Daily Archives: 31/10/2017

Home Office consults on using body-worn video for police interviews

New Home Office regulations will allow police to use body-worn video to record interviews with suspects under plans now being consulted on. Police can already use evidence captured by wearable cameras, but the changes will mean that, for the first time, they can be used for suspect interviews away from the police station setting.

It follows joint work between the Home Office and the police to help maximise time spent on the front line by police officers and reduce unnecessary trips to and from police stations.

Metropolitan Police Officers, London, UK

Minister for Policing and the Fire Service, Nick Hurd said: “Having met officers across England and Wales, I’ve seen how technology is bringing 21st Century solutions to age-old policing problems. I want our police officers to have access to the best possible equipment and to be able to use it to bring greater efficiency to front line policing. We will keep looking for ways in which to save time and work more effectively, and we’ll do everything we can to support forces as they adapt for the future.”

By the end of this year, 60,000 body-worn video cameras will have been deployed by police forces across England and Wales.

As part of the new regulations, the Home Office is also strengthening the protections in place for interviewees and will require all interviews with suspects to be recorded when a working audio device is available.

The new plans set out in full suspects’ rights and entitlements and also include a definition of vulnerability such that it’s perfectly clear when interviews must be conducted with independent support for the suspect from an appropriate adult and, if one is requested, a solicitor.

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Software development manager Tina Baker celebrates 13 years with TDSi

Tina Baker, software development manager at integrated security solutions manufacturer TDSi, is celebrating 13 years of service with the company. Having reached this impressive milestone, Baker has also been reflecting on the developments and evolution of the security software industry and what this could lead to in the future. 

“Since I joined TDSi there have been enormous changes in the security industry, especially in the software systems and applications connected to them,” urged Baker. “TDSi has been leading the move towards fully-integrated security software for a number of years now, and it’s gratifying to see the rest of the industry has followed suit as well.”

Baker began her career in security when she answered a job advert for a summer placement on display at Bournemouth University while nearing the end of a degree course in Software Engineering. “I knew that software would dominate many industries and wanted a career that would allow constant growth. I wanted to gain more experience developing software using different programming languages and TDSi offered me the opportunity that I was looking for.”

TinaBakerTDSi

TDSI’s Tina Baker: reflecting on 13 years with the Poole-based security solutions developer

Baker’s personal development has fittingly mirrored that of TDSi and the security industry it supplies. “TDSi has really nurtured my personal development, right from software programmer to development manager. At the same time, the industry has become far more integrated with building management systems which now commonly incorporate intruder alarms systems and CCTV as well as access control.”

A view of the future

While reflecting on the past and present, Baker also has an eye firmly fixed on the future and is clear on how she believes the security software sector will develop: “All the signs are that there will be continued and increased integration with building management systems, especially to comply with environmental legislation.”

Baker continued: “We will also see further biometric integration to heighten security and remove the need for ID cards. The market is also demanding more bi-directional integration, with security systems working even more closely with one another. More and more, we’re being asked for our SDKs so that other security companies can integrate our systems into theirs.”

Baker also has advice for young people looking for a career in security software development. “You need to enjoy continually learning new skills if you’re to keep up with the changes in technology. It’s also important to have a keen understanding of the close connection between physical access security and software security. Further systems integration means that the prevention of cyber attacks is essential.”

Focused and interested

When asked what has kept her focused on and interested in working for TDSi, Baker concluded: “The company champions professional development of its employees and, on a personal level, I really enjoy the interesting challenges that TDSi faces with ever-increasing integration needs. It’s a great company to work for, and I very much look forward to seeing what the future will bring in terms of technology and progress.”

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