Tag Archives: Big Data

Qognify and Bosch expand co-operation to deliver “new level” of interoperable security solutions

Qognify, the specialist in Big Data solutions for physical security and operations, has expanded the integration of Bosch network video security cameras and Qognify’s Situator and VisionHub, in turn providing customers with advanced technology and business benefits.

This ‘Best of Breed’ solution creates centralised management for the entire platform with direct integration of Bosch cameras to Situator (Situation Management/PSIM) and VisionHub (Video Management System).

The integration enhances security management and operational benefits by leveraging situation management, video and visualisation capabilities:

*Centralised control and management through Situator Direct integration between Bosch’s network video security cameras and Situator. The integration enables PTZ and PTZ-like control for moving and fixed cameras, automatic triggering of processes when pre-defined incidents occur based on pre-defined alarm rules using cameras’ built-in video analytics, playback via local camera storage and camera tampering detection.

*Advanced video management capabilities via Qognify VisionHub including de-warping The advanced integration of Bosch’s FLEXIDOME IP panoramic 7000 camera and Qognify’s VMS eliminates fish eye lens distortion, enabling 360° of view without blind spots and with an non-distorted overview image. Additionally, the PTZ-like control of the video allows end users to digitally pan, tilt and zoom in order to focus on details without losing the bigger picture. This advance support of de-warping means empowering the benefit from wide coverage using a single device, while having a “normal” view of an otherwise distorted or reversed image.

QognifyVisionHub

Qognify records the original camera stream and de-warps the video for viewing purposes, allowing each operator a unique view.

*Reduced storage and network bandwidth with VisionHubBosch Intelligent Dynamic Noise Reduction: A feature that optimises storage capacity and reduces network strain by using bandwidth only when needed. By intelligently distinguishing between noise and relevant information, Intelligent Dynamic Noise Reduction reduces the camera’s bitrate by up to 50%, substantially contributing to a lower total cost of ownership.

*Network optimisation: Overcoming network overload during working hours by automated, scheduled transfer from the camera’s on-board storage to central control.

*Zero loss of data: Automatic filling of missing recording data on the SVR by restoring missing video from the camera’s on-board storage.

*Video Analytics at the Edge: Qognify’s VisionHub integrates with Bosch’s Essential Video Analytics or Intelligent Video Analytics which runs on the camera. This enables the delivery of video analytics alarms based on pre-definable alarm rules from the camera to VisionHub and Situator. In addition, the integration supports the Qognify video analytics suite running centrally on the recorder, combining Bosch built-in (edge) video analytics with Qognify’s server-based video analytics. This offers customers maximum flexibility when designing a video analytics solution.

“When mission-critical solutions are involved, it’s essential that stringent quality checks are observed,” said Rudolf Spielberger, head of the Integration Partner Programme at Bosch Security Systems. “Qognify’s solutions were tested to excel in multiple integrations. Our strategic co-operation with Qognify is substantially enhancing levels of security and delivering clear and quantifiable business advantages for our customers.”

Certified integration is already in use at customers’ sites. “We’re committed to advancing integration with leading technology partners and, to this end, we’re proud of our integration with Bosch to yield a complete, tested and field-proven solution,” said Eran Noam, vice-president of global strategic partnerships at Qognify. “It’s important that organisations have confidence in integrations such that they can leverage the broad range of excellent integrated products available in today’s security marketplace.”

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Qognify expands global R&D Centre in Israel

Qognify, the specialist in Big Data solutions for physical security and operations, has expanded its global development centre with the opening of new offices in Israel’s premier industrial area of Ra’anana. 

Qognify develops smart security systems that enable organisations to optimise response, mitigate risks, reduce business exposure and improve performance. The company’s corporate headquarters are located in New York and it operates sales and service offices in Europe, Singapore and India. The Israeli operation is Qognify’s development centre in which most of the employees are engineers and developers, with plans to expand investment in R&D throughout 2017 and 2018.

QognifyIsrael

Moti Shabtai, CEO and president of Qognify, explained: “Today, the need for safety and security systems is an axiom. Organisations, companies and countries with an advanced realisation of this need take it to the next level by leveraging the information collected by these systems for streamlining operations and improving services.”

Qognify’s’ customers include major airports, seaports, public transportation and infrastructure companies, financial institutions, smart cities and commercial entities.

