Tag Archives: ACPO

Christopher Greany appointed to lead National Police Co-ordination Centre

Commander Christopher Greany has been appointed to lead the National Police Co-ordination Centre (NPoCC).

Greany joins the NPoCC from his previous role as national co-ordinator for domestic extremism. He led the large-scale review and restructure of the National Domestic Extremism Unit and created the National Domestic Extremism and Disorder Intelligence Unit.

Greany began his career 27 years ago in the Metropolitan Police Service and has also worked for the City of London Police. He has spent much of that time in counter-terrorism, intelligence, investigations and security.

On taking up his appointment, Commander Greany said: “I’m looking forward to building on the great work carried out by my predecessor ACC Stuart Williams and the team. I’m keen to develop the NPoCC as the ‘Go To’ place for chief constables when they need national support, whether in times of crisis or for big national events such as the recent NATO Summit.”

Commander Christopher Greany

Commander Christopher Greany

Sir Hugh Orde, the President of ACPO, commented: “I’m delighted to welcome Chris to the team and to his important new role. Co-ordinating police assets on a national scale is vital to ensure the service can respond effectively in times of need. The NPoCC has done some first rate work with forces and chief constables across the UK to support the policing of big national events like the NATO Summit and the Commonwealth Games. I’ve no doubt Chris will continue the good work of his predecessor, ACC Stuart Williams, and take the unit from strength to strength.”

The NPoCC is a new unit opened last year by (then) policing minister Damian Green MP and overseen by ACPO President Sir Hugh Orde. The NPoCC team co-ordinates police officers and staff from across UK policing, ensuring the right people are in the right place at the right time.

The NPoCC team is also tasked with mapping the specialist police skills available across the country such that chief constables are aware of what skills are available both regionally and nationally. This work will allow the police service to make the best and most efficient use of its specialist resources while policing budgets reduce.

In more detail, the key functions for the NPoCC are to:

  • Assess national capacity, contribution and capability in relation to the Strategic Policing Requirement and National Policing Requirements (this encompasses developing and maintaining information on the capacity, contribution and capability of specialist assets)
  • Establish and co-ordinate continuous testing and exercising regimes designed to ensure the effective mobilisation of national assets when required
  • Facilitate mutual aid in a steady state and provide a fit-for-purpose co-ordination facility in times of crisis

The NPoCC maintains assessment of capacity by undertaking a regular review of specialist skills. Using the national network of specific force contacts, the NPoCC team gathers this information across an increased range of specialisms referencing the agreed national role profiles while working in collaboration with the College of Policing.

Capability is tested through an extensive exercising programme undertaken with partner agencies including the Home Office, the Cabinet Office’s Civil Contingencies Secretariat, the Department for Communities and Local Government and the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Risk UK News

Skyguard equips Brent Council’s lone workers with personal alarms

Skyguard is providing Brent Council’s front line lone working staff with 24-hour back-up and assistance. The Council’s employees are now able to raise an alarm at any time via the solutions provider’s ACPO-accredited MySOS personal safety device (which offers a simple yet effective way to call for help in any emergency scenario).

Brent Council provides a wide range of community services to the public within its inner London Borough boundary. Some of these services require the Council’s employees to work alone, and occasionally in difficult circumstances.

Conscious of its Duty of Care towards the safety and well-being of all staff members, Brent Council needed a form of personal protection for its lone workers. The requirement was for a small, easy-to-use personal alarm which enables the user to discreetly raise an alarm should they face any difficulties.

MySOS – Europe’s smallest personal alarm – comes fully equipped with the latest mobile phone and tracking technology. At the touch of a button, the Council’s employees can quickly and discreetly call for help.

Upon alarm activation, controllers at Skyguard’s 24-hour Incident Management Centre can see who’s calling for help. They’ll use the two-way audio capability to listen in and assess the situation, talk to and reassure the system end user and action the appropriate emergency response.

The MySOS lone worker protection device

The MySOS lone worker protection device

As the MySOS solution is fitted with GPS tracking technology, controllers can see the user’s exact position as shown via an on-screen map. This is vital for guiding emergency response to the right location. What’s more, all calls and actions are digitally recorded and can be used as legal evidence.

Alarms may be raised when the MySOS’ ‘Man Down’ feature detects a slip, trip or heavy impact. Again, this is vital if the employee is unable to call for help themselves.

Skyguard’s service is fully audited and approved against BS 8484:2011 and, as such, guarantees the highest level of police response when required. Skyguard will also bypass the 999 emergency system, saving what may be crucial minutes in responding to an emergency.

