Tag Archives: International Hologram Manufacturers Association

Anti-counterfeiting security technology receives accolade at Excellence in Holography Awards 2019

An advanced optical anti-counterfeiting solution for banknotes has won an award at the Excellence in Holography Awards 2019, organised by the industry trade body the International Hologram Manufacturers Association (IHMA).

Germany’s Leonard Kurz’s Kinegram Colors with ‘Flux Effect’ scooped the top slot in the ‘Best Applied Security Product’ category at the awards, which were presented by the IHMA at the annual Holography Conference in Athens.

KinegramColorsSingapore

Developed for the Singapore Bicentennial $20 commemorative currency notes issued in June , the effect’s use in the foil stripe marks the first time that a Kinegram with ‘Flux’ prominently features on a currency note as a critical security feature. In addition, the banknote marks the first time that a security foil has been applied to a fully offset-printed polymer substrate with a Steuer machine.

The Excellence in Holography Awards recognise outstanding achievement, marking success for those at the forefront of the sector who’ve developed innovative or commercially viable hologram products or techniques over the last 12 months.

ShandongHaomaoCigarettes

Also commended in the same category was China-based Shandong Taibao Anti-Counterfeiting Technology Products for its cigarette packaging anti-counterfeiting holographic paper, as well as France’s Surys, who’s Moov patch features as a high-level authentication feature on the new Sudanese 1,000 pound.

SurysMOOV

Attended by hologram suppliers, manufacturers and end users from around the world, the event saw IHMA chairman Dr Paul Dunn commend the standard of entries as extremely high, with all of them adding to an industry that continues to innovate, evolve and find new markets.

Dunn commented: “This award marks an ongoing advancement in the design, development and technology of commercial holograms, which continue to find fresh and innovative ways in which to add value and heightened levels of security to products used by billions of consumers the world over.”

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IHMA report reveals “strong demand” for packaging authentication technology

According to the International Hologram Manufacturers Association (IHMA), the Global Anti-Counterfeit Packaging Market Professional Survey Report 2018 signals the ‘added expertise… holograms provide in the authentication of packaging products’. This reaffirms the ‘strong and robust’ market for holograms among authentication devices in the coming years.

The report examines the anti-counterfeit packaging market in North America, China, Europe, Asia, Japan and India and forecasts production, revenue, consumption and import and export in these regions up to 2025. 

The market for global anti-counterfeit packaging technologies is set to continue to grow in the next few years, reaching more than US$357 billion by 2026Growth in packaging anti-counterfeiting devices appears ‘strong and lucrative’, states the IHMA, in the face of continued incidences of global counterfeiting and sector awareness of advanced track and trace hologram technologies.

Those involved in the packaging sector, including brand owners and converters, will benefit from the commercial opportunities built around anti-counterfeit packaging technologies identified in the report.

Counterfeiting: a lucrative business

Counterfeiting is very lucrative and the IHMA is calling for all in the packaging supply chain to apply pressure to tackle the billions of fake products inundating global markets. Security devices on packaged goods can ensure quality and check the distribution and smuggling of illicit products, while items not displaying security holograms can be seized and destroyed.

ManojKocharIHMAWeb

Manoj Kochar: chair of the IHMA

Reviewing the report, IHMA chair Manoj Kochar said people cannot afford to rest on their laurels when it comes to the war on counterfeiting. “Holography has a key role to play as an effective and highly flexible weapon in the ongoing battle to thwart the counterfeiters and fraudsters. All involved in the supply chain will be reassured by the presence of holograms on products and recognise the benefits they provide.”

The use of well-designed and properly deployed authentication solutions, as advocated by ISO 12931, enables examiners to verify the authenticity of a legitimate product, differentiating it from fake products emanating from counterfeiting ‘hot spots’ in Asia and eastern Europe.

Even those that carry a ‘fake’ authentication feature can be distinguished from the genuine item if that item carries a carefully thought-out authentication solution.

Detail on the IHMA

The IHMA is made up of 100 of the world’s leading hologram companies. Members include the leading producers and converters of holograms for banknote security, anti-counterfeiting, brand protection, packaging, graphics and other commercial applications around the world. Those members actively co-operate to maintain the highest professional, security and quality standards.

 

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New ‘opportunity’ for holography as IHMA welcomes Bank of England polymer banknotes

New polymer banknotes introduced by the Bank of England have been welcomed by the global hologram trade body which sees it as an ‘exciting opportunity’ to showcase the very latest developments in security devices for currency applications.

The International Hologram Manufacturers Association (IHMA) was commenting on the bank’s decision to start phasing-in new £5 polymer notes from 2016 after a period of public consultation.

New £10 notes will follow as the old cotton fibre and linen rag banknotes are removed from circulation and destroyed.

The polymer banknotes will be made from a thin, transparent and flexible film consisting of polypropylene which will be coated with a lacquer layer that enables it to carry the printed design features of the banknote. This will allow the inclusion of windows or clear portions in the design, used to provide enhanced protection and featuring holograms for verification and anti-counterfeiting purposes.

The IHMA says that other countries such as Canada have been using polymer banknotes featuring holograms successfully for many years. If the UK banknotes employ the same technology as the new Canadian ones, it’s another example of how holography continues to evolve as the leading security feature for notes.

Holograms on banknotes: the back story

Holograms have featured successfully on banknotes since 1987, evolving over the last two decades from simple patches to complex stripes as integral design and print features on notes.

Today, the annual global volume of banknotes produced is in excess of 125 billion*, so the reward for hologram producers capable of providing the technology to overcome the technical challenges is potentially highly lucrative.

Ian Lancaster: general secretary at the IHMA

Ian Lancaster: general secretary at the IHMA

The success of holograms for both polymer and paper banknotes has been down to their role as a Level 1 security feature that’s instantly recognisable. The technology remains to the fore as part of an array of overt features which make it quick and easy for not only the general public but also cashiers and those operating cash tills in stores to recognise whether or not a banknote is bona fide.

Increasing adoption of holography on banknotes reinforces the hologram’s position as a pre-eminent security feature in the global fight against counterfeiting. The use of sophisticated anti-counterfeiting features will mean that the banknotes will be more secure because they will include a larger area for holograms to be featured. New Zealand reported a big fall in counterfeiting after it introduced new hologram banknotes.

In Canada, for instance, the central bank is now producing a suite of five polymer banknotes featuring advanced ‘full-on’ holograms. This success could provide a blueprint for the way forward for the Bank of England’s new polymer notes, says the IHMA.

Effective weapon against the fraudsters

“Holography is an effective weapon in the battle to thwart banknote counterfeiters and fraudsters,” said Ian Lancaster, the IHMA’s general secretary, “and has evolved to become an important feature of modern banknotes.”

Lancaster added: “The Canadian banknotes are a great example of this evolution and illustrate some of the best and most technically innovative holograms on banknotes, which can work specifically with the window the polymer substrate offers to deliver real added value solutions. In fact, this is such an effective feature that paper banknotes are now being developed which have a polymer window.”

In conclusion, Lancaster explained: “Polymer substrates, like their paper counterparts, are now benefiting from this type of technology. We hope that the Bank of England will follow the example of Canada and others to have banknotes that are both potentially more durable and which feature the very best in modern hologram technology.”

*The Holo-pack•Holo-print® Industry Study

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