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Frost & Sullivan Report: ‘Sustained threats to oil and gas infrastructures boost need for security solutions’

New infrastructure development in the oil and gas industry and the growing threats to the security of critical oil and gas assets are encouraging end users to invest in security solutions.

Plant owners are particularly interested in security products, services and solutions that can detect and delay threats and are able to employ cutting-edge innovation and technology.

Acknowledging these requirements, market participants are offering user-friendly security solutions that create superior customer value.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, entitled: ‘Global Oil and Gas Infrastructure Security Market Assessment’, finds that the market earned revenues of $19.63 billion in 2013 and estimates this to reach $24.68 billion in 2021.

New infrastructure developments in the oil and gas industry and the growing threats to the security of critical oil and gas assets are encouraging end users to invest in security solutions

New infrastructure developments in the oil and gas industry and the growing threats to the security of critical oil and gas assets are encouraging end users to invest in security solutions

The study covers the segments of security services, command and control, screening detection, surveillance, access control, perimeter security and cyber security.

“Security system manufacturers will find more opportunities and earn higher profits from the upstream oil and gas segment than the midstream or downstream segments,” stated Frost & Sullivan’s aerospace and defence research analyst Katherine Evans. “Regardless of this, security system manufacturers must continue to provide solutions across all segments, with a particular focus on surveillance and intrusion detection.”

Uptake of cyber security solutions

As cyber security is currently not a spending priority among oil and gas companies, this area will bring limited opportunities for market participants. They are more likely to spend on safety measures such as fire detection and prevention than cyber security even though cyber attacks pose as much – if not more – of a threat than natural disasters.

The uptake of cyber security solutions is expected to surge with the passing of national and international legislation that highlights the need to protect oil and gas assets from cyber attacks, as well as initiatives to raise awareness of these standards.

“With the implementation of the aforementioned measures, cyber security will emerge as the highest priority area for oil and gas companies,” noted Evans.

“In preparation for this, market participants should try to integrate Internet connection sharing and ICT systems such that a holistic view of the infrastructure can be obtained. This will enable end users to ascertain where the attack threat is coming from, and treat the cause rather than the symptoms.”

*’Global Oil and Gas Infrastructure Security Market Assessment’ is part of the Security (http://www.defense.frost.com) Growth Partnership Service programme

**Frost & Sullivan’s related studies include:

• Global Airport Security Market Assessment Update
• Global Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Market Assessment
• US Defence Geospatial Market
• Global Physical Security Information Management Market Assessment

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‘Compliance with standard operating procedures will fuel uptake of PSIM software’ states Frost & Sullivan

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, entitled: ‘Global Physical Security Information Management Market Assessment’, finds that the market earned revenues of $195.7 million in 2013 and estimates this to rocket up to $835.6 million in 2022.

The global demand for Physical Security Information Management (PSIM) software is growing rapidly due to its ability to connect standalone security systems. This enables smoother business operations, improved situational awareness and response capabilities and significantly reduces costs by maximising the potential of the deployed systems.

The market will continue to expand due to increasing end user awareness on the benefits of PSIM software and the development of Internet protocol infrastructure that allows these solutions to be used almost anywhere.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, entitled: ‘Global Physical Security Information Management Market Assessment’, finds that the market earned revenues of $195.7 million in 2013 and estimates this to rocket up to $835.6 million in 2022.

'Global Physical Security Information Management Market Assessment' is Frost & Sullivan's latest report on the security space

‘Global Physical Security Information Management Market Assessment’ is Frost & Sullivan’s latest report on the security space

The study covers the application segments of mass transport, commercial, safe cities and first responders, Government, oil and gas, utilities and border and maritime. Safe cities and first responders, mass transport and commercial are currently the key revenue-generating segments.

Strong Standard Operating Procedures of PSIM software

“PSIM software is becoming popular as it has strong standard operating procedures (SOPs) embedded into it,” said Frost & Sullivan’s aerospace and defence research analyst Krzysztof Rutkowski. “This not only serves to minimise errors but also ensures that companies, utilities, Government institutions and other bodies comply with security regulations, which in essence allows companies to reduce legal disputes with insurance companies.”

