Tag Archives: LinkedIn

Criminals target UK’s youth as cases of identity fraud increase

Cifas, the UK’s leading fraud prevention service, has released new figures showing a 52% rise in young identity fraud victims in the UK. In 2015, just under 24,000 (23,959) people aged 30 and under were victims of identity fraud. This is up from 15,766 in 2014, and more than double the 11,000 victims in this age bracket in 2010.

The figures have been published on the same day as a new short film, entitled ‘Data to Go’, is launched online to raise awareness of this type of fraud. Shot in a London coffee shop in March this year, the film uses hidden cameras to capture baffled reactions from people caught in a stunt where their personal data, all found on public websites, is revealed to them live on a coffee cup.

Identity fraud happens when a fraudster pretends to be an innocent individual to buy a product or take out a loan in their name. Often, victims don’t even realise that they’ve been targeted until a bill arrives for something they didn’t buy or they experience problems with their credit rating.

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To carry out this kind of fraud successfully, fraudsters usually have access to their victim’s personal information such as name, date of birth, address, their bank details and information on who they hold accounts with. Fraudsters gain such detail in a variety of ways, including through hacking and data loss, as well as using social media to put the pieces of someone’s identity together. 86% of all identity frauds in 2015 were perpetrated online.

People of all ages can be at risk of identity fraud, but with growing numbers of young people falling victim, Cifas is calling for better education around fraud and financial crime.

Fraudsters are opportunists

Simon Dukes, CEO of Cifas, said: “Fraudsters are opportunists. As banks and lenders have become more adept at detecting false identities, so the fraudsters have instead focused on stealing and using genuine people’s details. Society, Government and industry all have a role to play in preventing fraud. However, our concern is that the lack of awareness about identity fraud is making it even easier for fraudsters to obtain the information they need.”

Dukes continued: “The likes of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other online platforms are much more than just social media sites – they’re now a hunting ground for identity thieves. We’re urging people to check their privacy settings today and think twice about what information they share. Social media is fantastic, and the way we live our lives online gives us huge opportunities. Taking a few simple steps will help us to enjoy the benefits while reducing the risks. To a fraudster, the information we put online is a goldmine.”

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Commander Chris Greany, the City of London Police’s national co-ordinator for economic crime, added: “We’ve known for some time that identity fraud has become the engine that drives much of today’s criminality, and so it’s vitally important that people keep their personal information safe and secure. In the fight against fraud, education is key and it’s great that Cifas and its members are taking identity fraud seriously and working together to raise awareness of how the issue is now increasingly affecting young people through the launch of this film.”

As part of the campaign, Cifas commissioned a survey with Britain Thinks to find out more about 18-24 year olds’ attitudes towards personal data and identity fraud. The survey found that young people are alarmingly unaware that they’re at risk:

  • Only 34% of 18-24 year olds say they learned about online security when they were at school
  • 50% of the 18-24 year olds surveyed believe they would never fall for an online scam (compared to the national average of 37%)
  • Only 57% of 18-24 year olds report thinking about how secure their personal details are online (compared to 73% for the population as a whole)

They’re also less likely to install anti-virus software on their mobile phone than the national average (27% compared to 37%).

Organisations such as the City of London Police, Action Fraud, Get Safe Online, Her Majesty’s Government’s Cyber Streetwise campaign, Financial Fraud Action UK and Cifas members including Coventry Building Society, BT and Secure Trust Bank are all supporting the campaign and sharing the new film across their social media networks.

Cifas is also appealing to youth organisations, schools and universities to share the film so it reaches as many young people as possible.

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Camlock Systems unlocks the potential of LinkedIn

Camlock Systems Ltd has launched its company page on the professional social network LinkedIn. Camlock’s followers can now obtain expert security advice, gain company insights, read market news and participate in related discussions.

Camlock Systems’ locking security experts work in partnership with customers to supply or design, develop and manufacture mechanical and electronic locking security using innovative technology.

By following Camlock Systems on LinkedIn, interested individuals have the opportunity to learn about the company’s products, markets, partnerships, career opportunities, Camlock’s team and more.

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LinkedIn further enables people to engage with Camlock Systems and the business’ many security experts, either by sharing and commenting on posts or by approaching a team member directly.

Camlock’s products are widely used in the self-service industries including vending machines, gaming machines and kiosk terminals as well as infrastructure and utilities cabinets and enclosures.

Rebecca Koch, international marketing manager at Camlock Systems, commented: “LinkedIn will give our followers and ourselves the chance to get to know and inspire each other. I would like to encourage everyone who’s interested in locking security to connect with us.”

