are now helping people with disabilities who are rightly entitled to concessionary pricing at theatres and museums, etc and for many other public environments.”

*Disabled individuals or their guardians can apply for a DID card by visiting: www.did-card.co.uk/apply.php

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BSIA issues White Paper on Information Destruction and revised guidance on Lone Working

The British Security Industry Association (BSIA) and its Information Destruction Section has announce the publication of a White Paper designed to be used as a guide for public sector agencies and any organisation wishing to benchmark against that sector and provide the correct protocols in the destruction of sensitive items and materials.

The guide references previously published guidance documents from the Cabinet Office and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) in order to promote the required specifications for data destruction and the importance of secure information destruction.

Entitled Information Destruction in the Public Sector, the document specifies which sensitive materials should be securely destroyed. Furthermore, it defines the varying levels of secure information and documents that should be disposed of in the appropriate manner.

Threat profiles are assessed and analysed in tiers of severity, while the White Paper also affords organisations guidance on specifying the desired outcomes that information destruction should produce.

Adam Chandler, chairman of the BSIA’s Information Destruction Section, has expressed how the White Paper might serve private sector companies and the public sector as a whole.

The security of information is an issue of paramount importance in the 21st Century,” asserted Chandler. “Data breaches can be more than costly. They can ruin a Government’s credibility as well as a private sector company’s reputation. British organisations must fortify their infrastructure by ensuring standards are upheld and that data is adequately disposed of. By adhering to the standards set by the Government and referenced by the BSIA in this White Paper; citizens, employees and civil servants will be better protected.”

*Download the guide in full at: http://www.bsia.co.uk/publications/publications-search-results/257-information-destruction-in-the-public-sector.aspx

BSIA publishes revised lone worker guidance documents

The BSIA has also just published revisions to two of its lone worker guides.

The revisions have been made to Form 144: A Guide to Buying a Lone Worker Service and Form 288: Lone Workers – An Employer’s Guide in order to reflect recent changes in the lone worker services market.

Form 144: A Guide to Buying a Lone Worker Service provides end users with advice on how to go about procuring a lone worker service that will be right for their business and what information needs to be prepared before a potential supplier is approached.

Form 288: Lone Workers – An Employer’s Guide provides employers with essential information about their responsibilities towards their lone workers as well as detail around what they should expect from a lone worker device, its supplier, an Alarm Receiving Centre and the response.

Steve Lampett, technical officer at the BSIA, explained: “The BSIA’s Lone Worker Section decided to update these very useful guides to reflect changes within the lone worker services market. While many of these changes are minor routine amendments, educating the marketplace is a key objective of the Association. On that basis, ensuring industry guidance is up to date is of vital importance.”

Amendments to the guides include the following:

Form 144: A Guide to Buying a Lone Worker Service

  • Reflection of the new requirement placed on the supplier highlighting the need to be flexible in terms of alarm escalation contacts (including at different times of the day/week, escalation and prioritisation processes)
  • Inclusion of a greater emphasis on the supplier to provide ongoing training options for the customer

Form 288: Lone Workers – An Employer’s Guide

  • Changes from BS 8484:2009 to BS 8484:2011
  • Addition of the provision for using the services of BS 8591 Category 2 Alarm Receiving Centres
  • Health and Safety Executive guidance updates
  • Reflecting the name change of the Association of Chief Police Officers by replacing it with the National Police Chiefs’ Council

Craig Swallow, chairman of the BSIA’s dedicated Lone Worker Section, stated: “We wanted to ensure that our guidance remains up to date and continues to be useful for end users to refer to when procuring a lone worker service. The Section therefore felt it necessary to update both Form 144 and Form 288. We expect further changes will need to be made to these forms and other BSIA lone worker publications when the current revision of BS 8484 has been completed in 2016.”

*The updated versions of Form 144 and 288 are available to download free of charge from the BSIA’s website: www.bsia.co.uk

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BSIA drives industry agreement on Interim Update of PD6662 scheme for alarm systems

Key organisations from across the security business sector have realised an industry agreement on an Interim Update of the PD6662 scheme for Intruder and Hold-Up Alarm Systems, reports the British Security Industry Association (BSIA). 

The agreement was written with the input of Trade Associations, insurers, inspectorates and the police service and has taken around four months to produce. The decision was made to publish the agreement outside of the British Standards Institution’s (BSI) own standards framework to allow for a more fundamental review of the PD6662 scheme to take place within the BSI and subsequently align with the introduction of the much-awaited second amendment to EN 50131-1, which is still under development in Europe.

In addition to the BSIA, leading organisations involved in the development of the agreement include the Fire and Security Association, the National Police Chiefs’ Council, the National Security Inspectorate, Police Scotland, the RISCAuthority and the Security Systems and Alarms Inspection Board.

A number of the BSIA’s Security Systems Section and Security Equipment Manufacturers Section members put forward their industry-leading knowledge during the consultation.

David Wilkinson: technical director at the BSIA

David Wilkinson: technical director at the BSIA

A key focus for members of the BSIA’s Security Systems Section and its Security Equipment Manufacturers Section has been to ensure that there was a method of enabling the use of mobile devices to set or unset intruder alarm systems. This is an issue that needed to be addressed as a result of the restrictions in their use through BS 8243 – the British Standard for alarm confirmation – coupled with the lack of clarity in the current EN 50131-3 standard.