However, the fear of temporary disruption to security operations that can occur during the installation of PSIM software lowers market adoption.

Further, the need to update all the standalone security systems in order to implement the PSIM software is boosting costs, in turn preventing smaller organisations from adopting these solutions.

“Vendors must roll out robust, easy-to-use PSIM with well-defined migration processes and present an existing client base that can recommend the solutions to other companies,” stated Rutkowski. “They must also build partnerships with system integrators across different geographies and market segments to ensure that the solution reaches interested end users, generates new business and develops a solid market position.”

*’Global Physical Security Information Management Market Assessment’ is part of the Security (http://www.defense.frost.com) Growth Partnership Service program.

Frost & Sullivan’s related studies include: ‘Global Cyber Security Market Assessment’, ‘Global Border and Maritime Security Market Assessment’, ‘Assessment of the Civil Security Market in India’ and ‘Global Mass Transport Security Market Assessment’.

All studies included in subscriptions provide detailed market opportunities and industry trends evaluated following extensive interviews with market participants.

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Frost & Sullivan: “Internal security needs and infrastructure modernisation spur Indian civil security market”

The Indian civil security market is burgeoning as left wing extremism and terrorist threats compel state Governments and police forces in the country to upgrade their civil security capabilities.

Market participants also spot considerable opportunities in the country’s need to modernise critical infrastructure such as airports, mass transportation and oil and gas facilities.

The Government emphasise on natural disaster management and securing the borders and coastline is also seen as a growth prospect.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.defense.frost.com), entitled: ‘Assessment of the Civil Security Market in India’, finds that the market earned revenues of $10.69 billion in 2012 and estimates this to more than double to $26.46 billion in 2020 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12%.

The civil security market in India has been assessed by market research analyst Frost & Sullivan

The civil security market in India has been assessed by market research analyst Frost & Sullivan

The research covers the segments of border and maritime security, critical infrastructure protection for airports, oil and gas, power and utilities and mass transportation, first responder C3i and emergency response, safe cities and cyber security.

Airport security followed by safe cities will be the fastest expanding segments, with growth rates of 31.2% and 21.4% respectively.

“The demand for equipment and technologies to address the existing capability gaps in India’s civil security is attracting global suppliers to the country,” said Frost & Sullivan’s aerospace and defence industry analyst Anshul Sharma. “Investment plans have been proposed by the central and state police agencies to improve the capabilities of various state police forces in areas such as communications, surveillance, weapon systems, combat uniforms, ammunition, ground vehicles and airlifting.”

Alterations to the defence offset policy

In addition, changes have been made to the defence offset policy that requires foreign vendors, who receive contracts of more than $60 million, to invest 30% of the deal value in the Indian market through offset partners.

They can now discharge their offset liabilities in some areas of internal security, thereby aiding market development.

However, with numerous companies offering various products and solutions, the Indian civil security market has become highly fragmented. Price sensitivity among end users in such a fragmented market adds to the challenge.

“To sustain profits, suppliers are looking to offer end-to-end security solutions,” noted Sharma. “As they do not have an integrated portfolio at present, market participants are quite likely to turn to mergers and acquisitions. Market consolidation will allow market players to expand their offer.”

For more information on this research send an email to Joanna Lewandowska (corporate communications) at: joanna.lewandowska@frost.com. Please include your full contact details.

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(ISC)² report reveals women’s perspectives and skills are ‘transforming’ the information security sector

The survey findings show that, despite a severe shortage of women in the information security workforce, females offer the right mentality needed to grow and diversify the security industry.

The new report, entitled ‘Agents of Change: Women in the Information Security Profession’ was authored by Frost & Sullivan and sponsored by Symantec.

This study reveals that women only represent 11% of the information security workforce, despite double-digit annual increases of personnel in the profession, yet they have the academic background and diverse perspective necessary to accelerate change in the information security industry.

The report highlights a severe shortage of woman in the information security industry, and why organisations globally need to shift attention to this critical problem.