“Naturally, the ability to serve such customers and provide them with complex and advanced solutions is made possible by tremendous investment in technology,” continued Shabtai. “Our new offices are designed to support the needs of the development environment with advanced infrastructure and optimal connectivity to the company’s offices around the world.”

Shabtai added: “No less important is the state-of-the-art work environment in which our engineers and developers, project managers, product and service personnel and other units operating from Israel will receive the inspiration they need to continue to produce technological excellence.”

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Qognify opens new corporate headquarters in New York

Qognify, the specialist in Big Data solutions for physical security and operations, has announced the opening of its new corporate headquarters in Pearl River, New York.

Located in the Blue Hill Plaza complex, the new expanded headquarters is home to corporate management functions and the regional sales team, enabling better support to customers and partners alike.

Just 20 miles outside of Manhattan, Pearl River in Rockland County is strategically located with convenient access to both New York and New Jersey. Customers and partners will be able to visualise Qognify’s state-of-the-art situation management platform Situator 8.0 with its Operational Intelligence CenterVisionHub, the new intelligent IP video surveillance and security management system, and Qognify’s next generation real-time video analytics solution Suspect Search.

bluehillplaza

Blue Hill Plaza

The Blue Hill Plaza was designed with powerful redundancy to support critical organisations such as the once bustling NYNEX Stock Exchange. This was proven during Super Storm Sandy, as it was one of the few buildings in the area that didn’t lose its power supply. This makes it an ideal location to host customers and partners for demo and training purposes.

“With a close proximity to metropolitan New York and its airport network, our new location offers ideal access to customers and partners from the US and around the world,” explained Moti Shabtai, president of Qognify. “In this new location, we will have access to top talent to further grow our business in the Americas and also oversee the company’s global operation.”

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Qognify’s Situator 8.0 chosen as finalist for Benchmark Innovation Awards 2016

Qognify Situator 8.0 has been selected as a finalist in the Site Protection Software category of the Benchmark Innovation Awards 2016. These annual awards recognise and reward innovative thinking and the delivery of benefits through advanced security solutions.

Launched by Qognify in February this year, Situator 8.0 adds actionable intelligence capabilities to the Situation Management platform with its new Operational Intelligence Center (OIC) module.

OIC helps organisations better leverage the Big Data flowing into their security and operational Control Centres. It constantly monitors data captured by Situator 8.0 and other systems and sources.

QognifyMVP

The OIC features an advanced rule engine and business intelligence visualisation tools which build on Situator’s advanced situation management capabilities, correlation engine and Standard Operating Procedures, in turn yielding an enterprise-wide view of business performance against the host organisation’s own KPIs through the prisms of current business status, its trending performance as well as predictive view.

Moti Shabtai, president of Qognify, commented: “We’re proud that the innovation we have brought to market within Situator 8.0 and particularly the OIC has been recognised by the Benchmark Innovation Awards and Benchmark Magazine. Through Situator 8.0 and the OIC, we’re taking situational awareness to the next level.”

MotiShabtaiQognify

Moti Shabtai

Shabtai added: “Actionable Intelligence is about delivering insight on what’s happening or unfolding, together with critical ‘what to do next’ guidance. Relying on smart trend analysis, organisations will be able not only to handle incidents in the most effective manner, but also to be more proactive, anticipate events and align performance with business objectives.”

*The winners of the Benchmark Innovation Awards will be announced by Risk UK’s sister title Benchmark Magazine in July

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‘A Manifesto for Professional Security’: The Security Institute’s ‘Vision of The Future’

On Tuesday 18 November at The Churchill War Rooms in central London, The Security Institute launched ‘A Manifesto for Professional Security’. The Keynote Speech was delivered by Emma Shaw CSyP, the Institute’s chairman, who duly outlined the organisation’s vision for making professional security more effective: a profession that’s recognised and respected for the immense value it delivers to society, to organisations in both the public and private sector and, indeed, individual members of the public.

Everything The Security Institute has done over the first 15 years of its existence has been building up to this point. We would like to think that our new document entitled: ‘Recognised, Respected and Professional: A Manifesto for Professional Security’ carries on the tradition of The Security Institute’s founding members. Back in 1999, those founding members were willing to seek change and courageous enough to do their utmost in a bold bid to realise that change.

This is the point at which I feel our professional body comes of age. The point at which we are mature enough to profess that we can only achieve our ambitions for this profession not by pursuing our own agenda or through acting as a member association with a narrow focus on member interests but instead by recognising that the first duty of a professional body is to serve the profession itself and all of its many and varied stakeholders.

