Tag Archives: Building Research Establishment

ASSA ABLOY Security Doors hosts BRE security testing day

ASSA ABLOY Security Doors, a UK division of ASSA ABLOY, has delivered a successful security testing day in partnership with the Building Research Establishment (BRE). Held at the ASSA ABLOY Security Doors factory in Lisburn, Northern Ireland, the day saw an excellent turn-out of security professionals who witnessed various methods of attack on both steel and timber doorsets.

The event consisted of an overview of the LPS 1175 test standard, a comprehensive factory tour and a practical demonstration that showed the difference between certified and non-certified security doors.

AASDBRETestingDay

Ian Broadley, business development manager for ASSA ABLOY Security Doors, said: “We hosted this event to help illustrate the difference between investing in a certificated product versus a product that may look similar visually, but can be compromised very easily when put to the test. A test rig was set up at our factory, housing two steel doors and two timber doors. The BRE team used various methods of attack to demonstrate how they were able to defeat the doors that were not built to meet LPS 1175 test standards.”

Broadley added: “We received a great deal of positive feedback from attendees, who included security consultants, end users, members of the police and Government personnel. Attendees commented on how thought-provoking it was to witness just how quickly non-certified doors could be compromised.”

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Zaun develops SR3 fencing for Critical National Infrastructure applications

A high-security fence for rail and other Critical National Infrastructure (CNI) applications that resists sustained attack with specialist power tools for more than five minutes has been developed by steel mesh fencing manufacturer Zaun.

Zaun has received a revised Certificate of Product Approval from the Loss Prevention Certification Board to include its brand new CorruSec SR3 approved to Security Rating 3. The fencing system incorporates corrugated HiSec 3-5-10 mesh sandwiched between further panels of HiSec 3-5-10, a special welded steel wire fence panel similar to the type of mesh usually used for prison fencing, whose name is derived from its mesh size: 3″ × 0.5″ × 10 gauge.

The original concept was the idea of Zaun co-founder and director Alastair Henman and has been developed by R&D manager Adam Christie. Christie explained: “Alastair conceived the design by looking at the construction of cardboard, in particular the corrugated kind and how the corrugated element created a much stronger three-dimensional material. We started experimenting with a corrugated mesh centre section to give fencing greater rigidity and increase its thickness without adding much to the material content and weight in order to counter the kind of tools attackers might use.”

ZaunSR3Fencing

CorruSec SR3 has been subjected to sustained attack by testers from the Building Research Establishment wielding a range of hand and power tools, yet they couldn’t breach the CorruSec SR3 in less than five minutes.

The fencing system is manufactured to BS 1722 Part 14 and is approved at heights from 2.4 metres to 6 metres above the ground, in ground or base-plated options.

Each individual panel features a 76.2 mm x 12.7 mm mesh configuration with 3 mm horizontal and vertical wires. The corrugated section is pressed to approximately 100 mm in depth. All three layers are bolted together using bolts fixed into place in a grid pattern throughout the combined fence panel.

CorruSec SR3 provides good through visibility for use with CCTV cameras, while security toppings can be added to suit.

Alastair Henman explained: “The current specification for CrossRail stations is a ‘5-minute fence’, so we set about seeing if we could create a viable product. Across our customer base, operators of CNI are upgrading their most sensitive sites given  the heightened fear of terrorist threats and advances in technology.”

As well as rail applications, SR3 fencing is ideal for protecting assets at water utilities, oil and gas compounds, Data Centres and other CNI sites.

 

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EUSAS-Euralarm Fire Safety Conference focuses on R&D and standardisation

The results of cutting-edge research on fire safety were presented during a joint conference of EUSAS and Euralarm, the European research and Trade Associations in the sector. R&D’s potential impact on current and future standardisation work was a further point of focus for the event.

The joint EUSAS-Euralarm Conference took place on February 7-8 at the Berlin offices of Bosch Security Systems and determined to discover how cutting-edge innovation in the fire safety sector will drive the development of future standards and make buildings and people safer than they have ever been.

The event brought together 60 top specialists in the field of fire safety research, engineering and standardisation representing various European countries. Introducing the event were EUSAS chairman Professor Dr Andreas Czylwik, Euralarm president Enzo Peduzzi and, on behalf of the event’s host, Christoph Hampe.

The programme was divided into four sessions: false alarms, performance and quality testing, evacuation systems and fire safety in smart buildings.

As yet unpublished research on false alarms data gathered in Germany, Great Britain, Switzerland and Sweden was presented by Dr Sebastian Festag from ZVEI, the German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers’ Association, and Lance Rütimann from SES, the Swiss Association of Security Product Manufacturers. Both are Euralarm delegates in the Task Group on False Alarms and have derived a common approach to an empirical analysis of false alarm data.

Wolfgang Krüll from the University of Duisburg-Essen presented reproducible testing procedures for false alarms and three new testing devices which have been developed for those procedures. In parallel, statistics from Iceland were presented by Gudmundur Gunnarsson of the MVS Iceland Construction Authority.

