Tag Archives: Euralarm

Next Generation Networks is focus of Euralarm Task Group Forum

The Europe-wide transition of traditional (ie PSTN) telecom networks towards all-IP communications networks that’s in different stages is having a significant impact on alarm signalling systems across countries. With this in mind, Euralarm’s Task Group on Next Generation Networks is now focusing on that transition.

Euralarm members the British Security Industry Association (BSIA) and the Fire Industry Association are hosting a high-profile forum on how changes to the UK telecommunications network may affect the fire and security industry. The event will be held on Thursday 15 March at the offices of UBM in central London and offers the opportunity to hear from the experts about what the impact of the transition will be.


Euralarm’s Task Group is also running a Workshop prior to the conference. To be held the day before, the Workshop is centred on developing an understanding of progress around Next Generation Networks across Europe. Members of the Task Group will consider what guidance and direction is of value to industry members and their customers going forward.

Euralarm members and other stakeholders and interested parties are invited to participate in the open forum, while the Workshop is for Euralarm members only.

More details about the Workshop can soon be found on the Euralarm website. Further information on the forum is available on the BSIA’s website.


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Electronic Fire and Security Industry Symposium 2018 topics announced by Euralarm

The newest edition of the Euralarm Symposium will take place in Bucharest on 4 June next year. In five years, the conference has established itself as one of the most important when it comes to significant market developments in innovation, legislation, regulation and standardisation as they affect the electronic security and fire safety sector.

Never shying away from controversial topics impacting the industry and with a view to providing business relevance, the annual event is aimed at Euralarm members, namely companies within the industry and national associations across Europe. It’s set to attract a large crowd. Notably, European stakeholders – both from institutions and advocacy groups – are expected to join the conference.


Topics for the 2018 Euralarm Symposium have been chosen for their broad appeal. The common thread will be the continually changing business environment and how this can be addressed to offset the challenges that globalisation and technological developments have set for the industry.

Qualifying to compete In today’s market, companies must qualify to compete. The EN 16763 Services Standard – one of the first to focus on the tertiary sector – was only a stepping stone. National players must now set out to outline how skills, experience and knowledge are verified and establish qualifications that are valid ‘across Europe’.

Keeping Security secure In the context of the EU General Data Protection Regulation and ever-evolving cyber security risks, the fire safety and security industry must define and implement measures to protect its products and solutions. Measures for IT infrastructures essential to the industry must be implemented while at the same time keeping European citizens secure.

Regulating construction products Euralarm’s Construction Products Regulation (CPR) Task Force is studying the influence of the CPR on the harmonised standards for fire safety. The objective is to develop a common understanding of how the CPR impacts the market today and how best to deal with the problems that Technical Committees such as CEN/TC 72 and CEN/TC 191 are facing. The Symposium will be the occasion for presenting and discussing the resulting publication and reaching out to EU stakeholders.

Lance Rütimann, Euralarm’s Advocacy Committee chairman, said: “The challenges for our industry are more complex with noticeable increases in both technical and regulatory developments and the resulting demand on new skills. We will embrace this exciting time with confidence to find the answers that can drive the growth and successful evolution of the market.”

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EUSAS and Euralarm organise conference on ‘Fire Safety and Security in the Aviation Sector’

In 2018, EUSAS and Euralarm will be running the second edition of the EUSAS-Euralarm Conference. Next year’s topic will be ‘Fire Safety and Security in the Aviation Sector’. The event is to be hosted by Airbus and will take place at the company’s facilities in Bremen, Germany on 10-11 July.

The conference will focus on fire safety and security in aircraft and at airports, as well as travellers’ safety, duly bringing together academics, innovators, executives and researchers from the European and US aviation industry, as well as from the fire and security industry.


Other participants involved in the event are testing institutes, certification bodies and standard developers interested in engineering and fire safety and security technologies applied to the aviation sector.

EUSAS is the European Society for Automatic Alarm Systems, a European platform for promoting security and protection engineering. Euralarm is the European Trade Association for the electronic fire safety and security industry and main representative of the industrial sector towards EU institutions in Brussels.


