Tag Archives: Andrew Rennison

UK Surveillance Camera Commissioner issues Annual Report 2013-2014

The UK Surveillance Camera Commissioner’s inaugural Annual Report outlines both the work the Commissioner, Tony Porter, has completed and his future plans.

The report explains how the Commissioner:

*continues to promote the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice to relevant and non-relevant authorities
*has launched an easy to use self-assessment tool for any organisation to demonstrate how they are meeting the principles contained in the Code
*has continued the work of his predecessor, Andrew Rennison, to simplify the CCTV standards framework in order to encourage the industry and operators of CCTV systems to meet minimum standards
*will be issuing guidance to users of domestic CCTV following his concerns about the growing number of complaints around the use of CCTV at people’s homes

Download a copy of the Annual Report 2013-2014

Tony Porter: UK Surveillance Camera Commissioner

Tony Porter: UK Surveillance Camera Commissioner

Foreword to the Annual Report

In the Foreword to the Annual Report, in which he addresses Home Secretary Theresa May, Tony Porter states:

“I am pleased to present to you the first Annual Report from the Surveillance Camera Commissioner. This report covers the period from the appointment of the first Surveillance Camera Commissioner (on 13 September 2012). I am grateful to my predecessor Andrew Rennison who undertook the functions of the Surveillance Camera Commissioner until his departure in February 2014. Much of his work is reflected in the body of the report and he has kindly attached an open letter which follows this Foreword.

“I intend to ensure that the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice (PoFA Code) is promoted to relevant authorities under S33 (5) of the Protection of Freedoms Act so that they fully understand and fulfil their duty to have regard to the PoFA Code. I also intend to explore other opportunities to promote the PoFA Code to non-relevant authorities, thereby seeking voluntary adoption across a broad range of sectors.

“According to a survey conducted by the British Security Industry Association on the number of cameras in the UK (published in July 2013), just 1 in 70 of CCTV systems are state owned. This reinforces that a major part of my role is to reach out to others who use overt surveillance in public space – not solely relevant authorities. I will detail plans later in the report, but I have already met with universities and spoken to some residential social landlords and the British Retail Consortium and will continue to reach out to others to whom the PoFA Code is applicable.

“The use of CCTV in domestic environments continues to cause concern among the public and is a high generator of complaints across various agencies. With a view to showing leadership in the sector, I have said publicly that I intend to explore ways of working with manufacturers, retailers, installers, consumers and the Information Commissioner’s Office to impart the principles of the PoFA Code.

“That said, there remains much to do to achieve that goal. I have worked with some relevant authorities, particularly public space CCTV managers in local authorities that show enormous enterprise in adopting the principles within the PoFA Code. However, it has been brought to our attention that the application of the PoFA Code is not consistent throughout all relevant authorities. We have been made aware of instances where some traffic enforcement officers, often using the same cameras as those used to deliver crime and disorder reduction strategies, do not deliver the same level of compliance to the PoFA Code. Accordingly, where dual use CCTV Operations Rooms are in use I intend to raise the obligations within the PoFA Code to encourage compliance.

“There remain a large number of surveillance camera system users who are not under a duty to have regard to the PoFA Code. By focusing on the larger scale operators via seminars, webinars and personal engagement, I intend to raise the profile of the PoFA Code. My aim is to secure voluntary adoption and achieve surveillance by consent across the broadest range of organisations.

“Application of the PoFA Code not only delivers benefits to society in terms of privacy, security of public safety, transparency and reassurance but also benefits business through better performance and cost reduction. This will be my mantra going forward.”

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Dr Gillian Tully takes on key role of Forensic Science Regulator

The Home Office today has announced the appointment of a new Forensic Science Regulator. Dr Gillian Tully will replace Andrew Rennison, whose term of office will come to an end next month.

The Forensic Science Regulator is an independent role responsible for establishing and enforcing quality standards for forensic science used in the investigation and prosecution of crime.

Dr Tully’s three-year term of appointment will begin on 17 November 2014.

Dr Gillian Tully

Dr Gillian Tully

Experience and judgement

A self-employed consultant in forensic science providing advice on casework, expert training and quality systems, Dr Tully previously spent 23 years working in the Forensic Science Service, which included a four-year period as head of Research and Development.

Norman Baker, Minister for Crime Prevention, said: “Dr Gillian Tully has the experience and judgement necessary for this important role, dealing with those who deliver forensic service, the industry and Government. I should like to record the Government’s appreciation to Andrew Rennison for his contribution in successfully introducing the first set of quality standards in forensic science.”

Dr Tully added: “I am looking forward to taking up this very challenging role and will endeavour to provide my full support to all those involved in forensic science as we aim to continually improve standards.”

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Antony Porter appointed as UK Surveillance Camera Commissioner

The following written ministerial statement has been laid before the House of Commons by Norman Baker MP and in the House of Lords by Lord Taylor of Holbeach, confirming the appointment of Antony Porter as Surveillance Camera Commissioner for the UK.

The Minister of State for Crime Prevention, Norman Baker, comments: “My honourable friend the Minister of State for Criminal Information, Lord Taylor of Holbeach, has today made the following written ministerial statement….”

“I am today announcing arrangements for the appointment of the Surveillance Camera Commissioner under Section 34 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012,” said Lord Taylor.

“Following an open competition overseen by the Office of the Commissioner for Public Appointments, this ministerial appointment will be filled by Mr Antony Porter. Mr Porter’s three-year term of appointment will commence on Monday 10 March 2014.

Lord Taylor of Holbeach

Lord Taylor of Holbeach

“The Surveillance Camera Commissioner appointment has been filled by Mr Andrew Rennison who has now completed his term of office. I should like to record the Government’s appreciation of Mr Rennison’s contribution in laying the foundations for the regulation of surveillance camera systems.

Norman Baker: minister of state for crime prevention at the Home Office

Norman Baker: minister of state for crime prevention at the Home Office

“Mr Rennison also holds the non-statutory appointment of Forensic Science Regulator. Arrangements for the recruitment of a new Forensic Science Regulator are in hand, and Mr Rennison will continue to fulfil that role on a part-time basis until a new appointment is made.”

Key elements of the role

The Surveillance Camera Commissioner is responsible for:

• encouraging compliance with the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice

• providing advice on the effective, appropriate, proportionate and transparent use of surveillance camera systems

• providing advice on operational and technical standards

• reviewing how the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice is working and advising the Government where any changes may be necessary

A retired senior police leader whose roles have included commanding the North West Counter-Terrorism Unit from 2006 to 2012, Antony Porter received the Queen’s Police Medal in the New Year’s Honours List of 2008.

Speaking about his new role, Antony Porter said: “I’m delighted to accept this appointment and must first acknowledge the excellent foundations laid for me by my predecessor, Andrew Rennison.

“This role presents complex and challenging issues that impact on matters of social policy, Human Rights and crime prevention. My commitment to everyone is to ensure an open and transparent approach to the role.

“I will seek to raise levels of confidence across communities and interest groups as to the use of surveillance cameras and the standards against which those systems operate. Technology moves forward at a fast pace, which will present new and dynamic issues in the future. I look forward to building close and working relationships with all interested parties to ensure those challenges are managed and seen to be managed in the public interest.”

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