Why Brent Council opted for MySOS

Mike Somers, regeneration officer for Brent Council, explained why the organisation chose Skyguard’s solution.

“Right from the start,” stated Somers, “we found Skyguard’s advice helpful and informative. The sheer helpfulness from meeting with them and the team advising us in terms of what was best for our needs stood out.”

Somers continued: “When it comes to the MySOS devices, they are issued to staff working on housing estates and visiting various site locations. Staff can contact Skyguard’s controllers at any time they are on their visits and the alarm will use various mobile phone network suppliers to ensure they remain in contact. Some lone working products do not have the facility to do this.”

Skyguard’s marketing director Will Murray added: “In the past couple of years, we’ve witnessed a dramatic change in perception as regards the personal protection of employees, notably from local authorities. With legislation continuing to evolve, organisations – be they operational in the public or private sector – can no longer afford to ignore the safety and well-being of their lone workers.”

Murray concluded: “We now work with over 75 Councils nationwide in safeguarding their lone workers. That total includes many long-term customers, and it’s a number that continues to grow on a monthly basis.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Risk UK News

Partnership approach ensures “dramatic” reduction in false alarms

Police are now more likely than ever to respond to genuine alarm activations thanks to a partnership approach developed between themselves and the private security industry which has resulted in a dramatic decrease in the number of false alarm activations.

In the past two decades, the number of false alarm activations generated by security alarm systems has reduced dramatically (from an average of 1.36 per system per year in 1995 to 0.10 per system per year in 2013).

Today, the police service is more likely than ever to respond to a genuine alarm, and more likely to catch criminals in the act when doing so.

Martin Harvey, chairman of the Security Systems Section of the British Security Industry Association (BSIA), explained: “The development of new technology, methodology and standards within the private security sector has contributed significantly to improving the reliability of alarm systems. The introduction of Unique Reference Numbers (URNs) has revolutionised the way in which the police service responds to alarm activations.”

Martin Harvey: chairman of the BSIA's Security Systems Section

Martin Harvey: chairman of the BSIA’s Security Systems Section

Harvey continued: “URN-registered systems are operated to such a high standard that they’re the only systems guaranteeing a police response. The introduction of URNs has succeeded in improving the reliability of systems to such an extent that many insurers are now backing this approach and offering discounts on policies to organisations who have URNs in place.”

Development of industry standards

Historically, the level of false activations from alarm systems was high for a number of reasons, from accidental activation through to incorrect installation or poor maintenance.

With the police wasting more and more time attending false alarms, the security sector and the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) jointly developed industry standards and practices that would actively reduce the number of false activations.

ACPO’s response was to publish a policy on alarm response, first issued in 1990, while the BSIA – representing the UK’s alarm manufacturers and installers – developed several Codes of Practice relating to the installation and maintenance of alarm systems. These went on to become British, European and now international standards.

ACPO’s Policy requires system designers to be knowledgeable, and requires systems themselves to be designed to a certain standard. When it comes to getting the system up-and-running, installation companies carrying out the work must be inspected by a UKAS-accredited inspectorate to ensure they can competently design, install and maintain each system.

Adrian Mealing, chairman of the BSIA’s Security Equipment Manufacturers Section, stated: “Under ACPO’s Policy, the products themselves must also meet certain requirements and the relevant British and European Standards. Many of the components used in systems underwent significant design changes. In the past, it’s possible that many false alarms were generated by poorly designed equipment, which in some cases only met the lowest requirements.”

Inspector Kenneth Meanwell, ACPO’s security industry liaison, commented: “The police service has been very happy to work with the private security industry, and sees the development and adoption of ACPO’s Policy as being a huge step forward in reducing false alarms from security systems to the extent that ACPO now endorses compliant and registered companies for security systems.”

With so much invested by the police and the private security industry to improve the quality and reliability of alarm systems, it’s important that those procuring such a system are equally committed to quality. Investing in a solid infrastructure can improve the longevity and resilience of a system from start to finish.

To learn more about security systems, or to locate a supplier near you, visit: http://www.bsia.co.uk/security-installers or: http://www.bsia.co.uk/security-equipment-manufacturers

Leave a comment

Filed under IFSECGlobal.com News

Corps Security and Facewatch join forces to provide state-of-the-art crime and incident reporting

Corps Security has announced a new strategic partnership with Facewatch – the UK’s leading online crime reporting and intelligence sharing tool.