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Euralarm announces detail of 2018 Symposium in Bucharest

Euralarm has announced the date of its next Symposium, which will take place in Bucharest, Romania on 4 June 2018. This will be the second time that Romania has hosted this event, showing the country’s commitment to European electronic fire safety and security.

Euralarm member ARTS, the Romanian Association for Security Technique presided over by Liviu Mateescu, will host the event. “Romania is a market that’s expanding,” explained Mateescu. “For next year’s Symposium, we’re aiming to achieve the largest audience for this event to date.”


The Euralarm Symposium has become a ‘must attend’ event for professionals in the fire safety and security sectors. Every year, it brings together all stakeholders in the fire and security markets, including installers, system integrators, manufacturers, end users, facility managers and certification bodies.

Topics for the Euralarm Symposium 2018 will be announced later on this year. In 2017, the event focused on the future of fire and security services across Europe and turning the digital service market into business opportunities.


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Euralarm members in favour of revising EU’s Construction Products Regulation

Euralarm, the Trade Association representing the European electronic fire safety and security industry, has provided comments on the Inception Impact Assessment on a potential revision of the Construction Products Regulation (CPR). While supporting the main objective of the CPR, Euralarm feels that, in line with the actions of DG GROWTH, a review of the document is necessary.

According to Euralarm members, the CPR hasn’t had the required effect on the competitiveness of the electronic fire safety industry. The industry depends on standardised product performance requirements and standardised behaviour, which is at odds with the CPR.

For example, alarm buttons to activate a fire alarm system are always red right across Europe and the world. Under the CPR, this isn’t seen as ‘performance criteria’ and therefore the colour could change depending on national solutions, which could well lead to building occupants being confused in fire episodes and the lives of European citizens being put in danger.


Although the CPR’s stated objective is to help standardise test methods and ensure the European-wide acceptance of test results, thus supporting the movement of construction products across Europe, it’s also trying to cover a very wide range of products with very different characteristics and where performance criteria are less important. This has a negative effect on the standardisation of fire detection and alarm products.

Euralarm is prepared to explain the objective differences and the impact on the functionality and reliability of electronic fire safety products.

Based on initial consultations, Euralarm members favour revising the CPR (Option II of the Inception Impact Assessment), bearing in mind the successful role that standards have played in the market in terms of establishing clarity, flexibility and harmony. This is good for the European economy and its ability to participate in a global market which, after all, is all the main objective of the CPR.

Euralarm will continue to work hand-in-hand with the European Commission and, specifically, with DG GROWTH to define and implement the best possible solution.


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Euralarm outlines content of upcoming new study on false fire alarms in Europe

Fire and Rescue Services collect facts and figures during responses to alarms from fire detection and alarm systems. Now, Euralarm has reviewed the different approaches for data collection and analysis in England, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Austria.

A key observation is the differences noted between the examined countries. These differences hamper comparisons, although a view of the European norms would suggest the opposite. Euralarm is therefore calling for more co-operation between the stakeholders involved which would enable new insights into fire alarms in general.

Buildings are safer today because of the fire detection and alarm systems installed within. Indeed, without these systems, fires would go undetected and spread. Exit routes would be impassable due to smoke and fire, resulting in injuries and even fatalities, aside from damage caused to the building(s).


As is the case with any system, though, there are conditions that can lead to false alarms binding public and private resources as well as hurting the reputation of fire alarm and detection systems. False alarms can be reduced, for example, through the use of modern multi-sensor fire detectors as well as the regular application of correct maintenance requirements, making the systems reliable and dependable for building occupants.

In spite of such existing solutions, the market is lacking sufficient data that would outline the potential to reduce false alarms even more. An initial study by Euralarm in 2012 showed that data sources were missing and existing sources not comparable. Reliable details (eg data pools) on the range of false alarm difficulties and their causes are needed. At the moment, lack of such detail is hindering the development of a suitable basis upon which to define and deploy effective countermeasures.

The new study focuses on investigating data collection and analysis processes in order to achieve a better understanding of what needs to be done and, hopefully, will provide momentum for changes to be made.

Key observations

The review of the data collection process of transmitted alarms from fire detection and Alarm systems has been carried out by the Euralarm Task Group for False Alarms.

