Tag Archives: Cash-in-Transit

Strong growth and improved operating margins reported by Loomis

Revenues at Loomis (the Cash-in-Transit and cash management specialist) for the third quarter increased to SEK 3,600 million (2,897). Organic growth was 3% (4) and real growth 18% (4).

Loomis’s operating income (EBITA)1 amounted to SEK 406 million (311). The operating margin was 11.3% (10.7).

Income before taxes stands at SEK 366 million (294) while income after taxes totals SEK 278 million (207).

Earnings per share before and after dilution amounted to SEK 3.70 (2.76).

Cash flow from operating activities was SEK 384 million (368), equivalent to 95% (119) of operating income (EBITA).

Strong growth and improved operating margins have been reported by Loomis, the cash management specialist

Strong growth and improved operating margins have been reported by Loomis, the cash management specialist

January-September 2014

Revenue for the first nine months is reported at SEK 9,796 million (8,436) and organic growth 4% (1). Real growth is 12% (2).

Loomis’ operating income (EBITA)1 amounted to SEK 981 million (805) while the operating margin increased to 10.0% (9.5).

Income before taxes is SEK 878 million (764). Income after taxes is reported to be SEK 651 million (539).

Earnings per share before dilution was SEK 8.65 (7.21) and SEK 8.65 (7.15) after dilution.

Cash flow from operating activities is SEK 782 million (637), equivalent to 80% (79) of operating income (EBITA).

Comment from the president and CEO

“I’m pleased to present another quarter with strong growth and continued margin improvement,” explained Jarl Dahlfors, Loomis’ president and CEO. “The quarter was characterised by the integration of VIA MAT and a sustained focus on continuous improvements at our branches. Growth is mainly attributable to the acquisition of VIA MAT, implementation of new contracts and strong growth in the USA.”

Dahlfors added: “The profitability improvement is primarily a result of the strong growth within Cash Management Services and Loomis SafePoint. Ongoing work designed to improve efficiencies is continuing to yield results.”

Working for major financial institutions, independent ATM deployers, major retailers, public sector bodies and a huge range of businesses, Loomis has a presence in 20 countries, operates 400 offices and employs more than 20,000 people generating annual sales of £1 billion.

The company offers intelligent safe and deposit systems, cash collection/Cash-in-Transit services, cash processing, coin delivery, ATM services (which include ATM replenishment, maintenance and administration) and specialist transport services.

Reference

1EBITA – Earnings Before Interest, Taxes and Amortisation of acquisition-related intangible fixed assets, acquisition-related costs and revenue and items affecting comparability

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Government commitment “crucial” in the continued fight against Cash-in-Transit crime

Despite attack levels reaching an all-time low in 2013, falling victim to violence and robbery remains a very real threat for the security sector’s dedicated Cash-in-Transit couriers. With interim reports for 2014 suggesting crime figures within this sector are in danger of rising, the British Security Industry Association (BSIA) plans to continue its work aimed at reducing the risks faced by couriers as they fulfil this essential public service.

Transporting around £500 billion every year – the equivalent to a staggering £1.4 billion every day, in fact – the UK’s Cash-in-Transit industry performs an essential public service, keeping cash moving around the country and supporting banks, retailers and businesses alike by facilitating millions of transactions on a daily basis.

However, the large amount of money and valuables involved renders Cash-in-Transit couriers particularly vulnerable to attempted robberies and often violent assaults.

In 2013, the number of attacks perpetrated on cash couriers reached a record low, with just 270 attacks taking place. That figure is 30% less than in 2012, in fact, and represents an impressive 75% decrease on the all-time high of 1,060 attacks recorded back in 2009. Despite this reduction, though, couriers remain vulnerable to attack, particularly when carrying cash across the pavement from their secure vehicle to the client’s premises.

Serious injury remains a very real threat. Overall injury rates have decreased since 2012, but almost a quarter of attacks in 2013 (24%) resulted in some kind of physical harm being done to the couriers involved. In addition, the proportion of attacks where firearms were used (or their use was intimated) rose from 10% in 2012 to 14% in 2013.

The Government's ongoing commitment will be crucial in the fight against Cash-in-Transit crime

The Government’s ongoing commitment will be crucial in the fight against Cash-in-Transit crime

Partnership approach involving Government and the police service

Reducing the risks faced by cash couriers remains a key focus of the partnership approach taken by the private security industry – in conjunction with the Home Office and police forces across the country – to tackle Cash-in-Transit crime. With 2014’s figures indicating some slight month-on-month rises in the number of attacks carried out on cash couriers, the commitment of all stakeholders to the continuation of this partnership approach has arguably never been more important.

Steve Hurst, the head of SaferCash, commented: “For couriers going about their daily duties these attack figures can never be far from their minds. It’s for this very reason that we as an industry, along with our colleagues in Government and police forces across the country, cannot afford to rest on our laurels.”

Established in 2007, SaferCash is a security initiative which aims to reduce the number of attacks on cash couriers through the effective sharing of intelligence between members of the Cash-in-Transit industry and police forces nationwide. Operated by the BSIA, SaferCash provides a national framework for information and intelligence sharing between individual police forces and operational security personnel, while also affording essential and immediate support for Cash-in-Transit crew members who may have witnessed a suspicious incident or activity.

Establishing a partnership between industry and the police service has given SaferCash the ability to identify linked offences and spot where organised crime groups are active across force boundaries. In the case of Cash-in-Transit, these groups are operating on an increasingly nationwide basis, impacting on local communities and often using the proceeds of their crimes to fund other criminal enterprises such as drug dealing or human trafficking.

Keeping couriers safe is the key objective of SaferCash. With most robberies and attacks on couriers taking place as they cross the pavement, it’s essential to minimise the distance couriers have to travel between the secure vehicle and the delivery premises. This means that many vehicles are forced to park illegally in order to make safe deliveries.

Couriers remain vulnerable to attack, particularly when carrying cash across the pavement from the secure vehicle to their client’s premises

Couriers remain vulnerable to attack, particularly when carrying cash across the pavement from the secure vehicle to their client’s premises

The impact of robberies in the Cash-in-Transit sector is most keenly felt by those who suffer directly as a result of attacks. It’s the protection of victims and the prevention of future attacks which most vehemently demonstrates the need for all stakeholders to remain committed to reducing the level of Cash-in-Transit crime.

For more information about the BSIA’s Cash and Valuables in Transit Section visit: http://www.bsia.co.uk/cash-and-valuables-in-transit

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BSIA membership wins 2014 Infologue.com Building The Future Award

The British Security Industry Association’s membership has triumphed in this year’s Infologue.com-Risk UK Building The Future Award, which was presented at London’s Hilton Hotel, Park Lane on Wednesday 16 July.

Back in 2003, Interconnective Ltd (publisher of the security and counter-terrorism focused news and opinion portal http://www.infologue.com) devised and sponsored the inaugural Building The Future Award.

On an annual basis, this accolade is bestowed upon the individual or organisation deemed by previous winners still active in the security world to have used the previous 12-month period in creating a major footprint – a major footprint on the road towards the realisation of a vibrant, professional and profitable security services sector for the UK.

In 2014, the winner is the British Security Industry Association’s (BSIA) membership, who ably and actively support the Trade Association that does so much to benefit the security sector by way of standards and Code of Practice development as well as political lobbying and continually helping to influence the road map for private sector regulation.

Speaking on stage at this year’s award presentation, which took place at the BSIA’s own Annual Luncheon and Security Personnel Awards Ceremony, Interconnective Ltd’s managing director Bobby Logue explained: “The key reason why the BSIA’s members have been selected to receive this year’s award is due to their invaluable contribution towards the Trade Association’s cohesive strategic direction. Members of the BSIA’s individual sections decided on their individual strategies and, at the same time, actively embraced a set of corporate goals led and championed by outgoing BSIA chairman Geoff Zeidler.”

Left to Right: Bobby Logue (md, Interconnective), Geoff Zeidler (GZC Consultants), Julie Kenny CBE DL (chairman, Pyronix), Tim Geddes, BSIA chairman Pauline Norstrom and Brian Sims Hon FSyI, Editor of Risk UK

Left to Right: Bobby Logue (md, Interconnective), Geoff Zeidler (GZC Consultants), Julie Kenny CBE DL (chairman, Pyronix), Tim Geddes, BSIA chairman Pauline Norstrom and Brian Sims Hon FSyI, Editor of Risk UK

Logue continued: “As a result of the changes introduced, as an organisation the BSIA has become far more member-centric. There is now much greater participation in the Trade Association by its smaller members. This has been evidenced this year, in fact, by the number of smaller security companies putting forward submissions for the annual Security Personnel Awards. In the late 1990s I accused the BSIA of perhaps being a ‘Big Boys’ Club’. In my opinion that’s no longer the case.”