The Glasgow-based Corps Monitoring Centre (CMC) is now able to use state-of-the-art technology developed by the team at Facewatch which is transforming how CCTV is used by moving it into the digital world of online incident reporting.

Since launching in 2010, Facewatch has been enthusiastically received by businesses and law enforcement authorities alike. Signed protocols are already in place with ten UK police forces, and Facewatch hopes that every police force will have agreed in principle to use its technology by the end of 2014.

Its functionality has been recognised at the highest levels, and it also boasts the prestigious Secured by Design status bestowed by the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) and restricted to companies or products that have been successfully tested to the very highest standards.

Versatility of the system

Explaining the versatility of the system, Simon Gordon (founder and chairman at Facewatch) said: “Facewatch is suitable for use in a variety of high footfall areas such as pubs, clubs, shopping centres and other retail environments, sports stadiums, concert venues and even locations such as multi-storey car parks and garage forecourts.”

Since launching in 2010, Facewatch has been enthusiastically received by businesses and law enforcement authorities alike

Since launching in 2010, Facewatch has been enthusiastically received by businesses and law enforcement authorities alike

Gordon continued: “Crimes such as shoplifting, personal theft and vandalism can be reported instantly online. Not only does Facewatch make crime reporting more efficient, but it also helps improve the conviction rate and effectively deal with repeat offenders.”

Following an incident that’s reported to a CMC operative, Facewatch allows CCTV footage and suspect images to be automatically uploaded directly to the police, along with a full paperless witness statement. The victim is given a crime reference number at the same time. Once the incident has been reported it’s dealt with by the police who also provide feedback through the system.

Regular status reports are then forwarded to the business and victim by the system. In order to prevent crime, offender images and intelligence can be shared within an organisation, as well as chosen business networks and communities.

Using up-to-date technology

Widely acknowledged as the leading facility of its kind in the UK, this latest announcement is part of the CMC’s ongoing commitment to use the most up-to-date technology in providing customers with the highest quality service.

Simon Gordon: founder and chairman of Facewatch

Simon Gordon: founder and chairman of Facewatch

Eric Roberts, Corps Security’s CMC business development director, concluded: “We’re extremely pleased to be working with Facewatch as part of a collaborative effort to improve the standards of crime reporting and intelligence sharing. Our customers stand to benefit enormously from the availability of this innovative tool, as it can be successfully integrated into businesses of any size or complexity. The quality of the CCTV system is such that the evidence uploaded can help secure a prosecution.”

Corps Security can be contacted on (tel) 0800 0286 303 or via e-mail at: info@corpssecurity.co.uk

For further information on Facewatch telephone 020 7930 3225 or e-mail: simon.gordon@facewatch.co.uk

Leave a comment

Filed under IFSECGlobal.com News

Banknote Watch seminar programme and exhibition draws impressive police attendance

Police officers from across the country were given the chance to get close to the latest technology used in fighting Cash-in-Transit crime at a new event organised by crime reduction partnership Banknote Watch.

Attracting over 180 delegates from across 11 police forces, the seminar and exhibition brought police together with manufacturers of the unique taggant technology used to trace stolen banknotes back to the scene of a crime. A series of presentations gave police officers up-to-the-minute information about the applications of this technology and the procedures they can follow to identify and trace stolen cash.

Banknote Watch is a crime reduction partnership aimed at raising awareness among police and the general public that ‘a stained note is probably a stolen note’. Its supporters work closely with the police, financial institutions and the private security industry to ensure that criminals are less and less likely to profit from Cash-in-Transit crime.

Hosting the event alongside West Midlands Police and ACPO Secured by Design, Banknote Watch invited several exhibitors along to enable delegates from police forces to learn of the unique taggant technology used to trace stolen notes back to the scene of a crime.

Vital supporting evidence

Hilaire O’Shea is the national co-ordinator for Banknote Watch.

“When the police find stained banknotes,” explained O’Shea, “unique taggant technology can help them quickly and easily trace such notes back to the scene of a specific crime, which can in turn help them track down vital supporting evidence to help secure a conviction.”

O’Shea continued: “Each taggant has its own unique chemical code which shows up under ultraviolet light. This can attach itself to a criminal’s clothes or skin, or the inside of a car or home in which the stolen notes are stored. These solutions can remain traceable for years.”

On that basis, O’Shea and her colleagues at Banknote Watch wanted police officers to leave this event able to recognise the various solutions and understand the procedure they can follow to secure the evidence they need.

