Tag Archives: Apple

Vanderbilt to showcase all-new ACT Enterprise solution at Security Essen

Vanderbilt, the state-of-the-art security systems specialist, will showcase the latest version of ACT Enterprise at Security Essen 2018. Along with demonstrations of the access control software solution, visitors to Security Essen can explore the full range of products that Vanderbilt has to offer at Stand 6D90, with a significant focus on increased integration across the company’s products and, indeed, with third party systems.

The latest ACT Enterprise features – which include integration with Vanderbilt’s award-winning SPC intrusion system, a rules mapping engine and a smart phone app – were previewed at IFSEC International in June and received a wave of positive feedback from visitors to the show at ExCeL.

“Our ACT Enterprise Apple and Android compatible apps mean real-time monitoring, user management and administration from your smart phone,” stated Andrew Fulton, head of the access control product line at Vanderbilt. “You can enable and disable alarms, lock and unlock doors, authorise users and check who’s in and who’s out from wherever you are. Security has never been more convenient, and you’ve never been more in control.”

Rules mapping

One of the key features is the ease-of-use and simplicity of ACT Enterprise’s rules mapping to enable advanced configurations of various system inputs and outputs across the access control system, as well as integrated video and intruder elements of an integrated system.

Michael Moyna, technical product marketing manager at Vanderbilt, observed: “The use of rules mapping simplifies the implementation of more complex events/alarms and associated actions for the installer/integrator by permitting the creation of logical relationships between system elements via a drag-and-drop interface. For the end user, the addition of rules mapping ensures that system interactions can be seamlessly introduced on a system-wide basis, thus enabling a higher level of added value to be realised, both for security and business-based functionalities.”

VanderbiltSPCConnect

Integration will continue to be a priority, with a significant focus being placed on technology partnerships that enhance Vanderbilt’s functionality and reach in the market. On top of ACT Enterprise’s integration with SPC, the solution now also integrates with ASSA Abloy’s Aperio wireless components.

In addition, the much-touted SPC-Milestone plug-in will be on display. This plug-in enables users to control SPC from within the Milestone system. The plug-in is aimed at improving the customer experience by providing a bi-directional communication strategy with the enhancement of a robust surveillance solution in line with the ethos of ‘the customer first’. The SPC Milestone plug-in features options such as filters for event transmissions and remote interaction based on customisable command profile, while ATS/ATP logs offer transparent communication.

New wireless devices

Vanderbilt’s newly-released SPC Wireless devices, which include detectors, panic buttons, fobs and a transceiver, will also be on show at Security Essen. The devices feature sleek and modern lines to complement the interior styles of many environments, such as retail stores. This range of products was designed in response to growing consumer Internet of Things trends and, as a result, presents a significant revenue opportunity for installers in boosting their SPC portfolio offering.

“Installs for Vanderbilt’s SPC Wireless devices were designed to be hassle-free,” explained Ross Wilks, head of marketing communications at Vanderbilt. “In contrast, a wired solution can take, at a minimum, a day’s work when it comes to fitting cable. By reducing time on site, Vanderbilt’s SPC Wireless can enable installers to get more work done elsewhere, essentially meaning more profits from more jobs.”

Vanderbilt will also be sharing its expertise in Software-as-a-Service solutions, with ‘How To’ demonstrations on ways that installers can derive the most out of the company’s award-winning solutions, namely ACT365 and SPC Connect.

*Security Essen takes place between 25-28 September. For more information on Vanderbilt’s attendance at the event visit https://vanderbiltindustries.com/events/essen

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Norbain announces arrival of latest Seos Profile range from HID

Norbain has announced the launch of HID’s latest Seos technology, which now includes the ability to use mobile devices for secure access and efficiently manage multiple applications.

The new range consists of the following components:

HID Seos Profile Readers

The latest readers in the SE Portfolio. The readers use the Seos platform which offers the simplest configuration and Best in Class security and privacy protection. Additionally, the readers are available to be used with HID Mobile Access.

NorbainHIDiClass

HID Mobile Access

Allows the user to download an app to their smart phone and take advantage of either NFC or Bluetooth to communicate with the reader and allow entry. The system is seamless to set up and install, offering the next generation in access control. The app can be downloaded via the Apple app store or Google Play (Android).

iClass Seos Cards

Based on the latest technology from HID Global, Seos cards work seamlessly out of the box with Seos Profile readers and offer Best in Class security and privacy. The cards represent the perfect solution for environments where multiple legacy reader technologies are in place and the move to advanced, more secure technology is desired.

