Tag Archives: Code of Practice

Notifier introduces BS 7273-4 CPD course on release mechanisms for fire doors

Notifier by Honeywell has announced the launch of a new Continuing Professional Development (CPD) course for 2016-2017.  ‘Getting To Know BS 7273-4’
provides installers, integrators, contractors, consultants and end users with all the information on this important standard and how it relates to the way that doors are opened, closed and controlled by fire detection systems.

Although it was first introduced in 2007, the 2015 revision of BS 7273-4 has brought the subject of release mechanisms for fire doors into sharp focus. The prompt evacuation of a burning building requires as few obstacles and obstructions as possible and, similarly, restricting the spread of fire and heat in such a situation relies upon the use of well-engineered fire doors that can be reliably closed in the event of a fire.

Adhering to BS 7273-4 is increasingly important. The guidance in Annex A of the Code of Practice is now normative, which means that, if control of doors is performed by a fire detection system, the requirements of the category must be met. If the guidelines are not followed, it’s likely that the fire door provision fails to satisfy a fire risk assessment.

Notifier’s new BS 7273-4 CPD course has been written by experts within the company. It enables delegates to gain a better understanding of how modern life safety technology can be used to increase a building’s safety by interfacing it with fire doors and secured fire exits. By providing an overview of the various scenarios when doors should be released, it looks at control arrangements for the actuation of mechanisms that unlock, release or open doors in the event of a fire episode before going on to cover recommendations for the interface between fire detection and alarm systems, as well as equipment not covered in any other standards.

notifiercpd

Those attending the course will also gain an valuable understanding of the three categories of actuation – A (Critical), B (Standard) and C (Indirect) – and the circumstances under which the control mechanisms should revert to their fail safe position in order to protect escape routes and prevent the spread of smoke in the event of fire.

“It’s fair to say that, since its original introduction eight years ago, BS 7273-4 has been largely ignored apart for a few isolated cases of Best Practice,” commented Gregg Bushell, senior marketing communications specialist at Honeywell Security and Fire.

“I’m pleased to say that the situation is beginning to change. This CPD course is a key part of our strategy to enhance knowledge about this important standard and how its implementation could save lives. There can be no ‘one size fits all’ approach to configuring a BS 7273-4 compliant system. Fire doors and exits should be considered individually such that people, property and assets are protected as well as they possibly can be in the event of a fire.”

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Exhibitors set to showcase innovative surveillance solutions at BSIA’s CCTV seminar

A number of companies involved in the design, installation and operation of CCTV systems will be exhibiting as part of a sold-out seminar in London this week.

Organised by the British Security Industry Association (BSIA), the event will take place at London’s Emmanuel Centre on Marsham Street – close to the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey – on Thursday 12 November. The seminar will cover a variety of interesting topics including the latest changes in surveillance legislation and technology, while also exploring recent developments in the CCTV sector.

Running alongside the seminar, the exhibition will give delegates the opportunity to ‘get hands-on’ with some of the most innovative products in the industry.

Exhibitors that will be showcasing their products on the day include:

ATEC Security

ATEC Security is a specialist security systems integrator and winner of multiple Security Excellence Awards.

The ATEC Difference is about creating value not only through security innovation, but also by ensuring security projects deliver financial, operational, staff and business intelligence benefits.

ATEC takes the time to understand your issues, your operating environment and your business and then delivers reliable integrated solutions and support built around your operational requirements.

The company achieves “unparalleled quality” through meticulous design, comprehensive documentation and rigorous project management, with processes built around UK Home Office Best Practice advice.

Customers include security professionals at London City Airport, the City of Westminster and First Capital Connect.

Find out more by visiting www.atec-security.co.uk

Dedicated Micros

Dedicated Micros will be showcasing its latest cost-effective HD IP and analogue product ranges. Based on a ‘unique’ architecture, these solutions provide greater reliability, connectivity, interaction and performance across a seamless operating system.

For more information visit www.dedicatedmicros.com

Bosch Security Systems

Bosch Security Systems will be showcasing some of its latest in-camera technologies.

Starlight technology offers a new quality standard in round-the-clock video surveillance. Regardless of lighting conditions, time of day or object movement, cameras deliver “incredible levels of detail”.

Intelligent Video Analysis (IVA) assists by alerting you as to when pre-defined alarms are triggered, By smartly combining up to 8 IVA rules, complex tasks are made easy and false alarms reduced.

Content-Based Imaging Technology (CBIT) offers three main features: Intelligent Dynamic Noise Reduction, Intelligent Auto Exposure and Intelligent Tracking. The first of these intelligently distinguishes between noise and relevant information, such as movement. This reduces bitrate by up to 50%.

Find out more by visiting http://uk.boschsecurity.com

National Security Inspectorate

The NSI is the certification body for the UK’s leading providers of security and fire safety services.

Over 1,800 organisations commit to rigorous and regular checks by NSI’s national network of qualified auditors who carry out something in the region of 4,000 audits per year, verifying compliance with relevant British Standards and industry Codes of Practice.

Buyers who choose to contract NSI-approved companies can be assured of security and fire safety services delivered to the highest standards by businesses committed to excellence.

For more information visit www.nsi.org.uk

Observant Innovations

Observant’s PATROL Camera System is a vehicle-mounted 360o panoramic video camera. PATROL enables the visual documentation of everything occurring in the vicinity of a patrol or tasking, ensuring that nothing is missed.

The system captures all information in all directions, all of the time and has been built to withstand tough environmental and usage conditions.

Featuring 360° panoramic imagery, hi-res 14 Megapixel video and stills imagery as well as a rugged IP67 form factor, the PATROL Camera System provides a number of benefits including public reassurance, greater impartiality and improved dispute resolution.

Find out more by visiting www.observant-innovations.com

Also exhibiting will be Dallmeier Electronic UK and Thorn Security.

*For more information about the event, or to register for a delegate place, please visit www.bsia.co.uk/events.aspx

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ICO Blog: ‘An updated CCTV Code of Practice fit for 2014 and beyond’

Jonathan Bamford – head of strategic liaison at the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) – discusses the ICO’s updated CCTV Code of Practice and outlines why a revised Code is required to meet the demands of modern society.

It’s nearly five months since I last wrote about the importance of having a CCTV Code fit for the demands of modern society. At that time the draft version of the Code was out for consultation. Now, all of your comments have been considered and our updated CCTV guidance is available on the ICO’s website.

The updated CCTV Code is one that’s truly fit for the times in which we live. The days of CCTV being limited to a video camera on a pole are long gone. Our new Code reflects the latest advances in surveillance technologies and their implementation, while also explaining the key data protection issues that those operating the equipment need to understand.

So what’s changed? Well, in some respects it’s a case of ‘keep calm and carry on’. The fundamental principles that need to be followed remain the same. People must be informed about the information being collected about them with relevant use of privacy notices and signage where required. The information also needs to be kept secure so that it doesn’t fall into the wrong hands, and effective retention and disposal schedules must be in place to make sure information is only kept for as long as necessary before it’s securely destroyed.

The ICO has updated its CCTV Code of Practice

The ICO has updated its CCTV Code of Practice

However, the Code must reflect the times. The pace of technological change since our CCTV guidance was last updated in 2008 – let alone when it was first published some 14 years ago – has been considerable. These advances bring with them new opportunities and challenges for making sure the technology continues to be used in compliance with the Data Protection Act.

One common theme from the enforcement action we’ve taken in relation to the use of surveillance cameras is that there needs to be a thorough privacy impact assessment. This needs to be conducted before deploying these increasingly powerful and potentially intrusive technologies. The Code will help operators to stay on the right side of the law and save them from wasting money and resources on non-compliant systems.

New and emerging surveillance technologies

The new and emerging technologies section of the updated Code covers the key surveillance technologies that we believe will become increasingly popular in the years ahead.

A number of organisations are starting to use body-worn video. These small, inconspicuous devices can record both sound and images. This can mean that they are capable of being much more intrusive than traditional town centre CCTV. On that basis, their use needs to be well justified with safeguards put in place such as to ensure they are not used when they’re not needed. There must be strong security in case the devices fall into the wrong hands. The Code details specific guidance to help deal with the challenges of using these new devices.

The guidance also considers technologies that are not currently commonplace, but which may prove increasingly popular in future. Just last month, the Civil Aviation Authority released figures showing that over 300 companies have now been given permission to operate UAS (Unmanned Aerial Surveillance) in the UK. This figure has risen by a third within the last 12 months alone. Many of these devices can now be bought for a few hundred pounds and can record imagery. There’s important guidance on how they can be used by organisations to record personal information.

Recreational users are also encouraged to operate UAS responsibly. For example, recording should be restricted and only carried out in controlled areas where people are informed that monitoring may be taking place. It’s important that organisations understand these obligations at an early stage if they’re to remain on the right side of the law.

Jonathan Bamford: head of strategic liaison at the ICO

Jonathan Bamford: head of strategic liaison at the ICO

The updated CCTV Code also addresses long-standing issues where the consultation responses have shown that further clarification of the law is required. One such issue is the need for operators to comply with subject access requests. These requests are an important right enshrined in the Data Protection Act and allow individuals to request a record of any personal information that an organisation holds about them. This includes CCTV footage capturing their image.

However, these requests have been causing a great deal of confusion, particularly for smaller operators unaware of this area of the law. The new CCTV guide includes an expanded section explaining how these requests should be handled, when the information should be given out and details of the statutory deadline of 40 days by which time operators have to provide a full response.

Complementing the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice

We’ve designed our guidance to complement the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice published under the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. The Surveillance Camera Code’s ‘Guiding Principles’ apply to police forces, Police and Crime Commissioners and local authorities in England and Wales as described in the Act, and contain advice about recommended operational and technical standards that others may find useful.

The technology may change but the principles of the Data Protection Act remain the same. CCTV and other surveillance systems need to be proportionate, justifiable and secure in order to be compliant.

The updated ICO Code will help to make sure that this situation continues for the years ahead.

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