David Wilkinson, director of technical services at the BSIA, commented: “The BSIA has played an instrumental part in shaping this agreement and we’re pleased that other industry organisations have also seen the benefit in contributing to it and aligning with it. The PD6662 scheme for Intruder and Hold-Up Alarms is somewhat out of date. This industry agreement provides the ideal opportunity to update the existing scheme and enable the use of mobile device technology in this important market sector while the full-scale review of the PD is undertaken through the BSI.”

The introduction of mobile technology enables professional security installers to use this technology, something which they could not do under the current PD6662 scheme. In turn, this passes on the benefits of using newer technology to the end users or purchasers of alarm systems.

The industry agreement will come into effect on 1 September 2015 and it’s intended that the content of this agreement will be incorporated into the revised edition of PD6662.

The BSIA will continue to influence the European standards that impact on intruder alarm systems to ensure that, wherever possible, the requirements in the industry agreement can be positioned at a European level, in turn negating the need for a longer term ‘national’ implementation.

*Published earlier this month, the BSIA’s Annual Review highlights some of the many standards the Trade Association and its constituent members have influenced in the past year. To download a copy or for more information on the BSIA visit: www.bsia.co.uk

**Futher information about the industry agreement announced (or, indeed, any other standard applicable to the UK’s private security sector) is available from the Trade Association’s Technical Department (tel: 0845 389 3889)

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Sir Hugh Orde to stand down as chief officers replace ACPO with new policing body

At Chief Constables’ Council on October 17, chief constables took key decisions on the development of a new body that will soon replace ACPO in co-ordinating operational policing at the national level.

In July this year, chief officers voted in support of proposals to establish a new co-ordinating body that would be hosted by – but remain independent of – the Metropolitan Police Service and replace the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO). These proposals were drawn up by a group of chief officers implementing recommendations made in General Sir Nick Parker’s detailed review of ACPO’s operations.

Following that mandate, the implementation group continued to develop a legal structure, operating model, a new secretariat structure and the process for a chief constable to be selected as an independent leader, seek a name for the new organisation and examine proposals for future funding.

The group consulted all ACPO members on how the new chairman should be elected, the potential name of the body and the emerging operating model. Final decisions were then taken by chief constables.

It was agreed that all chief officers would elect a chairman before the end of 2014. The intention is to ensure that the electorate is inclusive and that there’s broad support. Chief officers agreed a fixed term appointment of two years with a maximum of four years in office subject to satisfactory performance.

The National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) was chosen as the name of the new body to replace ACPO.

Proposals for an operating model

Members were consulted on early proposals for an operating model with three basic components: Chief Constables’ Council, an annual delivery plan and a range of co-ordination committees that will replace the business area structure currently adopted by ACPO. It was also agreed that more work was needed to develop the committee structure.

There will be a small team to support the elected chairman, provide planning and programme management and also communications support. Work is continuing to ensure that legal agreements are in place and that the new body operates both efficiently and effectively.

Sir Hugh Orde OBE QPM: standing down as President of ACPO

Sir Hugh Orde OBE QPM: standing down as President of ACPO

In light of these decisions, ACPO President Sir Hugh Orde OBE QPM is now in a position to stand down at the end of 2014 and allow chief officers to elect a leader who will head the new body. ACPO will continue to provide national co-ordination and leadership until the new body is constituted.

The new co-ordinating body will help the police service cut crime and keep members of the public safe by joining up operational response around the most serious and strategic threats. Focusing on operational delivery and developing national approaches on issues such as finance, technology and Human Resources, the NPCC will work closely with the College of Policing which is now responsible for developing professional standards.

ACPO’s core role of bringing together the expertise of police leadership to co-ordinate operational policing and agree national approaches in the public interest will be transferred into the new body. The aim is to develop a modernised and improved co-ordinating body that will be both sustainable and effective in supporting the police service when delivering at the national level.

The new co-ordinating body will be hosted by the Metropolitan Police Service. As part of ongoing plans the present company limited by guarantee will be dissolved.

Exciting new chapter in police leaders’ work

Speaking about these substantial and important developments, ACPO President Sir Hugh Orde OBE QPM commented: “Chief constables have met to discuss key decisions about how a new body co-ordinating operational policing at the national level will operate. It’s right that the leaders of the service take these decisions. This is an exciting new chapter in police leaders’ work. It’s essential that this process takes place seamlessly and with as little disruption to operational policing as possible.”

The ACPO leader continued: “To help create this seamlessness, I’ve decided to step down as President of ACPO around the end of the year in order to allow chief officers to elect a leader who will head the new body. I have made this decision after a lot of thought and after five years of having the immense privilege of leading a team of dedicated, talented and tireless chief officers whose passion for protecting their communities has been unabated in the face of changing modes of crime, seismic shifts in the policing landscape and the impact of austerity on the service. I want to thank all of my colleagues for their support and comradeship, along with all those others with whom I’ve served across 37 years as an officer.”

Going forward, key functions of the National Police Chiefs’ Council will be as follows:

*Co-ordination of national operations including defining, monitoring and testing force contributions to the Strategic Policing Requirement
*Command of counter-terrorism operations and the delivery of counter-terrorist policing through the national network as set out in the S22A agreement
*Co-ordination of the national policing response to national emergencies and the mobilisation of resources across force borders as well as on an international basis
*National operational implementation of standards and policy as set by the College of Policing and the Government
*Working with the College, the development of joint national approaches on criminal justice, value for money, service transformation, information management, performance management and technology
*Working with the College (where appropriate), the development of joint national approaches to staff and Human Resources issues (including misconduct and discipline) in line with chief officers’ responsibilities as employers

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