Despite a severe shortage of females in the information security workforce, women offer the right mentality needed to grow and diversify the security industry

Despite a severe shortage of females in the information security workforce, women offer the right mentality needed to grow and diversify the security industry

Aspirations towards careers in information security

“The identified shortage of women in the industry only reiterates the importance of our Foundation’s offerings, like the women’s scholarships we award annually to female students aspiring to obtain information security careers, and the Safe and Secure Online programme, which brings (ISC)²-certified cyber security experts into classrooms to teach children how to become responsible digital citizens while introducing them to a career in cyber security,” said Julie Peeler, director of the (ISC)² Foundation.

“(ISC)²’s Chapters are also offering women in security mentoring and awareness programmes within their local communities to recruit more women into the field, but we need a broader and deeper level of education and engagement for women at a younger age before we can realise the level of impact required to solve the workforce shortage.”

Survey respondents were divided into two job title categories: Leaders and Doers. The Leaders (3,466 respondents) category included job titles such as executives, managers and strategic advisors. Doers (2,348 respondents) included respondents with job titles such as security analysts and compliance auditors.

In the Leaders category, more women (34%) were in consultant and advisor job titles than men (26%), and more than twice as many men as women were network security or software architects.

In the Doers category, 38% of women cited security analyst as their job title versus 27% of men. However, a higher proportion of men held security engineer and network administrator job titles.

The 2013 Global Information Security Workforce Study identified ‘security analyst’ as the number one most needed position in the information security industry, leading the way for a strong female presence in the future.

Job tenure, salary and academic background

The report also looks at average job tenure, median and average annual salary and academic backgrounds. In these categories, the report showed only marginal differences between women and men who work in information security fields:

• Women Leaders have spent an average of 13.5 years in the field compared to men at 13.6 years.
• Women and men Leaders both command an annual average median salary of US$105,000 per year.
• 91% of women Leaders hold a Bachelors, Masters or a doctoral degree versus 89% of men Leaders.

The findings revealed that women in information security, as a group, have a more diverse academic background than men, and a collective background with slightly greater emphasis on social sciences and business degrees versus engineering and computer sciences.

“The report data indicates that the perspectives of women offer viewpoints needed to elevate the security industry to the next level,” added Michael Suby, author of the report and vice president of research at Frost & Sullivan.

Key skills sets under examination

While technical skills are integral to developing a strong security posture within organisations, it’s important to supplement the proper skills and perspectives necessary to make impactful businesses decisions.

The report’s findings also demonstrate that the surveyed women believe a successful information security professional should maintain a variety of skills versus surveyed men, who believe technical skills should be the priority.

Women reported the following as the key attributes of a successful information security professional:

• Communication skills
• Broad understanding of the security field
• Awareness and understanding of the latest security threats
• Security policy formulation and application
• Leadership skills
• Business management skills

“Although efforts to fill the information security industry with skilled professionals have increased, the growing number of sophisticated attacks in our cyber landscape are posing an increased threat to organisations in both the public and private sectors,” added Suby.

“Combating these threats requires a community approach to training and hiring qualified security professionals from a variety of backgrounds. As our research reveals, women leaders are the strongest proponents of security and risk management education and training in the industry. This type of mentality is crucial to building standards in the industry and echoes the report’s findings that women are indeed ‘agents of change’ in the future of information security.”

Julie Talbot-Hubbard, chief security officer at Symantec, added: “Symantec believes it’s critical that we bring more qualified women into the cyber security profession. Through our support of this study, and our broader commitment to women in STEM professions, we hope to increase the representation of women in technology. In working with partners such as (ISC)², we are able to bring a greater awareness to this important issue.”

The full study can be found here: https://www.isc2cares.org/

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Global commercial biometrics market “to grow considerably” as awareness increases, states Frost & Sullivan

Increasing awareness of biometrics across industries will spur the global commercial biometrics market. While historically the adoption of biometrics has been concentrated in the Government sector, recent years have witnessed considerable demand for applications such as ATMs, retail Points of Sale and finance. Iris and face recognition algorithms have undergone substantial advancements and are gaining prominence, while fingerprint technologies remain the most popular.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan in a report entitled: ‘Analysis of the Global Commercial Biometrics Market’ finds that the market earned revenues of $1.48 billion in 2012 and estimates this to reach $6.15 billion in 2019. In addition to fingerprint, facial and iris biometrics, the study covers hand geometry, voice and signature technologies.