The problem of testing a safety device’s performance over its whole lifetime was first presented by Thomas Litterst of Hekatron, including detail of a specific testing process he has developed. As demonstrated by Thorsten Schultze from the University of Duisburg-Essen, products currently on the market are largely compliant with current standard’s requirements on age limits and could potentially function correctly well beyond.

eusaseuralarmconference2017

Raman Chagger from the Building Research Establishment in England also showed that optical smoke detectors developed in the 1980s function perfectly in modern environments.

Another matter is the mechanism of drift compensation, making up for the aging of a device and the build-up of dirt on sensors, which has the potential to delay the detection of slowly developing fires. That’s according to Florence Daniault from the Wagner Group.

Evacuation systems was the third topic. It was discussed by Dr Karl Fridolf from WSP, an engineering services group, who exposed the theoretical framework of human behaviour in situations of fire, and how behavioural aspects could be better considered in safety design.

Video fire detection and its influence on evacuation was presented by Dr Tjark Windisch from Bosch Security Systems. On the day, Dr Windisch called for greater efforts when it comes to standardising video fire detection.

The final topic, smart buildings, was first discussed by Raman Chagger from the perspective of visual alarm devices. He demonstrated how the product standard together with suitable guidelines in a code of practice needs to be based on more solid research.

Dr Peter Harris from United Technologies Corporation showed how favouring interoperability and data sharing in smart buildings could bring about ‘context-aware smoke detection’.

In a final presentation, Marc Chenevoy from Euralarm highlighted the difficulties inherent with standardising interoperable systems in smart buildings, but reported on positive progress being made within European standardisation bodies.

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BRE schedules Workshop to explore reduction of false fire alarms

Across the past 12 months, the Building Research Establishment (BRE) has been working with the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service to investigate the underlying causes of false fire alarms. The live investigations of false fire alarms research work is now complete and a briefing paper detailing the findings is available from www.bre.co.uk/firedetectionresearch.

The work has identified 35 recommendations for nine Stakeholder Groups that could lead towards a reduction in UK false alarms.

With the support of the Fire Industry Association and BAFE, the BRE is now scheduled to host a Workshop aimed at promoting the study’s findings, and is inviting key individuals that will adopt the recommendations from the Briefing Paper and reduce false alarms in their sector.

The Workshop is being held at the BRE’s Watford site on Monday 8 February. The overriding aim is to discuss and develop actionable methods for implementing the research findings as quickly as possible.

“Over the past ten years we’ve seen a reduction in false alarms,” stated Raman Chagger, principal consultant in fire detection at the BRE. “However, this is starting to plateau. The Workshop is aimed at reducing the more difficult false alarm causes.”

*For further detail send an e-mail to: conferences@bre.co.uk

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PEL Services awarded three-year fire alarm maintenance contract by BRE

Commercial fire, security and communication systems provider PEL Services has been awarded a three-year, fully comprehensive contract for fire alarm service and maintenance at the Building Research Establishment (BRE) headquarters in Watford.

The BRE is a world-leading, multi-disciplinary building science centre with a mission to improve buildings through research and knowledge generation. In fact, the BRE has been making a positive difference in the built environment since 1921.

Richard Tattersall, estates compliance manager at the BRE, told Risk UK: “We had been working with a single fire alarm supplier for 15 years and were looking for a more comprehensive agreement. PEL Services was successful in the tender process. PEL is flexible when it comes to meeting our needs and we have been very happy with the company’s service.”

The Building Research Establishment's headquarters in Hertfordshire

The Building Research Establishment’s headquarters in Hertfordshire

For PEL, the awarding of this contract validates the business’ commitment to providing high quality service and products that meet the most demanding of standards, among them LPS1014.

Conventional and addressable fire alarm systems

PEL is now responsible for maintaining both the conventional and addressable fire alarm systems covering 1,500 devices across 33 buildings at BRE’s site in Garston near Watford, Hertfordshire. This includes systems protecting BRE’s Innovation Park, home to some of the world’s most sustainable buildings.

In addition to maintaining the fire alarm system, PEL has now achieved Approved Contractor status to BRE and has been working on the design, installation and commissioning of new or re-modelled fire detection and alarm systems.

PEL Services operates throughout the UK and overseas, supporting markets as diverse as local authorities, public utilities, finance, healthcare, education and retail. In addition to fully comprehensive maintenance schedules, PEL Services designs, supplies, installs and commissions sound, fire, security and communications systems.

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BAFE supports Scottish Fire and Rescue Service research on causes of false fire alarms

A multi-agency partnership is set to study the causes of false alarms from fire alarm systems in buildings and their frequency of occurrence which will result in proposed solutions being developed to prevent recurrences in the future.

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service is teaming up with partners from the Association of British Insurers (ABI), British Approvals for Fire Equipment (BAFE), the Building Research Establishment (BRE), the CBRE Group, CS Todd & Associates, the Fire Industry Association (FIA) and Glasgow City Council to undertake this groundbreaking research.

