Tag Archives: Cyber Streetwise

Criminals target UK’s youth as cases of identity fraud increase

Cifas, the UK’s leading fraud prevention service, has released new figures showing a 52% rise in young identity fraud victims in the UK. In 2015, just under 24,000 (23,959) people aged 30 and under were victims of identity fraud. This is up from 15,766 in 2014, and more than double the 11,000 victims in this age bracket in 2010.

The figures have been published on the same day as a new short film, entitled ‘Data to Go’, is launched online to raise awareness of this type of fraud. Shot in a London coffee shop in March this year, the film uses hidden cameras to capture baffled reactions from people caught in a stunt where their personal data, all found on public websites, is revealed to them live on a coffee cup.

Identity fraud happens when a fraudster pretends to be an innocent individual to buy a product or take out a loan in their name. Often, victims don’t even realise that they’ve been targeted until a bill arrives for something they didn’t buy or they experience problems with their credit rating.

IdentityTheftNew

To carry out this kind of fraud successfully, fraudsters usually have access to their victim’s personal information such as name, date of birth, address, their bank details and information on who they hold accounts with. Fraudsters gain such detail in a variety of ways, including through hacking and data loss, as well as using social media to put the pieces of someone’s identity together. 86% of all identity frauds in 2015 were perpetrated online.

People of all ages can be at risk of identity fraud, but with growing numbers of young people falling victim, Cifas is calling for better education around fraud and financial crime.

Fraudsters are opportunists

Simon Dukes, CEO of Cifas, said: “Fraudsters are opportunists. As banks and lenders have become more adept at detecting false identities, so the fraudsters have instead focused on stealing and using genuine people’s details. Society, Government and industry all have a role to play in preventing fraud. However, our concern is that the lack of awareness about identity fraud is making it even easier for fraudsters to obtain the information they need.”

Dukes continued: “The likes of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other online platforms are much more than just social media sites – they’re now a hunting ground for identity thieves. We’re urging people to check their privacy settings today and think twice about what information they share. Social media is fantastic, and the way we live our lives online gives us huge opportunities. Taking a few simple steps will help us to enjoy the benefits while reducing the risks. To a fraudster, the information we put online is a goldmine.”

IdentityTheftSign

Commander Chris Greany, the City of London Police’s national co-ordinator for economic crime, added: “We’ve known for some time that identity fraud has become the engine that drives much of today’s criminality, and so it’s vitally important that people keep their personal information safe and secure. In the fight against fraud, education is key and it’s great that Cifas and its members are taking identity fraud seriously and working together to raise awareness of how the issue is now increasingly affecting young people through the launch of this film.”

As part of the campaign, Cifas commissioned a survey with Britain Thinks to find out more about 18-24 year olds’ attitudes towards personal data and identity fraud. The survey found that young people are alarmingly unaware that they’re at risk:

  • Only 34% of 18-24 year olds say they learned about online security when they were at school
  • 50% of the 18-24 year olds surveyed believe they would never fall for an online scam (compared to the national average of 37%)
  • Only 57% of 18-24 year olds report thinking about how secure their personal details are online (compared to 73% for the population as a whole)

They’re also less likely to install anti-virus software on their mobile phone than the national average (27% compared to 37%).

Organisations such as the City of London Police, Action Fraud, Get Safe Online, Her Majesty’s Government’s Cyber Streetwise campaign, Financial Fraud Action UK and Cifas members including Coventry Building Society, BT and Secure Trust Bank are all supporting the campaign and sharing the new film across their social media networks.

Cifas is also appealing to youth organisations, schools and universities to share the film so it reaches as many young people as possible.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Risk UK News, Uncategorized

Cyber Streetwise survey reveals 75% of Britons place online safety at risk

A new survey conducted by Cyber Streetwise has revealed that most people are not taking the necessary steps to protect their identity online, with 75% of those who took part in the study admitting they don’t follow Best Practice to create complex passwords.

The figures have been released during Cyber Security Awareness Month to mark the launch of the latest phase of the UK Government’s Cyber Streetwise campaign. In partnership with the police service and industry experts, Cyber Streetwise aims to raise awareness of wise and unwise behaviour in the online space.

Despite 95% of Britons saying it’s their own responsibility to protect themselves online, two thirds are risking their safety by not using symbols in passwords. Nearly half (47%) exhibit other unsafe password habits such as using pet names or significant dates as their password.

Modern Slavery and Organised Crime Minister Karen Bradley MP explained: “When passwords are compromised, financial and banking details can be stolen and cause problems for the person affected, for businesses and for the economy. There’s an emotional impact caused by the loss of irreplaceable photos, videos and personal e-mails, but even worse these can be seized to extort money.”

Bradley added: “We can and must play a role in reducing our risk of falling victim to cyber crime. Most attacks can be prevented by taking some basic security steps, and I encourage everyone to do so.”

Vulnerability to ID theft, fraud and extortion

This latest research shows that 82% of people manage more online accounts that require a password than they did last year, with the average Briton dealing with 19. Over a third (35%) of those questioned admit that they do not create strong passwords because they struggle to recall them. However, poor passwords leave people vulnerable to identity theft, fraud and extortion.

Cyber crime presents a serious threat to the UK and the Government is taking action to increase public awareness of the risk, dedicating £860 million to this issue over the next five years through the National Cyber Security Programme. In essence, the Government is working hard to transform the UK’s response to cyber security.

The latest survey conducted by Cyber Streetwise has revealed that the majority of people are not taking necessary steps to protect their identity online

The latest survey conducted by Cyber Streetwise has revealed that the majority of people are not taking necessary steps to protect their identity online

Jamie Saunders – director of the National Crime Agency’s (NCA) National Cyber Crime Unit – commented: “The NCA is working closely with law enforcement colleagues all over the world to target and disrupt cyber criminals. We should be clear that the criminals will target weaknesses. On that basis, having weak passwords will leave people vulnerable.”

Saunders continued: “Nobody wants their personal financial details, business information or photographs to be stolen or held to ransom, so simple things like using three or more words, a mixture of numbers, letters and symbols and upper and lower case letters will make it much more difficult for hackers to access personal information.”

Creating strong and memorable passwords

Advice on creating strong and memorable passwords can be found at http://www.cyberstreetwise.com along with other easy tips for staying safe online. Tips for creating and remembering passwords include the following:

Loci method
Imagine a familiar scene and place each item that needs to be remembered in a particular location (ie a red rose on the table, a book on the chair, a poster on the wall). Imagine yourself looking around the room in a specific sequence. Re-imagine the scene and the location of each item when you need to remember

Acronyms
Use a phrase or a sentence and take the first letter from that sentence

Narrative methods
Remember a sequence of key words by creating a story and littering it with memorable details (for example, ‘The little girl wore a bright yellow hat as she walked down the narrow street…’)

Further information on Cyber Security Awareness Month is available at: http://www.staysafeonline.org/ncsam/

Leave a comment

Filed under Risk UK News

Top 10 online-enabled frauds hitting British wallets to the tune of £670 million

Organisers of Get Safe Online – the joint public-private sector Internet safety initiative – have revealed the financial and emotional cost of cyber crime. In a specially commissioned poll of 2,000 people by Vision Critical for Get Safe Online Week 2014 (running from 20 to 26 October), half (50%) of those who have been a victim of cyber crime (including online fraud or cases resulting in economic loss, ID theft, hacking or deliberate distribution of viruses and online abuse) said they felt either ‘very’ or ‘extremely’ violated by their ordeal.

Separate figures prepared by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) for Get Safe Online Week offer an indication as to the sheer scale of online crime, with over £670 million lost nationwide to the Top 10 Internet-enabled frauds reported between 1 September 2013 and 31 August this year. The £670 million statistic emanates from reported instances of fraud, calculated when the first contact with victims was via an online function.

Given that a significant number of Internet-enabled fraud cases still pass by unreported, the true economic cost to the UK is likely to be significantly higher.

The Get Safe Online survey also reveals that over half (53%) of the population now views online crime just as seriously as they do ‘physical world’ crimes, destroying the notion that online crime is ‘faceless’ and less important than other crimes. As a result, more cyber crime victims (54%) wish to unmask a perpetrator but only 14% have succeeded in doing so.

Get Safe Online Week 2014 is focused on awareness around individuals not becoming the victim of cyber fraud

Get Safe Online Week 2014 is focused on awareness around individuals not becoming the victim of cyber fraud

As stated, half (50%) of those individuals surveyed for Get Safe Online Week have been a victim of online crime although only 32% of these people reported the fact. Around half (47%) of victims did not know to whom they should report an online crime, although this figure is expected to drop due to the ongoing work of Action Fraud (the UK’s national fraud reporting centre) and the considerable Government resources now dedicated to fighting cyber crime.

On a more positive note, victims in the Get Safe Online poll said that their experiences have shocked them into changing their behaviour for the better, with nearly half (45%) opting for stronger passwords and 42% now being extra vigilant when shopping online. Over a third (37%) always log out of accounts when they go offline and nearly a fifth (18%) have changed their security settings on their social media accounts.

In stark contrast, however, most people still don’t have the most basic protection in place. More than half (54%) of mobile phone users and around a third (37%) of laptop owners do not have a password or PIN number for their device. That figure rises to over half (59%) for PC users and two thirds (67%) when it comes to tablet owners.