We understand that, across the sector, there are valuable relationships currently being used for narrow benefit that could be developed to serve the greater good.

First and foremost, this new Manifesto is about collaboration. It sets out a vision and a series of initiatives that encourage working together to achieve key outcomes. In working to bring about those defined outcomes, all organisations within the sector would maintain full autonomy and retain their own individual identity and traditions while at the same time striving to achieve for the good of all.

Emma Shaw CSyP: chairman of The Security Institute

Emma Shaw CSyP: chairman of The Security Institute

A Manifesto for Professional Security: The Background

Undoubtedly, these are times of immense and rapid change for the security profession and all of its practitioners. The nature of the security threat is changing. Accessible information technologies, global networks, diversification of threats and disruptive technologies will all create risks for the public, for society and for businesses in equal measure. These complex threats require complex solutions and, in turn, this will demand far greater collaboration and co-operation from – and between – those responsible for the security of assets as well as the host organisations representing them.

We also need to remember that it’s not only security professionals who are our stakeholders. Ultimately, the end user of all our services is the general public and The Security Institute feels that not enough has been done to include that public in our thinking as a profession.

There’s a need for greater understanding of what the public perceives as threats, which tend towards the local and short term rather than the international and longer term focus of the Government’s National Security Strategy. Through its professional bodies, the security profession must strive to build bridges with the public it seeks to protect. It is the members of the public who are our primary stakeholders.

Following on from this, security also must engage more actively with its user stakeholders in a bid to demystify its practices and make its own case for wider recognition as a force for good in society. On an individual level, security must strive to promote a clear understanding and appreciation of the things the security profession does on a daily basis to maintain stakeholder well-being.

At a time when security is becoming ever more ubiquitous and might be perceived by some as overbearing, we absolutely cannot afford to let the public lose faith in the professionals who work tirelessly to manage and mitigate the risks it faces and, in so doing, keep members of the public safe.

In the pursuit of greater degrees of security, it must be said that a fine line exists between protecting members of the public and infringing their civil liberties. Here, the security profession has the opportunity to be a reassuring and independent presence between the public and the legislature. We can offer a reliable information channel.

Taking this argument a stage further, the security profession has to encourage an ongoing debate around the moral basis of security. It’s also fair to say that ethical challenges will frequently arise as technology empowers the profession to gather, analyse and use data about citizens.

The Security Institute has launched 'A Manifesto for Professional Security'

The Security Institute has launched ‘A Manifesto for Professional Security’

The security profession must evolve

The Institute feels strongly that the security profession must evolve in line with the changing nature of risks and equip practitioners to cope with those risks in order to enable them to meet the challenges facing society at large. Technology is one of the key drivers of change, and the security profession – and its cohort – needs to demonstrate the technical and intellectual skills that enable effective working within this environment.

New tools can help transform the sector. For example, big data analytics might be made into working tools, enabling complex data to be turned into smart data and allowing data analysis on a massive scale that quickly provides deeper insights while creating new types of services for host organisations.

We should also consider the make-up of the security profession. Security is still widely viewed as a second career for those coming out of the military or the police service. We need to encourage young people to enter the security world as a first-choice profession after leaving school or university.

Greater and closer co-operation between stakeholder organisations is essential if we are all to fulfil our individual organisational obligations to the profession.

What, then, are the reasons why things we would all agree need to be done are not being done? First, it’s apparent to many of us that ‘Security’ simply doesn’t speak the language of business or the public effectively and so doesn’t participate in the conversations that frequently set the agenda.

Second, one of the strengths of the security sector is the engagement of its members and the vibrant groups, associations and institutes they establish – but this is also its weakness. The security sector is fragmented and lacking in clear leadership.

We also believe that the nature of the relationship between the profession and the public should change. ‘Security’ needs to develop a relationship with the public whereby the users are the ones demanding the services rather than having services they haven’t asked for imposed upon them.

Returning once more to the key theme of collaboration and co-operation, The Security Institute feels there’s an overriding need for a true and sustaining partnership between the security profession, businesses and institutions and the general public.

The Front Cover of the new 'Manifesto for Professional Security'

The Front Cover of the new ‘Manifesto for Professional Security’

Setting aside parochial interests

The Manifesto asks a number of things of various stakeholders within this profession and those who have influence over it. However diverse, large or small they may be, we call upon all of the professional bodies in this industry to set aside any parochial interests and join with us in working independently and in parallel for the benefit of our profession, our industry and our society.