The project’s objective has been to analyse the specific methodologies by taking an empirical approach, with the aim of deriving a common understanding of the facts and figures collected during Fire and Rescue Services’ responses to fire alarms.

From the existing data pools, members of the Task Group then attempted to calculate the false alarm ratios based on four different models. In doing so, they then took the step of attempting a comparison between the investigated countries.

One of the observations of the review is that comparison of fire alarm figures in the respective countries is hampered by “missing alignment” in terms of common terminology and processes. A view towards the European norms would suggest the opposite, but the fact is that the application guidelines are national and these are the basis for any data collection. The analysed material recorded and collected by experts during responses to fire alarms is handled quite differently from country to country.

Lack of proper information leads to narrow or wrong measures being implemented, which is clearly detrimental to society and must be changed.

A fundamental understanding of fire alarms – and specifically false alarms – is a requirement for any attempts towards betterment. Since a common approach would (in principle) be possible, Euralarm proposes that the fire safety industry, Fire and Rescue Services and building owners work far more closely together on this matter.

*The full report will be published in Q4 2017


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EUSAS-Euralarm Fire Safety Conference focuses on R&D and standardisation

The results of cutting-edge research on fire safety were presented during a joint conference of EUSAS and Euralarm, the European research and Trade Associations in the sector. R&D’s potential impact on current and future standardisation work was a further point of focus for the event.

The joint EUSAS-Euralarm Conference took place on February 7-8 at the Berlin offices of Bosch Security Systems and determined to discover how cutting-edge innovation in the fire safety sector will drive the development of future standards and make buildings and people safer than they have ever been.

The event brought together 60 top specialists in the field of fire safety research, engineering and standardisation representing various European countries. Introducing the event were EUSAS chairman Professor Dr Andreas Czylwik, Euralarm president Enzo Peduzzi and, on behalf of the event’s host, Christoph Hampe.

The programme was divided into four sessions: false alarms, performance and quality testing, evacuation systems and fire safety in smart buildings.

As yet unpublished research on false alarms data gathered in Germany, Great Britain, Switzerland and Sweden was presented by Dr Sebastian Festag from ZVEI, the German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers’ Association, and Lance Rütimann from SES, the Swiss Association of Security Product Manufacturers. Both are Euralarm delegates in the Task Group on False Alarms and have derived a common approach to an empirical analysis of false alarm data.

Wolfgang Krüll from the University of Duisburg-Essen presented reproducible testing procedures for false alarms and three new testing devices which have been developed for those procedures. In parallel, statistics from Iceland were presented by Gudmundur Gunnarsson of the MVS Iceland Construction Authority.

The problem of testing a safety device’s performance over its whole lifetime was first presented by Thomas Litterst of Hekatron, including detail of a specific testing process he has developed. As demonstrated by Thorsten Schultze from the University of Duisburg-Essen, products currently on the market are largely compliant with current standard’s requirements on age limits and could potentially function correctly well beyond.


Raman Chagger from the Building Research Establishment in England also showed that optical smoke detectors developed in the 1980s function perfectly in modern environments.

Another matter is the mechanism of drift compensation, making up for the aging of a device and the build-up of dirt on sensors, which has the potential to delay the detection of slowly developing fires. That’s according to Florence Daniault from the Wagner Group.

Evacuation systems was the third topic. It was discussed by Dr Karl Fridolf from WSP, an engineering services group, who exposed the theoretical framework of human behaviour in situations of fire, and how behavioural aspects could be better considered in safety design.

Video fire detection and its influence on evacuation was presented by Dr Tjark Windisch from Bosch Security Systems. On the day, Dr Windisch called for greater efforts when it comes to standardising video fire detection.

The final topic, smart buildings, was first discussed by Raman Chagger from the perspective of visual alarm devices. He demonstrated how the product standard together with suitable guidelines in a code of practice needs to be based on more solid research.

Dr Peter Harris from United Technologies Corporation showed how favouring interoperability and data sharing in smart buildings could bring about ‘context-aware smoke detection’.

In a final presentation, Marc Chenevoy from Euralarm highlighted the difficulties inherent with standardising interoperable systems in smart buildings, but reported on positive progress being made within European standardisation bodies.


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