Reasons behind the decision

Logue went on to outline several other pivotal reasons why the BSIA membership has triumphed in 2014. They include the following:

• Reducing the impact on security personnel from Cash-in-Transit attacks (the number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers reached a record low last year, with just 270 attacks taking place and representing a 30% decrease when compared to 2012, in addition to an impressive 75% decrease on the all-time high figure of 1060 attacks recorded in 2009)
• Nominating 22 experts to European Standards Working Groups (for example, due to the input and dedication of a number of BSIA members, the European suite of standards focused around intruder alarm systems is progressing towards completion within a few years)
• Providing a clear mandate in support of the Security Industry Authority’s ongoing business licensing proposals
• Influencing the development of standards for Alarm Receiving Centres

Commenting on the BSIA membership’s success, Risk UK’s Editor Brian Sims Hon FSyI – who presented this year’s trophy in tandem with Bobby Logue – explained: “The BSIA has done so much in support of the security sector and the profession of security in general. On that basis alone, this recognition is just reward for the section members who absolutely underpin the fabulous work carried out by the dedicated BSIA team at Head Office.”

Sims continued: “In the guarding world, BSIA member companies have campaigned tirelessly on regulatory issues, while at all times their members of staff perform outstanding acts of bravery and exhibit Best Practice on behalf of client organisations. Similarly, BSIA members involved with systems development have played a crucial role in helping to formulate new standards and Codes of Practice. Without their efforts, it’s fair to put forward the notion that the security sector simply wouldn’t progress.”

Back in April, for example, an important Code of Practice for the CCTV sector was revised by the BSIA in order to reflect the very latest in surveillance camera installation standards.

The Code of Practice – relating to the planning, design, installation and operation of CCTV systems – was first published in the early 1990s. With so much change currently affecting the CCTV sector, including newly-created IEC and Cenelec standards, this latest revision was undertaken to reflect current installation practices and bring together all requirements from across the standards landscape.

The landscape of CCTV standards is indeed complex and can be difficult to navigate, so this Code of Practice (alongside its associated guidance) is intended to provide a single point of information for security installers wishing to provide a quality service compliant to legislative requirements.

The revised version of the Code of Practice has also been harmonised with the Government’s own CCTV Code of Practice, absorbing the 12 principles laid out by the Surveillance Camera Commissioner and thus enabling interested parties to readily see where the Government’s requirements are reflected in the Code.

Previous winners of the Building The Future Award

Previous winners of the prestigious Building The Future Award – which is orchestrated by Bobby Logue, supported by Risk UK and, in 2014, celebrates its tenth anniversary – have included David Dickinson (BSIA), Stuart Lowden (Wilson James), Baroness Ruth Henig CBE (former chairman of the Security Industry Authority) and Skills for Security.

In 2010, a posthumous award was made to Jǿrgen Philip-Sǿrensen CBE MA (JPS) – a man recognised as the founding father of the security world.

In 2012, DAC Janet Williams QPM (then of the Metropolitan Police Service) deservedly won the trophy. Janet’s tremendous work in helping to realise a more effective communications and working relationship between the police service and the private security sector were duly noted and honoured.

Last year, The Security Institute won the trophy for developing and managing the ground-breaking Register of Chartered Security Professionals in partnership with The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals.

Other reasons for The Security Institute’s success included:
• Provision of accredited and award-winning Certificate and Diploma courses in Security Management at Levels 3 and 5 respectively
• Creating and presenting its own annual awards – the Wilf Knight Award and the George Van Schalkwyk Award for academic excellence
• Publishing a series of Good Practice Guides for security professionals

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Cash-in-Transit attacks reach all-time low but threat of violence remains

Despite attack levels reaching an all-time low in 2013, falling victim to attack and robbery remains a very real threat for the security industry’s Cash-in-Transit couriers according to the latest statistics published by SaferCash (the Cash-in-Transit intelligence service of the British Security Industry Association).

Transporting around £500 billion every year – the equivalent to £1.4 billion every day – the UK’s Cash-in-Transit industry performs an essential public service, keeping cash moving around the country and in turn supporting banks, retailers and businesses by facilitating millions of transactions every day.

The number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers reached a record low last year, with just 270 attacks taking place. This represents a 30% decrease when compared to 2012, and an impressive 75% decrease on the all-time high figure of 1,060 attacks in 2009.

The number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers reached a record low last year, with just 270 attacks taking place

The number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers reached a record low last year, with just 270 attacks taking place

James Kelly, CEO of the British Security Industry Association (BSIA), commented: “These consistent year-on-year successes are testament to the continued joint efforts of industry, Government and the Police in tackling this serious and violent crime. However, it’s the violent nature of this crime – and its significant impact on victims – that’s the driving force behind all stakeholders’ efforts to reduce both the number and impact of Cash-in-Transit attacks. The statistics contained in this latest report highlight the vital importance of all stakeholders’ continued commitment to this cause.”

Risk of violence

Looking closer at the risk of violence faced by couriers, it’s clear that – despite an overall reduction in the number of attacks – serious injury is still a very real threat to couriers.

While overall injury rates have decreased since 2012, almost a quarter of attacks in 2013 (24%) resulted in some kind of injury, while the proportion of attacks where firearms were used or intimated has risen from 10% in 2012 to 14% in 2013.

Steve Hurst, head of SaferCash, explained: “For couriers going about their daily duties, these figures can never be far from their minds. It’s for this reason that we as an industry, along with our colleagues in Government and police forces across the country, cannot afford to rest on our laurels.”

Established in 2007, SaferCash is a security initiative which aims to reduce the number of attacks on Cash-in-Transit couriers through the effective sharing of intelligence between the industry and police forces nationwide.

Operated by the BSIA, SaferCash provides a national framework for information and intelligence sharing between individual police forces and security personnel, while also providing essential and immediate support for Cash-in-Transit crews who witness a suspicious incident.

Building a partnership between industry and the police has afforded SaferCash the ability to identify linked offences and spot where organised crime groups (OCGs) are active across force boundaries. In the case of Cash-in-Transit, these groups are operating on an increasingly nationwide basis, impacting on local communities and often using the proceeds of their crime to fund other criminal enterprises such as drugs or human trafficking.

Continued commitment to the cause

Despite the contribution of Cash-in-Transit crime to the wider criminal network, the impact of robbery is most keenly felt by those who suffer directly as a results of the attack. It’s the protection of victims and prevention of future attacks which remain the driving forces behind all stakeholders’ continued commitment to reducing the level of Cash-in-Transit crime.

James Kelly: CEO at the BSIA

James Kelly: CEO at the BSIA

James Kelly concluded: “Often, couriers suffer extreme and unforgettable violence. They demonstrate admirable bravery in delivering this essential public service. My thoughts remain with all of the couriers who suffered attacks last year. Preventing others from experiencing the same physical and psychological harm is the driving force behind our ongoing commitment to reducing Cash-in-Transit crime even further in 2014.”

For more information about the BSIA and SaferCash visit: http://www.bsia.co.uk/cash-in-transit

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Banknote Watch seminar programme and exhibition draws impressive police attendance

Police officers from across the country were given the chance to get close to the latest technology used in fighting Cash-in-Transit crime at a new event organised by crime reduction partnership Banknote Watch.

Attracting over 180 delegates from across 11 police forces, the seminar and exhibition brought police together with manufacturers of the unique taggant technology used to trace stolen banknotes back to the scene of a crime. A series of presentations gave police officers up-to-the-minute information about the applications of this technology and the procedures they can follow to identify and trace stolen cash.

Banknote Watch is a crime reduction partnership aimed at raising awareness among police and the general public that ‘a stained note is probably a stolen note’. Its supporters work closely with the police, financial institutions and the private security industry to ensure that criminals are less and less likely to profit from Cash-in-Transit crime.

Hosting the event alongside West Midlands Police and ACPO Secured by Design, Banknote Watch invited several exhibitors along to enable delegates from police forces to learn of the unique taggant technology used to trace stolen notes back to the scene of a crime.

Vital supporting evidence

Hilaire O’Shea is the national co-ordinator for Banknote Watch.

“When the police find stained banknotes,” explained O’Shea, “unique taggant technology can help them quickly and easily trace such notes back to the scene of a specific crime, which can in turn help them track down vital supporting evidence to help secure a conviction.”

O’Shea continued: “Each taggant has its own unique chemical code which shows up under ultraviolet light. This can attach itself to a criminal’s clothes or skin, or the inside of a car or home in which the stolen notes are stored. These solutions can remain traceable for years.”

On that basis, O’Shea and her colleagues at Banknote Watch wanted police officers to leave this event able to recognise the various solutions and understand the procedure they can follow to secure the evidence they need.

“Banknote Watch plays an important role in bringing police together with the manufacturers of these solutions,” added O’Shea, “as well as monitoring the positive impact this technology has on crime trends and reducing the risks faced by Cash-in-Transit couriers and financial institutions. We’re delighted that the event was so well-attended, and hope to follow up with similar events across the country and so help spread the word about unique taggants as far and wide as we can.”

Commitment, dedication and support from the security sector

Welcoming delegates to the event, ACC Gareth Cann of West Midlands Police said: “I have been hugely impressed with the commitment, dedication, support and effort from the [security] industry generally. Joint working and joint effort has been to everyone’s benefit.”

Meanwhile, Sergeant Andy Gregory of West Midlands Police Force’s Crime Reduction Unit, which hosted the event at its Tally Ho Training Centre in Birmingham, commented that the day had provided an “opportunity to share information with 11 police forces from around the country and across the region.”

Geoff Knupfer of exhibiting company Smartwater Technology (and current chairman of the Asset and Property Marking Section of the British Security Industry Association) added: “It has been a great conference. We’re absolutely delighted at the turnout and the interest being shown in some of the technology that’s available for countering and combating ATM attacks and cash attacks generally.”

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