We call on educational bodies and awarding bodies to join with the professional bodies and examine the future development of structured learning programmes designed to up-skill the security workforce.

We call upon key commercial organisations to work with the professional bodies and provide the funding and support that some of these initiatives will entail.

We call upon Parliament and its many agencies to establish an enabling, meaningful and ongoing dialogue with the profession to ensure it develops in a manner that’s entirely consistent with the needs of Government and society.

To achieve this, the Manifesto proposes a number of initiatives that we – the professional bodies and member associations in the security sector – can establish through working together.

We encourage thoughtful and dynamic collaboration between groups, businesses and individuals. We believe we should establish a Security Commonwealth wherein all organisations come together on an equal basis, retaining their full individual autonomy while working collectively on the development of common approaches to joint challenges

We propose that we should work collaboratively with all willing groups and individuals within the industry to set up a Security Information Service. This will afford the public general advice via a website – ideally sponsored by the industry and, possibly, Government – on all aspects of personal, domestic, travel and cyber security. This can be used to steer public opinion in a favourable direction.

The Security Information Service will share information on how professional security succeeds at major events, such as the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, as well as on a day-to-day basis in peoples’ lives, for instance when they’re at the shops or using public transport. We will celebrate the achievements of those working for the public and support measures to address the abuse and misuse of security.

We wish to work together to improve and heighten the profile of the sector. The Security Institute encourages collaboration with universities and education providers, schools and university careers services and employers. We want to establish clear career paths that demonstrate progress from first entering the profession to roles in the top strata via specialist and generalist positions, technical and business roles.

Put simply, we need to show security to be the challenging, intellectually stimulating, exciting and public-serving discipline that it most certainly is. We can do this through the medium of a Security Careers Advisory Service.

The Foreword is written by Lord Carlile of Berriew, The Security Institute's president

The Foreword is written by Lord Carlile of Berriew CBE QC, The Security Institute’s president

Common position on professionalism

We want to work together on developing and sharing a common position on professionalism within our industry. Our joint aim should be the UK becoming the exemplar model that the world can copy. We can create a Working Group, entitled Security Outreach, and target this outreach to opinion formers, politicians and management organisations such as the CBI and the Institute of Directors. We can increase awareness through the Human Resources profession, the purchasing and supply function and Facilities Management, all of which are key enablers in our area.

We act together to promote The Gold Standard created by The Worshipful Company of Security Professionals, that of the Chartered Security Professional. We act in unison with other industry bodies to create a common point of view and voice that we will use to approach Government with clearly thought-out suggestions designed to encourage and influence the development of a Government White Paper on the future of the security profession. Security Outreach will play a key role in this process.

To ensure that our voice is heard we propose the creation of a Joint Security Associations’ Lobbying Group that would speak on behalf of all the associations – and through them – when representing the profession and its members.

There’s full recognition that this is an ambitious manifesto and requires all stakeholders in the security sector – the associations, the trade bodies, members of the press and individual members – to come together and work effectively for the good of the security profession.

Let’s recognise that we have a great deal in common and that, first and foremost, all bodies in the sector were established to support the members of this profession. There’s much we can and will continue to offer as individual associations, but let’s be brave enough to recognise that there will be many occasions when, if we are to be truly effective, the fact is we are better together, speaking with one voice and promoting a common viewpoint with the weight of our individual organisations firmly behind us.

We recognise that our ambition for the development of the profession is beyond the ability and resources of any one group, organisation or professional association within the sector. We realise that there are many perspectives on the future of the security profession and the broader sector, and that there are informed voices outside of our organisation who can claim thought leadership.

Strong contribution to the sector

We have no wish to necessarily lead these initiatives but undertake to work tirelessly to get them off the ground and to give them our full and continuing support as a willing participant. Indeed, so determined are we to make them a reality that we’re ready to contemplate a future in which The Security Institute itself may cease to exist in its present form and would possibly be subsumed within a larger, more representative grouping that carries greater authority through its universality.

As a professional body, The Security Institute is rightly proud of its journey over the past 15 years. The organisation has made a strong contribution to the sector. However, if this Manifesto meets with an enthusiastic response from other organisations, and we’re able to use its contents in bringing greater cohesion to the profession at large, then this will be our finest achievement to date.