Anne Wesley, product marketing manager for access control at Norbain, commented: “Products in HID’s new Seos range of readers and cards allow end users to advance to the more secure technology now being offered. With products that can seamlessly integrate into legacy systems, this allows end user customers to not only manage the move into more advanced security, but also upgrade security at a pace that’s suitable for their budget.”

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Xtralis ADPRO iRespond mobile app and Nano video transmitter victorious at 2015 PSI Premier Awards

The ADPRO iRespond mobile app and the HeiTel by Xtralis Nano video transmitter developed for body-worn cameras have won the Software/IT Product of the Year category at this year’s PSI Premier Awards run by Risk UK’s sister publication Professional Security Installer.

Xtralis provides mobile situational awareness solutions for end users, protecting and guiding first responders to deliver a comprehensive, effective and efficient response on a safe basis.

Left to Right: PSI's Editor Andy Clutton, Marie Kemshall of Xtralis and former England Rugby Union international player Brian Moore

Left to Right: PSI’s Editor Andy Clutton, Marie Kemshall of Xtralis and former England Rugby Union international player Brian Moore

ADPRO iRespond is a mobile application designed for first responders to provide event notification and live remote video views at sites protected by ADPRO Remotely Managed Multi-Service Gateways (RMG) including the FastTrace 2 and iFT Series. Armed with a simple PIN issued by the Central Monitoring Station, first responders obtain recorded and live situational awareness of a threat such that risk is reduced and response is efficient and effective.

The free application is available for Apple mobile devices in the iTunes app store at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/adpro-irespond/id878110903.

Detail of the ADPRO iRespond

Detail of the ADPRO iRespond

The HeiTel by Xtralis Nano transmitter provides for the reliable transmission of live and recorded video, bi-directional audio and GPS information over wireless technologies including 4G, LTE and CDMA mobile phone technology as well as satellite, Wi-Fi and broadband networks.

The Nano transmitter is battery-powered and works with a wide variety of cameras. It’s ideal for body-worn vest configurations.

For its part, the live and recorded video may be accessed remotely from a Control Room, PC, laptop, iPad, PDA, iPhone or Android device. It’s possible for six people to access the images simultaneously in different places via different methods.

“We’re extremely proud to have won a PSI Award three years in a row,” commented Mick Goodfellow, vice-president of European sales at Xtralis. “Being chosen by professional security installers over six other solutions is a clear validation that Xtralis continues to deliver value and innovation for the security market.”

Goodfellow added: “Worldwide interest in iRespond and the Nano transmitter is incredible as first responders embrace Xtralis technology for efficient threat response. These solutions not only protect end customers, but also reduce risk and increase the overall effectiveness of first responders.”

The Xtralis Nano Device

The Xtralis Nano Device

Xtralis offers powerful solutions for the early detection of fire, gas and security threats. The company’s technologies prevent disasters by giving users time to respond before life, critical infrastructure or business continuity is compromised.

Protecting high value and irreplaceable assets belonging to the world’s top Governments and businesses, the company’s brands include VESDA and VESDA-E (very early warning aspirating smoke detection systems) ICAM for flexible ASD, the ECO gas detection and environmental monitoring modules for VESDA and ICAM systems, OSID (smoke detection for open areas) ADPRO and ADPRO-E (advanced, intelligent access, perimeter and intrusion detection solutions for multi-site and enterprise security), HeiTel – digital video remote monitoring – and ASIM for intelligent traffic detection.

*Further information for end users is available at: www.xtralis.com

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Apple NFC could be “lightning rod” for change in access control sector

In the latest Research Note issued by IHS, Blake Kozak – the company’s senior analyst in the sphere of security and building technologies – discusses how the new NFC and Apply Pay features of the iPhone 6 could be the “lightning rod” to finally spark changes in the way that mobile credentials are used for access control.

For more than four years now, one of the most talked about trends has been Near Field Communication (NFC). NFC was supposed to change the face of the access control world by eliminating the need for cards, subsequently reducing the administrative burden on organisations of all sizes while at the same time increasing security.

However, this scenario has not yet come to pass, with suppliers to date offering little more than pilot projects and limited real world installations.

Of course, NFC isn’t a new concept. In 2006, Nokia released the first NFC phone. Four years later, Samsung issued the first Android NFC phone before announcing its inaugural Secu-NFC technology a year later. According to Samsung, the Secu-NFC chip combines an NFC controller and a secure element storing personal information and security keys with advanced encryption technologies.

Then, last year, Samsung and Visa announced a major partnership for mobile payments.

Today, the list of NFC-enabled phones is extensive. Examples include Alcatel, Asus, BlackBerry, Nexus, HTC, Kyocera and LG (among many others).

The iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus

The iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus

Barriers to NFC’s implementation in access control

Historically, most NFC installations were instigated by partnerships between handset manufacturers and financial institutions, in turn producing closed systems with limited opportunity for developers to expand the concept to uses beyond mobile payment.

IHS believes this has been one of the main barriers to the implementation of NFC in the access control sector.

On Tuesday of this week, Apple announced that NFC would be a feature of the new iPhone 6. While Apple Pay is primarily a mechanism for secure mobile payments, there appears to be plenty of opportunity for other applications since iOS 8 will also have an Apple Pay application programming interface (API) available for developers.

Already, many retailers and restaurants have implemented Apple Pay within their own applications, allowing patrons to skip lines and pay/order directly from a mobile device. According to Apple, the mobile payment transaction occurs by assigning a unique device account number which is encrypted and securely stored in the secure element (a dedicated chip inside the iPhone). When a purchase is made, the device account number alongside a transaction-specific dynamic security code is used to process the payment. On that basis, the actual credit or debit card numbers are never shared with merchants or transmitted with payment.

The true benefit of this announcement for the access control sector is the potential use of the open API for developers. Although Samsung Galaxy has an embedded SE and countless other devices offer subscriber identification module (SIM)-based SE, there has been limited traction for access control.

There are many forms of secure element, including the universal integrated circuit card (UICC), NFC SIM, embedded SE, external (sticker or sleeve) and microSD. The most used formats are UICC and embedded, with the new iPhone 6 featuring an embedded SE.

According to the 2014 IHS report on NFC, 18.2% of cellular handsets shipped in 2013 were NFC-enabled (up from about 8% in 2012). IHS forecasts the number of phones that are NFC-enabled to reach about 1.17 billion by 2018.

The report also estimates that, in 2013, around 70% of NFC secure element implementations within cellular handsets were embedded while 27% resided on the SIM card.

What does this mean for the access control sector?

Apple’s announcement addresses one of the barriers the access control sector has faced with regards to NFC (ie loading an identifier onto the secure element). With the API mentioned by Apple, it’s possible that access control manufacturers – among others in the supply chain – could load and command an identifier directly onto the secure element. Currently, most providers of NFC-based access control are using encryption methods located in the sandbox (host operating system) of the handset only rather than the SE.

By using host card emulation (HCE), providers are able to offer NFC outside of the SE. Although this isn’t deemed a Best Practice method, the only other means to provide mobile access control through NFC would be to partner with all the cellular carriers and providers which can be an incredibly arduous process. By partnering, the access supplier is allowed access to the SE, which is typically either embedded or in the SIM card.

One example of such a partnership is HID and Oberthur Technologies. In 2013, HID announced a partnership with Oberthur Technologies to carry Seos digital keys on NFC SIM cards.

As mentioned above, the Apple announcement could make it easier for access control suppliers to provide mobile credentials with the true security afforded by the secure element.

Beyond the buzz, the market opportunity for access control remains unclear. Only time will tell if Apple providing mobile payment will ‘jump start’ NFC usage for access control. Some access control manufacturers speculate that the use of the secure element may not always be necessary and that the encryption provided for access control data on the handset is sufficient for most end users.

Impact on the access control sector

How quickly could this announcement impact access control? Today, data suggests that less than 3% of retailers (or 220,000 out of about nine million) will be using the mobile payments at the start. One of the main reasons for low adoption is the lack of infrastructure in stores.

However, every credit card in the US, for example, will be required to have EMV Chip and PIN technology by October 2015. As a result, merchants could decide to move forward with NFC capabilities since they will need to upgrade their system in any case.