“Better end user recognition of the unique capabilities of biometric technologies, including enhanced security as well as physical and logical access control in applications, has helped vendors win a number of projects and contracts,” said Frost & Sullivan’s senior research analyst Ram Ravi.

“Focus on building robust, error-free and efficient solutions will create added revenue-generating opportunities for biometric vendors.”

Increasing awareness of biometrics across industries will spur the global commercial biometrics market

Increasing awareness of biometrics across industries will spur the global commercial biometrics market

Extended time for implementation

Although improvements in technology augur well for the market, any large-scale biometric project in enterprises takes a long time to implement and cover every employee. Since many businesses work within a restricted budget for a limited time span, the high cost and extended duration of deploying biometrics restricts installation rates.

Moreover, the lack of knowledge among customers, fear over loss of privacy and uncertainty over the reliability and security of stored data also dampen adoption of biometrics.

With awareness at an early stage, solutions providers, systems integrators and value-added resellers are the accepted channel for distribution. That being the case, their decisions will decide future uptake levels.

“Business strategies with customised ROI models and reduced opportunity costs are expected to help biometrics sustain momentum in emerging markets,” revealed Ravi.

“Regulatory mandates and procedures in compliance with medical standards are necessary to favour biometrics market expansion.”

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(ISC)2 report finds conflicting demands, goals and threats make enterprise security “increasingly challenging” for CSOs

C-level data from the 2013 (ISC)² Global Information Security Workforce Study illustrates paradoxes in application vulnerabilities and mobile devices and a shortage of qualified staff.

(ISC)², the world’s largest not-for-profit information security professional body and administrator of the CISSP, has issued new data that outlines the chief challenges faced by top enterprise security executives and illustrates the broad range of complex – and sometimes conflicting – challenges faced by today’s enterprise information security leaders.

Some key paradoxes the CXO study found are as follows:

Application vulnerabilities were the top-rated threat to the security of enterprise data (72% of executives rated it as a chief concern), yet many executives also reported that the demands of their organisations make it difficult to develop and implement secure application development processes.

Similarly, 70% of executives rated mobile devices as a top threat to their organisations, but many reported that they had not successfully implemented mobile security policies and programmes.

The majority of security executives (77% in the government sphere and 63% in private industry) believe they have too few people on their IT security staff, yet 61% cited business conditions as an obstacle preventing them from hiring more personnel.

(ISC)2 has issued new data which shows that top security executives are faced with a myriad of critical yet sometimes paradoxical security choices

(ISC)2 has issued new data which shows that top security executives are faced with a myriad of critical yet sometimes paradoxical security choices

Despite the concerns they registered over a shortage of trained personnel, more security executives plan to increase their spending on technology in the next year (39%) than on staffing (35%).

A View From The Top

The new report, entitled ‘A View From The Top – The (ISC)² Global Information Security Workforce Study CXO Report, conducted through the (ISC)2 Foundation, offers a detailed perspective on the attitudes and plans of 1,634 C-level executives from enterprises around the world.

The data was collected as part of (ISC)2’s sixth Global Information Security Workforce Study (GISWS) in partnership with Booz Allen Hamilton, and conducted by Frost & Sullivan. The study offers a snapshot of the priorities, plans and concerns of top security executives in a wide range of industries – and the challenges they face in making decisions in today’s dynamic, turbulent cyber security environment.

“Senior security executives, it appears, are getting sidetracked from the key security issues at hand as they balance the pressures of an evolving threat landscape and the business,” said John Colley, managing director for (ISC)2 in the EMEA region.

“They recognise application vulnerability is the number one threat and yet they are unable to devote their time, attention and obvious leadership in the field to help correct the situation. It is imperative that they keep a strategic perspective on security, looking at the issues holistically in order to develop effective solutions to deal with problems, the nature of which is constantly changing.”

The report data indicates that top security executives are faced with a myriad of critical, yet sometimes paradoxical security choices. For example, CXOs said that two of their chief cyber security concerns are potential damage to the organisation’s reputation (83%) and IT service downtime (74%).

Yet when asked how they spend their time, the top two answers were governance, risk and compliance (74%) and security management (also 74%), which indicates that administrative tasks and priorities dominate their daily agendas.