*Follow the company on LinkedIn under https://www.linkedin.com/company/camlock-systems-ltd or visit the website www.camlock.com for further information

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CrowdControlHQ: “IT directors ignore social media risks at their peril”

Marc Harris (Chief Technical Officer at CrowdControlHQ) examines the issues facing IT directors from the use of social media.

Many IT directors operate their own personal Facebook and LinkedIn accounts. However, when it comes to corporate social media they pass responsibility for management of same to the Marketing Department. Are they doing so at their peril?

Let me start with the elephant in the room, namely the role of the IT director. After an extensive IT career in the media, telecommunication and technology sectors recent experience has led me to conclude that social media needs to be firmly at the top of the priority list of every IT director.

In my current role, I see at first hand the impact of reputational damage realised by both internal and external sources through the use of social media, and find it surprising how few IT directors are willing to discuss the issues or attend conferences on the subject. Perhaps they feel an unwelcome interference or ‘elbowed out’ by this new communication channel which has evolved extensively under the umbrella of marketing?

In future, the organisations succeeding in the social media space will have Marketing and IT Departments working seamlessly together to tackle the issues. The ‘DNA’ of IT makes it the most qualified department to deal with some of the risk issues that surround social media, so why isn’t it more involved?

Today, social media is being used in every aspect of business, from the Boardroom right through to the delivery of customer service. By its very nature, social media is a collective responsibility. Not surprisingly, its reliance on ‘collaboration’ has in some instances manifested itself as ‘sharing’ responsibility for posting of content… and even the sharing of passwords!

New rules now apply

I once overheard a social media officer quite gleefully boasting the fact that they had the Twitter login to hand for their company chairman. When challenged, the officer admitted that he was ‘The Chosen One’. If he was off sick that was it – no tweets or updates! Worse still, if he left the organisation he had the power to bring the place down tweet by tweet.

This is the stuff that would have kept me awake at night as an IT director, yet in a world powered by social engagement new rules seem to apply.

Marc Harris: CTO at CrowdControlHQ

Marc Harris: CTO at CrowdControlHQ

Recent research also reported that a scarily large number of employees still use the dreaded Post-It note to record their login usernames and passwords, stuck to walls, desks and even the computer screen. Apparently, we’re not coping well with the need to access everything online from social media to our weekly shop and fear our mobile devices could be pinched. We’re reverting to pen and paper, it seems.

This practice can only end in tears. There have now been too many examples of ‘rogue’ tweets, no audit trail of who posted them (or why) and organisations – who, frankly, should have known better – being left rosy cheeked, so why is this practice still so rife?

Why would an employee, with their job on the line, ‘fess up’ when they know that at least 15 other people had access to the account that day?

I also believe that few IT Departments have a handle on the number of users across their ‘official’ social media accounts, let alone a log of which password protocol they are using, how they are accessing the site or posting.

Need to look both ways

We cannot just blame the employees. Even organisations with the most robust and celebrated IT protocols let themselves down when it comes to simple issues such as data storage. I suspect very few IT directors are crystal clear about where their marketing communications teams are storing their social media campaigns, let alone harbour an understanding of the conversations from the past that they may need to reference in the future or where they keep their notes about their customers linked to these campaigns.

I would hazard a guess that many IT Departments are breaking their own compliance and governance issues when it comes to social media.

Today, there’s no need to share passwords. The social media ‘savvy’ have cottoned on to tiered password access, with both the IT and Marketing Departments having an ‘on/off’ switch to give them instant control in times of crisis. If IT is involved in the installation of a Social Media Management Solution (SMMS) they can see exactly who is plugged into the system, where accountability lies and who they need to train and develop to uphold the security protocols needed in order to keep an organisation’s reputation intact.

Within the scope of most IT budgets a SMMS will be a drop in the ocean but will address these major issues. Any smart IT director will already be looking at a SMMS if there isn’t already one in place. Such a system gives control back to the organisation. All passwords are held in one place such that accounts are not owned by individuals but by the company. The right system gives an organisation the ability to moderate content at a senior level. In turn, the risk of misuse or mistakes can be eradicated.

A SMMS also takes care of the practical management issues. I fear that some organisations are taking a step backwards in terms of their technological evolution, reverting to time-wasting, ineffective manual processing of social media (eg multiple logins to different social media platforms rather than using readily available tools for automation and effectiveness).

The message is clear. IT directors ignore social media at their peril. When it comes to corporate social engagement, it’s time for them to wake up, check and challenge.

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