Winston Churchill once famously stated: “I never worry about action, but only inaction.” Together, we have an opportunity before us to start something that’s truly great. Let’s not allow that opportunity to be brought to a halt through inaction. Work with The Security Institute to make it so.

*Read ‘Recognised, Respected and Professional: A Manifesto for Professional Security

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NICE Systems partners with G4S subsidiary AMAG Technology to integrate NICE Situator with Symmetry access control system

NICE Systems has announced its partnership with AMAG Technology, a G4S subsidiary, for the integration of the NICE Situator Physical Security Information Management (PSIM) solution with AMAG Technology’s Symmetry access control system. The joint solution can be used by command and control centres worldwide to improve situational awareness and streamline incident management.

The integration enables bi-directional communication between Symmetry and Situator. This means Situator can receive real-time Symmetry access control alerts and display these events along with access records and images of permitted personnel.

Situator’s ability to pull in data from a wide range of security systems means that Symmetry access control information can also be correlated with information from other sensors for accurate alerting. Once an alert is received, Situator’s automated processes guide operators through response plans to improve management efficiency and minimise risk.

Several utilities companies and ports are already using the integrated solution for day-to-day security operations, allowing them to more easily identify access breaches and to improve collaboration between relevant parties.

Leading expertise in PSIM

Shae Taylor, Symmetry’s extended business solutions programme manager at AMAG Technology, explained: “We’re thrilled to certify NICE as a partner in our Symmetry Extended Business Solutions Programme. NICE’s leading expertise in PSIM and situation management complements our advanced access control technology, enabling end users to benefit from an intelligent and unified solution.”

Chris Wooten; executive vice-president at the NICE Security Group

Chris Wooten; executive vice-president at the NICE Security Group

Chris Wooten, executive vice-president for the NICE Security Group, added: “Security operations are already benefiting from the enhanced situational awareness and streamlined incident management afforded by this integrated solution. The integration is available globally for any customer that wants to leverage Situator and Symmetry together. End users can have confidence in the rigorous testing and certification process that has taken place.”

NICE Systems’ security solutions help organisations capture, analyse and leverage big data to anticipate, manage and mitigate security and safety risks and improve operations. The NICE security, intelligence and cyber offerings provide valuable insights that enable enterprises and Government agencies to take the best action at the right time by correlating structured and unstructured data from multiple sensors and channels, detecting irregular patterns and recogniszing trends.

The company’s solutions have been deployed to help secure a broad range of organisations and events such as banks, utility companies, airports, seaports, city centres, transportation systems, sporting events and diplomatic meetings.

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Big data ‘not a game played by different rules’ states the ICO

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has set out how big data can – and must – operate within data protection law.

The regulator’s latest report outlines that operating within the law should not be seen as a barrier to innovation.

Big data is a way of analysing data that typically uses massive datasets, brings together data from different sources and can analyse the data in real time. It often uses personal data, be that looking at broad trends in aggregated sets of data or creating detailed profiles in relation to individuals (for example, around lending or insurance decisions).

The ICO’s report sets out how the law applies when big data uses personal information. It details which aspects of the law organisations need to particularly consider, and highlights that organisations can stay the right side of the law and still innovate.

Buzz around big data

Announcing the publication of the report Steve Wood, the ICO’s head of policy delivery, said: “There is a buzz around big data and emerging evidence of its economic and social benefits. However, we’ve seen a lot of organisations who are raising questions about how they can innovate to find these benefits and still comply with the law. Individuals are also showing they’re concerned about how their data is being used and shared in big data-type scenarios.”

Big Data's on the ICO's radar

Big Data’s on the ICO’s radar

Wood continued: “What we’re saying in this report is that many of the challenges of compliance can be overcome by companies being open about what they’re doing. Organisations need to think of innovative ways to tell customers what they want to do and what they’re hoping to achieve. Not only does that go a long way towards complying with the law, but there are also benefits from being seen as responsible custodians of data.”

The report addresses concerns raised by some commentators that current data protection law doesn’t fit with big data.

“Big data can work within the established data protection principles,” said Wood. “The basic data protection principles already established in UK and EU law are flexible enough to cover big data. Applying those principles involves asking all the questions that anyone undertaking big data ought to be asking. Big data is not a game that is played by different rules. The principles are still fit for purpose, but organisations need to innovate when applying them.”

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