Security: the dilemma for information security executives

“Security is a dilemma for information security executives,” stated Michael Suby, Stratecast VP of Research at Frost & Sullivan and author of the report. “Data is proliferating and becoming more fluid, yet the need to protect it is greater than ever. Similarly, there is the challenge of today’s sophisticated attackers who are becoming increasingly skilled at hiding their exploits. The most significant threat to an organisation is what it does not know or cannot detect.”

William Stewart, senior vice-president at Booz Allen Hamilton, added: “It’s clear that chief security executives are faced with an array of challenges that cannot be overcome by any single methodology or set of solutions. One of the biggest obstacles security departments face is the dynamic interplay between an organisation’s business and IT priorities and the rapidly changing nature of the threat environment. To overcome this challenge, CXOs need to focus on prioritising critical assets, closely collaborating with the other organisational leadership and conducting thoughtful and forward-looking threat analysis.”

Likely the largest study of the information security profession ever conducted, the 2013 GISWS was conducted late last year through an Internet-based survey. Since its first release in 2004, the study gauges the opinions of information security professionals and provides detailed insight into important trends and opportunities within the information security profession. It provides a clear understanding of pay scales, skills gaps, training requirements, corporate hiring practices, security budgets, career progression, and corporate attitude toward information security that is of use to companies, hiring managers, and information security professionals.

The full study can be found here: https://www.isc2cares.org/IndustryResearch/GISWS/

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Frost & Sullivan: “Biometrics can revolutionise mobile payment security”

In terms of ‘pure’ payment protection, biometrics offer “undeniably higher levels of security” coupled with an “intuitive customer experience”.

With the explosion in smartphone usage, the number of payments carried out via mobile devices has significantly increased over recent years.

As eCommerce becomes mCommerce, the industry has to focus on payment security. During a Card Not Present process, a personal account number (PAN), expiration date and card validation code (CVC) are not enough to completely secure a transaction. Biometrics that provide high levels of security and an intuitive customer experience might be the solution for secure mobile payments.

“Protecting the mobile device itself is a first step towards secure mobile payments,” explained Jean-Noel Georges, Frost & Sullivan’s global program director, ICT in financial services. “Although a personal identification number (PIN) can do the job, in 2011 more than 60% of smartphone users were not using a PIN to protect their mobile access.”

Biometrics could be the future key to mobile payment security

Biometrics could be the future key to mobile payment security

Over the past decade many biometric projects have emerged with the aim of enabling user identification on mobile devices. In Europe, the MOBIO (Mobile Biometry) Project is noteworthy, with the aim to develop advanced biometric tech solutions for authentication on personal mobile devices.

Leveraging the existing technologies embedded within these devices (eg headphones, microphone and camera), the optimal solutions included voice and facial recognition as well as bi-modal authentication.

“The time is now right for biometric technology to emerge as a secure solution for mobile applications that require high levels of security, particularly payment,” said Georges. “From a pure payment security point of view, biometrics has already delivered significant advantages.”

Need for simple and intuitive payment solutions

The need to have a simple and intuitive payment solution precedes success. Natural Security, for example, developed a biometric Point of Sale (POS) solution based on fingerprint (veins or digital) recognition. The fingerprint reader connects to a contactless object (contactless card) to verify that the identified personal data matches the information stored on the card. This is a practically effortless payment mechanism that doesn’t require a PIN or card and provides a great customer experience.

“One potential mobile development could have a huge impact on biometric security solutions,” added Georges. “Rumours persist that the next iPhone will include a fingerprint sensor. Given that Apple acquired Authentec – with its TouchChip product family – in 2012, this is a strong possibility.”

The need for remembering PINs could soon become a thing of the past. With biometrics the user is the unique key to the device, application and payment security, making it a high rank of protection. However, even if these technologies are ready, the cost and complexity of integrating them into mobile devices make widespread roll-out a huge challenge.

Moreover, the end user will need time to accept this new way of interacting with his or her device.

Other projects have already appeared that use an individual’s personal magnetic field as an identifying signature. “We expect to see biometrics becoming increasingly prevalent over the course of the next three to four years,” concluded Georges, “driven by a desire among vendors and consumers alike to be better protected when accessing mobile services.”

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