The 'Don't Be A Victim' Infographic produced by the team at Get Safe Online

The ‘Don’t Be A Victim’ Infographic produced by the team at Get Safe Online

Supporting law enforcement’s response to cyber crime

Commenting on the survey results, Francis Maude (Minister for the Cabinet Office) stated: “The UK cyber market is worth over £80 billion a year and rising. The Internet is undoubtedly a force for good, but we simply cannot stand still in the face of these threats which already cost our economy billions every year.”

Maude continued: “As part of this Government’s long-term economic plan, we want to make the UK one of the most secure places in which to do business in cyberspace. We have an £860 million Cyber Security Programme in place which supports law enforcement’s response to cyber crime, and we’re also working with the private sector to help all businesses protect their vital information assets.”

Francis Maude MP: Minister for the Cabinet Office

Francis Maude MP: Minister for the Cabinet Office

In conclusion, the Cabinet Office leader added: “Our Get Safe Online and Cyber Streetwise campaigns provide easy to understand information for the public on how and why they should protect themselves. Cyber security is not an issue for Government alone. We must all take action to defend ourselves against the threats now being posed.”

Tony Neate, CEO at Get Safe Online, explained: “Our research shows just how serious a toll cyber crime can take, both on the wallet and on well-being. This has been no more apparent than in the last few weeks with various large-scale personal photo hacks of celebrities and members of the general public. Unfortunately, this is becoming more common now that we live a greater percentage of our lives in the online space.”

Neate went on to state: “This year, Get Safe Online Week is all about ‘Don’t Be A Victim’. We can all take simple steps to protect ourselves, including putting a password on our computers and mobile devices, never clicking on a link sent by a stranger, using strong passwords and always logging off from an account or website when we’re finished. The more the public do this, the more criminals will not be able to hide behind a cloak of anonymity.”

Tony Neate: CEO at Get Safe Online

Tony Neate: CEO at Get Safe Online

Detective Superintendent Pete O’Doherty, head of the NFIB at the City of London Police, said: “Cheap and easy access to the Internet is changing the world and transforming our lives. What many of us may be less aware of is the fact that financial crime has moved online and poses a major threat to people of all ages and from all walks of life. Men and women, young and old, rich and poor. It matters little who you are, where you live or what you do.”

O’Doherty continued: “It’s vitally important people are fully aware of the dangers around fraud and Internet-enabled fraud which is why the City of London Police, in its role as the National Policing Lead for Fraud and home to the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau, is fully supportive of Get Safe Online’s week of action.”

Importantly, O’Doherty added: “I would also call on anyone who has fallen victim to an online fraud to report this to Action Fraud. It’s only then that local police forces will be able to track down the main offenders and ensure victims receive the best possible support as they try to recover from what can be an extremely difficult and upsetting experience.”

Have you been a victim of cyber-enabled fraud?

George Anderson, director of product marketing at Internet security specialist Webroot, has also offered his views on the survey results.

“It’s sad but not surprising that 53% of British people have fallen victim to cyber crime,” asserted Anderson. “The Internet has been assimilated into our daily lives to the point where it’s easy to forget how hazardous it is if the proper security measures are not taken.”

Anderson continued: “The key to making the UK a safe Internet user zone is education. As a country, as communities and as individuals we should be actively promoting awareness of Internet safety and security issues. The Government’s research should not scare people away from online activities, but rather start the process of serious and continuous conversations whereby we evaluate the online precautions we take both at home and at work. Education should start at an early age, with parents and education bodies working to ensure future generations populated by ‘security savvy’ individuals.”

Adding to that message, Anderson said: “Understanding what preventative measures we can take ranges from a rudimentary awareness through to in-depth technical knowledge. However, far too many people have become too complacent with modern technology to even practice the basics. The modern person should by now know that computers ought to be protected by updated, Best-of-Breed anti-spyware and anti-virus software. They should practice safe surfing habits and harbour a full comprehension of online activities that would place their information at more risk than others. Also, they ought to be able to identify and understand website privacy policies and know when or when not to impart information regarding personal data.”

*If you think you may have been the victim of cyber-enabled economic fraud (ie where you have lost money), you should report the occurrence to Action Fraud and include as much detail as possible. Telephone: 0300 123 2040. Alternatively, visit: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk

**If you have been the victim of online abuse or harassment, you should report it to your local police force

***For general advice on how to stay safe online visit: http://www.GetSafeOnline.org

Leave a comment

Filed under Risk UK News

UK Government campaign urges citizens to be Cyber Streetwise

A new campaign designed to change the way in which people protect themselves while shopping, banking or socialising online in order to avoid falling victim to cyber criminals has been launched today by the UK Government.

The Cyber Streetwise campaign aims to change the way people view online safety and provide members of the public and businesses alike with the necessary skills and knowledge required for them to take control of their own cyber security.

Building on the National Cyber Security Programme1, the campaign includes a new easy-to-use website and online videos.

With more than 11 million Internet-enabled devices received as gifts during the Christmas period2, Cyber Streetwise will help in the fight against online criminals. People are encouraged to protect themselves and their families online by visiting the website for tips and advice.

The new website, http://www.cyberstreetwise.com, offers a range of interactive resources, tailoring an individual’s visit to provide clear advice on the essentials for enjoying a safe experience online.

Security minister James Brokenshire

Security minister James Brokenshire

Security minister James Brokenshire said: “The Internet has radically changed the way we work and socialise. It has created a wealth of opportunities, but with these opportunities there are also threats. As a Government we are taking the fight to cyber criminals wherever they are in the world.”

Brokenshire continued: “‘However, by taking a few simple steps while online the public can keep cyber criminals out and their information safe. Cyber Streetwise is an innovative new campaign that will provide everyone with the knowledge and confidence to make simple and effective changes to stay safe online.”

National Cyber Security Programme

The launch of the campaign is part of the UK Government’s National Cyber Security Programme1 and comes at a time when an increasing number of people use the web on their laptops, tablets and smart phones.

Findings from the Government’s most recent National Cyber Security Consumer Tracker3 suggest that more than half the population are not taking simple actions to protect themselves online.

While 94% of people believe it’s their personal responsibility to ensure a safe Internet experience, the research highlights the facts that:

• only 44% always install Internet security software on new equipment
• only 37% download updates and patches for personal computers when prompted… a figure which falls even further to a fifth (21%) for smart phones and mobile devices
• less than a third (30%) habitually use complex passwords to protect online accounts
• 57% do not always check websites are secure before making a purchase

The Cyber Streetwise campaign underlines that safety precautions taken in the real world have similar relevance in the virtual world. Research shows that shoppers don’t adopt the same behaviours when shopping online as contrasted with shopping on the High Street. A person wouldn’t walk around with their bag open or wallet on show yet, when shopping online and due to the speed of technology, people can be open to unnecessary risk if they’re not careful when using their credit card.

Five key actions to prevent cyber crime

There are five actions people can take in order to protect themselves and others from cyber crime. The key behaviours the campaign is focusing on changing are:

1. Using strong, memorable passwords
2. Installing anti-virus software on new devices
3. Checking privacy settings on social media
4. Shopping safely online, always ensuring to check online retail sites are secure
5. Downloading software and application patches when prompted

The research shows our biggest concerns when it comes to online safety are identity theft (48%) and losing money (52%). 16% of those surveyed claim to have lost at least £500 as a result of having their card details stolen and used over the Internet (representing a total loss of more than £4 billion).

Almost a third (32%) of those who admit to not installing security software on Internet-enabled devices blame a lack of understanding, while around a fifth (18%) say they did not realise the risk.

With initial funding allocated from the Government’s National Cyber Security Programme, the Cyber Streetwise campaign has been joined by a number of private sector partners who are providing support and investment. Among those involved are Sophos, Facebook, the RBS Group and Financial Fraud Action UK.

References

1. For further information on the National Cyber Security Programme, visit: https://www.gov.uk/government/policies/keeping-the-uk-safe-in-cyberspace

2. Figure provided by retail experts Conlumino and based on items bought in the five weeks up to and including Christmas Week 2013. Figure includes tablets, smart phones, connected e-readers, laptops, desktops and connected games consoles. Data derived from Christmas tracker which surveyed 22,762 consumers over the run-up to Christmas 2013

3. National Cyber Security Consumer Tracker – Wave 3, October 2013

Figure based on 16% of the adult UK population (8,028,924) Population Estimates for UK, England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, Mid-2012 Release, Office for National Statistics, 8 August 2013

4. Cyber Streetwise is a cross-Government awareness and behaviour change campaign delivered by the Home Office in conjunction with the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills alongside the National Crime Agency and Action Fraud and supported by the National Cyber Security Programme (Cabinet Office)

5. The campaign has wide support across industry with over 20 organisations providing access to communications channels to reach their customers or providing monetary support. Organisations involved include: Sophos, Facebook, Financial Fraud Action UK, RBS, Trend Micro and Vodafone

6. The Cyber Streetwise campaign launched on Monday 13 January 2014 with outdoor, radio and digital advertising. The advertising campaign has been designed by M&C Saatchi. To view and download assets please visit: http://www.consolpr.com/outbound/JAN/Cyberstreetwisecollateral.zip

7. To view the online videos visit: http://www.youtube.com/user/becyberstreetwise/videos

Leave a comment

Filed under IFSECGlobal.com News