“Banknote Watch plays an important role in bringing police together with the manufacturers of these solutions,” added O’Shea, “as well as monitoring the positive impact this technology has on crime trends and reducing the risks faced by Cash-in-Transit couriers and financial institutions. We’re delighted that the event was so well-attended, and hope to follow up with similar events across the country and so help spread the word about unique taggants as far and wide as we can.”

Commitment, dedication and support from the security sector

Welcoming delegates to the event, ACC Gareth Cann of West Midlands Police said: “I have been hugely impressed with the commitment, dedication, support and effort from the [security] industry generally. Joint working and joint effort has been to everyone’s benefit.”

Meanwhile, Sergeant Andy Gregory of West Midlands Police Force’s Crime Reduction Unit, which hosted the event at its Tally Ho Training Centre in Birmingham, commented that the day had provided an “opportunity to share information with 11 police forces from around the country and across the region.”

Geoff Knupfer of exhibiting company Smartwater Technology (and current chairman of the Asset and Property Marking Section of the British Security Industry Association) added: “It has been a great conference. We’re absolutely delighted at the turnout and the interest being shown in some of the technology that’s available for countering and combating ATM attacks and cash attacks generally.”

Leave a comment

Filed under IFSECGlobal.com News

ACPO approves definition for business crime

ACPO and the National Business Crime Forum have announced that a definition of business crime has now been formerly agreed upon and adopted for the purposes of national crime recording.

It’s widely understood that a minimum of 15% of all crime is related to business crime. The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) and the National Business Crime Forum (NBCF) have now agreed on a definition for the term, which is as follows:

“Business crime is any criminal offence that is committed against a person or property
which is associated by the connection of that person or property to a business.”

This can be condensed to reflect the MOPAC definition of business crime given that it represents any crime in, around or against a business.

The definition is based on the perception of the victim at the time of reporting of the offence.

An impressive milestone

The definition represents an impressive milestone and the first very important step towards recognising all victims of business crime as well as ensuring, for the first time, that the impact of business crime can be accurately measured.

Paddy Tipping: APCC lead on business crime

Paddy Tipping: APCC lead on business crime

An official statement issued by the NBCF reads: “We hope a consequence of accurate recording will be to allow police resources to be more appropriately and effectively allocated and deployed. We recognise that there is still a big task ahead for policing to now train all police staff nationally to that definition and adapt force crime recording systems to allow for the recording of the crimes. We will be working with the college of policing in developing a package which recognises the issues that need to be overcome for its successful implementation.”

The statement continues: “This is a significant step forward in appreciating the impact of business crime on its victim. It’s important the police service and business sector continue to work together on a collaborative basis to ensure that this system continues to be most effective from both the victim’s and investigators’ points of view.”

On behalf of the wider business community, NBCF chairman Barrie Millett MSyI is in the process of developing a successful working relationship with the newly-appointed Association of Police and Crime Commissioners (APCC) business crime lead, Paddy Tipping, to enable the business community to come together as one collective voice and raise positive developments and concerns regarding business crime.

It’s envisaged that, as the lead co-ordinating organisation for the various business membership and representative bodies on a national basis, the NBCF will be able to work in partnership with Tipping to collaborate on addressing all forms of business crime.

Barrie Millett MSyI: chairman of the National Business Crime Forum

Barrie Millett MSyI: chairman of the National Business Crime Forum

“I’m truly pleased that we have been able to achieve an important part of this journey,” stated Barrie Millett, “and I will continue to drive forward a collaborative approach to addressing business crime on a national basis.”

The NBCF will continue to work collaboratively to ensure the successful implementation of the definition and will keep interested parties informed as each stage of the strategy is achieved.

Leave a comment

Filed under IFSECGlobal.com News

Victim Support celebrates 40 years of helping the victims of crime

Victim Support began celebrating 40 years of helping the victims of crime on New Year’s Day.

The occasion was marked with a feature which ran across the BBC, including BBC Breakfast and the News Channel. More than half a million people also heard about the anniversary through social media channels.

From humble beginnings as a local community project, Victim Support has grown into the world’s biggest charity for victims and witnesses. It now contacts more than one million victims of crime every year and helps more than 200,000 people giving evidence in court.

New analysis of Victim Support’s records shows an estimated 55,000 people have volunteered for the charity over the years, which has helped or contacted at least 30 million victims of crime.