Interestingly enough, Apple is initially only launching in the US which has the lowest penetration rate of mobile payments compared with all other regions. There is a tremendous upside though. Access control end users already have the infrastructure in place to support NFC (eg the smart card reader, 13.56 MHz). While some pieces of the system (such as incompatible hardware and software) may need upgrading, the system is mostly ready.

The iPhone 6 is larger than the iPhone 5S

The iPhone 6 is larger than the iPhone 5S

Unlike the retail space, which has to replace millions of terminals and retrain employees, access control is already primed for the transition.

Overall, Apple could instigate change for the access control sector. However, adoption will remain low due to the other barriers which have not been addressed, such as mobile phone issuance to colleagues and identifying which department in an organisation will manage the mobile credentials. In most cases, the phone would be managed by IT and the security credential would be managed by the Security Department.

New policies and procedures will have to be created and many end users will still be issued with badges for identification purposes.

Bluetooth: a viable alternative to NFC

Bluetooth is becoming a viable alternative to NFC. Security suppliers have been working for the past several years to partner with NFC and implement it beyond pilot projects but to little avail.

As a result, many are turning to Bluetooth, which is deemed by many to be a more robust option for security purposes such as access control since, for instance, the read range can be modified.

Additionally, Bluetooth has a longer history with smart phones than NFC. Bluetooth was introduced in 2000 and NFC in 2006.

While the Apple announcement sets the ball rolling for NFC in the physical security space by providing more outlets for app developers to create a unique user experience, other barriers still need to be overcome before a state of critical mass is attained.

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Mobile phone theft research report highlights models targeted by thieves

Research published by Home Secretary Theresa May not only highlights the most popular handsets targeted by thieves but also sets out practical steps to protect mobile phones from being stolen.

The research paper includes a ‘Mobile Phone Theft Ratio’ that shows which handsets may be most likely to be targeted by thieves.

The paper – which was produced with the Behavioural Insights Team and pieced together in consultation with the mobile phone industry – also sets out practical steps as to how members of the public can protect their mobile phones from being stolen.

The Mobile Phone Theft Ratio – based on data for the period August 2012 to January 2014 – is topped by the Apple iPhone models 5, 5C, 5S and 4S followed by the BlackBerry 9790 in fifth place. Samsung Galaxy and HTC phones also feature on the index.

Mobile phone theft is an increasing problem

Mobile phone theft is an increasing problem

The likelihood of a phone being targeted by thieves is driven by a number of factors, including the overall desirability of the phone itself, the ease of access to valuable personal data stored on handsets and the perceived risk of the phone being tracked once it has been stolen.

Level of theft remains a concern

Home Secretary Theresa May said: “Crime has fallen by more than 10% under this Government. This is good news for a safer England and Wales. However, the level of mobile phone theft remains a concern. People are increasingly carrying their lives in their pockets, with bank details, e-mails and other sensitive personal information easily accessible through mobile phones. This is why it’s vital that Government, the police service and industry work together to tackle this form of criminality.”

The Home Secretary continued: “The Mobile Phone Theft Ratio will inform consumers about which mobile phones are most targeted by thieves. We are also working with industry to stop the reactivation of phones overseas, thereby killing the export market on which organised criminals rely. The mobile phone industry is already taking vital action to introduce features that enable phones to be tracked and wiped if they are stolen. It’s encouraging to see that these security improvements have contributed to recorded theft from the person falling by 10% in the last year, according to the most recent crime statistics.”

The paper highlights the success of new features, such as the new iOS7 operating system developed by Apple, and the Find My Mobile and Reactivation Lock features introduced by Samsung.

Intelligence from the Metropolitan Police Service suggests that the iOS7 system has already affected the black market value of stolen phones.

The research paper also shows that people are most likely to have their phones stolen directly from their person (through pick-pocketing) or when the handset is briefly left unattended, for example at a table in a bar. The data highlights that certain groups are particularly vulnerable: 14-24 year olds, and most notably women are more likely than any other group to be the victims of mobile phone theft.

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IHS Research Note: ‘Residential Security – Something for everyone’

In the company’s latest Research Note, Blake Kozak (senior analyst for security and building technologies at IHS) discusses the impact of the ‘smart home’ on residential security.

The residential security market will never be the same. In 2012, several MSOs (multiple-system operators) in the USA began offering home automation in conjunction with security which has altered the perception and demand from end users. Prior to this paradigm shift, the use of a residential burglar alarm system was often a purchase to protect a property and, in many cases, an ‘after the fact’ purchase as a result of a break in.

While many reasons exist as to why a homeowner may purchase security equipment, the reason is no longer solely security, with many end users looking to add additional features which are both life safety and convenience-driven.

IHS estimates the world market for security devices in traditionally monitored homes [for example – ADT] to be worth about $2.9 billion in 2014 compared with $670 million for smart homes [for example – ADT Pulse].

By 2018, the revenue of smart homes is forecast to top $2.4 billion. That’s according to a recent report from IHS.

Smart Home Security: market size and rate of growth

Smart Home Security: market size and rate of growth

These rapid changes to the residential security market have been mostly positive. However, the influx of competitors has dramatically changed the make-up of this industry.

Ten years ago, professionally installed, centrally monitored systems were the main offer available to end users. However, this situation has changed. Today, products are offered by monitoring companies, MSOs, electric companies, retailers and DIY equipment manufacturers.

End users can find innovative products from new market entrants such as Google and Apple which, until recently, did not have an offering for the residential security or home automation space.

So what does this mean for the ‘smart’ residential security market moving forward? For manufacturers, it means that despite the increase in competition, the market offers ample opportunity for all due to the current low penetration rate of smart products.

For end users, it means more product/solution and pricing options are available than ever before.

Finally, as far as the dealers, installers and monitoring companies are concerned, the release of new and innovative products/solutions creates better sales opportunities by dint of being able to better meet customers’ needs and budgets.

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Home Office: ‘Online advice service launched to thwart mobile phone thieves’

A new online advice service to help people protect their mobile phone handsets from thieves has gone live today. The advice has been published on Police.uk with the support of major phone manufacturers Apple, Blackberry, LG, Samsung, Sony, Nokia and Windows Phones.

The service encourages members of the public to make more use of their phone’s security features, including innovations such as tracking, wiping data from or locking stolen handsets remotely using another Internet-enabled device.

The service also provides links to information on each manufacturer’s security features, including how to switch them on.

There are tips on avoiding mobile phone theft in the first place, such as taking extra care to keep handsets secure in busy locations and never leaving a mobile phone unattended.

Mobile phones are an attractive target for thieves. Handsets can be sold for hundreds of pounds overseas, where the newest models are not yet available

Mobile phones are an attractive target for thieves. Handsets can be sold for hundreds of pounds overseas, where the newest models are not yet available

Statistics on mobile phone theft

In 2012-2013 there were 742,000 victims of mobile phone theft in England and Wales. Sixteen to 24-year-olds are the most likely age group to be the target of ‘theft from the person’ offences.

Crime prevention minister Norman Baker has held a series of meetings with leaders in the mobile phone manufacturing industry to discuss what more can be done to tackle mobile phone theft.

“Crime is down more than 10% but theft from the person has gone up, bucking the overall trend,” explained Baker. “It’s clear much of this is generated by the theft of mobile phones, iPads and the like. I have challenged the industry to do more to make such thefts unattractive, for example by making it easier to immobilise stolen devices. I’m pleased to see that we are now making progress.”

Baker continued: “One part of this is the online advice service which is a vital new tool that will help people protect their handsets and make would-be thieves think twice. Mobile phone technology is changing all the time and we need innovative solutions to ensure we stay ahead of criminals.”

Leader in responding to mobile phone crime

The UK is a world leader in responding to mobile phone crime, with the industry and the police already working together to block stolen phones within 48 hours – stopping them being re-used in this country and making them less valuable.

Mobile phones are an attractive target for thieves. Handsets can be sold for hundreds of pounds overseas, where the newest models are not yet available.

Latest figures from the Crime Survey for England and Wales showed 40% of thefts from the person involve a mobile phone.

The latest quarterly police recorded crime statistics were published in January, and cover the three months to the end of September 2013. They show ‘theft from the person offences’ are up by 7% and a rise in shoplifting offences of 4%.

The Government has started publishing street-level information on ‘theft from the person’ on crime maps so that Police and Crime Commissioners and the public can hold their local force to account.

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