Due to the universal nature of fire alarm systems, the outcomes of this work will have the potential to impact within the UK and across Europe, including the possibility of influencing future standards and Codes of Practice in respect of automatic fire alarm systems.

Fire-fighters throughout the UK are frequently called to attend incidents resulting from false alarms generated by fire detection and suppression systems usually installed within commercial premises and often monitored remotely. The cost of these unwanted false alarm signals to both businesses and Fire and Rescue Services is estimated to be around £1 billion per annum.

Assistant Chief Officer (ACO) Lewis Ramsay, director of prevention and protection at the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, said: “Unwanted false alarm signals are a significant issue for Fire and Rescue Services so it’s important we join with our partners to see them reduced. The scale of the problem is clear. Over the past three years Scotland’s fire-fighters have been called to in excess of 100,000 such incidents, which equates to over 40% of all the incidents we attend. Not only is there a substantial financial cost attached to this but attending needless incidents also means fire-fighters and resources are taken away from their communities.”

Ramsay outlined: “In a real emergency every second counts. The time taken for fire-fighters to travel to a house fire, a road traffic collision or any other incident can be absolutely crucial when it comes to saving the lives of people in danger. By working together with our partners we can gather information on the common causes of false alarms and identify approaches to reduce the number that occur.”

Each unwanted false alarm signal costs businesses around £2,900 with an estimated £300 burden also falling on the Fire and Rescue Service.

A multi-agency partnership is to study the causes of false alarms from fire alarm systems in buildings and their frequency of occurrence

A multi-agency partnership is to study the causes of false alarms from fire alarm systems in buildings and their frequency of occurrence

Benefits of automatic fire alarm systems

As well as researching false alarms, the project will also promote the benefits of having automatic fire alarm systems installed in buildings. This will be done by studying fires where systems have detected them and raised the alarm. Such occurrences will be used to highlight the benefits of automatic fire alarm systems in alerting people to safely evacuate buildings and summoning assistance from the Fire and Rescue Service such that fires can be tackled in their early stages, thereby reducing the damage caused.

The project will involve two Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Watch Managers seconded from Glasgow’s group of Fire Safety Enforcement Officers who will work alongside a fire alarm industry expert to gather live intelligence on incidents that involve the actuation of fire alarm systems. In this regard the project is unique, as previous studies have involved the use of historical data.

Glasgow was chosen as the focus area for the project as the city is considered to be geographically suitable and has a sufficient number of incidents to enable data to be captured relatively quickly.

ACO Ramsay continued: “This is a joint project overseen by an executive sub-group of the Business Engagement Forum, bringing us together with Glasgow City Council and other partners including representatives from the insurance and fire protection industries. Our designated officers and the researcher will attend incidents in the city to gather data and gain an accurate understanding of false alarm causes which is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent recurrences. Where appropriate, the team will also attend incidents where fire alarms have detected an actual fire. This will enhance the understanding of potential consequences had the alarm system not been in place, in turn demonstrating where such systems do provide value.”

When the team has completed its research a formal report will be produced by the Business Engagement Forum sub-group. It’s expected to include recommendations useful to businesses, the fire protection industry, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service and other Fire and Rescue Services as they develop practical measures to reduce the problem caused by unwanted false alarm signals.

ACO Ramsay added: “The project involves the same partnership that helped develop the new Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Unwanted False Alarm Signals Policy which will replace the eight different policies used by the antecedent services. Under this single nationwide approach, fire-fighters across Scotland will engage with duty holders and advocate a multi-stage action plan in response to the actuation of a fire alarm system.”

The cost of unwanted false fire alarm signals to both businesses and Fire and Rescue Services is estimated to be around £1 billion per year

The cost of unwanted false fire alarm signals to both businesses and Fire and Rescue Services is estimated to be around £1 billion per year

Ramsay asserted: “Cutting the number of unwanted false alarm signal incidents will reduce financial costs to ourselves and businesses, and also cut the demand placed on a community’s fire and rescue resources. One clear and immediate benefit will be to reduce the number of times our appliances have to travel under blue lights, which will lower the risk to our crews and other road users. We want to build on this work, and the research project will help Fire and Rescue Services and businesses to tackle the issue.”

Main objectives to be addressed

There’s no fixed timescale for the research to be completed, although it’s anticipated that the project may take around a year to produce a report.

The main objectives are:
• The collation of comprehensive data in relation to unwanted false alarm signal incidents
• Identification of the common causes of unwanted false alarm signal incidents, including appropriate classification
• Improved engagement between the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, the fire industry and businesses in relation to unwanted false alarm signal incidents
• A reduction in the volume of unwanted false alarm signal incidents within the Glasgow city area
• Provision of intelligence to help reduce the volume of unwanted false alarm signal incidents across Scotland

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service’s Unwanted Fire Alarm Signal Policy ‘go live’ date was 1 December 2014. It replaces existing policies which varied between the eight Fire and Rescue Services that operated in Scotland prior to April 2013.

A previous study undertaken by the BRE entitled: ‘The Causes of False Fire Alarms in Buildings’ is available at: http://www.bre.co.uk/podpage.jsp?id=1752

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