Tributes to the organisation

Leading figures from the criminal justice system have paid tribute to the immense contribution made by Victim Support’s staff and volunteers over the last four decades.

Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders said: “We know that participation in the criminal justice system can be daunting for both victims and witnesses. Victim Support provides an essential service, not only by supporting victims of crime and helping witnesses give evidence in court through its volunteer-led Witness Service, but also in ensuring their voices are heard across the system.”

Alison Saunders: Director of Public Prosecutions

Alison Saunders: Director of Public Prosecutions

Saunders continued: “As DPP, I am committed to making victims’ experiences easier and better and the work of Victim Support is invaluable to the CPS’ efforts to achieve this. I am grateful to Victim Support for its role in representing the views of victims and witnesses, and we will continue to work closely with the organisation to ensure the CPS continues to improve the service we provide to those unfortunate enough to find themselves victims of crime.”

Sir Hugh Orde – President of the Association of Chief Police Officers – said: “Victim Support has made a vital and often unsung difference to the lives of so many victims and witnesses of crime over the past 40 years. The hard work and dedication of staff and volunteers, who give up their time for free, has helped thousands to negotiate what can be an extremely traumatic and confusing process.”

ACPO's president Sir Hugh Orde

ACPO’s president Sir Hugh Orde

ACPO’s leader continued: “Third sector partners like Victim Support make an invaluable contribution in improving the experiences of victims and witnesses and driving up their confidence in the criminal justice system as a whole. The police service will continue to work closely with Victim Support to ensure that victims and witnesses of crime receive the best possible help and support.”

Lifeline for more than one million victims

Tony Lloyd, Police and Crime Commissioner for Greater Manchester and chairman of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners, said: “Victim Support provides a lifeline to more than a million victims each year. Without volunteers willing to give up their own time to offer help and support to people at what is a very distressing time, Victim Support wouldn’t be able to provide this invaluable service. The organisations makes a real difference.”

Lloyd went on to state: “Organisations like Victim Support give victims a voice in the criminal justice system and it’s vital that we work with them to improve the service we provide to victims and witnesses and make sure their needs are at the centre of everything we do.”

Anti-knife crime campaigner Brooke Kinsella MBE, who became Victim Support’s Ambassador last year, said: “Victim Support was there for me and my family when we needed them most. I can honestly say that we couldn’t have got through the experience without them. The volunteer who helped us made such a difference to our lives with his kindness, patience and strength. So much more than a shoulder to cry on, he was truly a lifeline for us in the darkest of times.”

Brooke Kinsella MBE

Brooke Kinsella MBE

“I’m so proud to be an ambassador for Victim Support as the organisation celebrates its 40th Anniversary, and want to take this opportunity to thank all of their staff and volunteers, past and present – from the bottom of my heart – for the amazing job they have done and continue to do.”

Celebratory events in the pipeline

Victim Support will be acknowledging the vital contribution of volunteers and staff old and new by way of a series of celebratory events over the coming months.

The last 40 years has seen Victim Support make huge strides – developing from supporting victims of crimes such as theft, to very serious crimes, including homicide, rape and emerging crimes such as human trafficking.

It has also set up national services to support more than 200,000 victims and witnesses in every criminal court in England and Wales each year, as well as a national service to help families bereaved by homicide.

Some of the vital specialist work Victim Support now carries out includes anti-social behaviour and domestic violence projects, restorative justice programmes and preventative work in schools warning about the dangers of getting involved in gangs.

Javed Khan: CEO at Victim Support

Javed Khan: CEO at Victim Support

Victim Support’s CEO Javed Khan said: “We are told day in and day out that the work of our staff and volunteers makes a real difference to many, many people’s lives, and we are very proud of that. Much of our work wouldn’t be possible without our 5,600 dedicated volunteers, whose time alone is estimated to be worth £21 million. They are the backbone of Victim Support and I cannot thank them enough for their tireless efforts.”

Khan continued: “Over the last 40 years, more than 55,000 people have volunteered for the charity. It is one of the most rewarding contributions that anyone can make, and we are always welcoming new volunteers. If you want to help victims cope and recover then please get in touch with Victim Support.”

In conclusion, Khan stated: “There’s no better opportunity than this 40th Anniversary to offer our sincere thanks and gratitude to those who have made us what we are today, and continue to provide a world class service to victims and witnesses of crime. We are always mindful that the work we do needs to keep evolving, and we look forward to continuing to do all that we can to ensure victims’ needs are placed at the forefront of the criminal justice process.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized