Daily Archives: 06/12/2014

Siemens Building Technologies introduces latest version of Datacenter Clarity LC

Siemens Building Technologies has launched the latest version of Datacenter Clarity LC, an advanced software solution that harnesses a combination of real-time monitoring and Computational Fluid Dynamics in one single DCIM platform to enable data centre owners and managers to protect their data centre infrastructure with greater accuracy and efficiency.

The rapid growth in social networking, Internet usage, electronic banking, paperless storage and modern IT services such as virtualisation and cloud computing means the UK’s dependence on safe and secure data centres is paramount to the business continuity of corporations and infrastructures.

Higher levels of security are now required to ensure that data centre facilities are safe and the integrity of the data, buildings and assets involved is assured.

Datacenter Clarity LC is an advanced integrated software platform combining information from vital sub-systems that traditionally operate in isolation into a single, powerful solution that monitors energy and building management, physical security, fire safety, power and communications, zones and raised floors, racks, servers and data storage systems as well as switches and routers.

Importantly, this solution bridges the gap between IT and facilities’ processes, enabling both parties to manage assets and workflows.

The outcome is a complete, real-time dashboard that can represent assets in a state-of-the-art 3D model and deliver a fully-automated and smart data centre environment with resultant cost and energy savings and improvements in manpower resources.

Rapid growth in social networking, Internet usage, electronic banking, paperless storage and modern IT services such as virtualisation and cloud computing means the UK’s dependence on safe and secure data centres is paramount to the business continuity of corporations and infrastructures

Rapid growth in social networking, Internet usage, electronic banking, paperless storage and modern IT services such as virtualisation and cloud computing means the UK’s dependence on safe and secure data centres is paramount to the business continuity of corporations and infrastructures

Assessment of critical situations

The data centre market is increasingly demanding technology that will assess critical situations, distribute information, co-ordinate workflows, maximise uptime and manage resources. Siemens has responded by delivering a solution that guarantees a scalable, secure, seamless, resilient and intelligent environment.

The benefits that Datacenter Clarity LC brings include significant reductions in energy consumption thanks to the precision monitoring of data from multiple systems, a wide range of management tools for improved capacity planning, forecasting and simulation, increased asset availability to enable business continuity and the realisation of advanced intelligence and analytics.

The software delivers real-time energy management in server rooms due to its ability to harness Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis technology combined with real-time environmental monitoring to realise a complete set of capabilities for cooling management. Datacenter Clarity LC continuously monitors the air temperature in server rooms and instantly identifies any potential problem areas such as hot spots.

In addition to real-time environmental monitoring, Datacenter Clarity LC also provides predictive capabilities in a virtual 3D data centre model before any equipment is actually purchased by the end user. Having both real-time environmental monitoring and CFD capabilities within a single DCIM platform is unique to Siemens and enables a faster return on investment for the customer.

Multi-dimensional dashboards and KPIs

Multi-dimensional dashboards and Key Performance Indicators provide second-by-second information on data centre performance. Real-time monitoring – as well as alarm and critical event notification with escalation – enable immediate response and corrective action to ensure the protection of sensitive material and irreplaceable data.

Datacenter Clarity LC now includes a browser-based 3D application. This affords an intuitive and portable solution that facilitates deployment, usage and accessibility with no local footprint. This new web client interface is cross-browser and cross-device compatible to include tablets for maximum convenience and ease of use.

Phiippe Heim, portfolio manager for Siemens’ data centre team, commented: “Datacenter Clarity LC will be at the heart of the next generation of data centres. Currently, the major challenge for this critical environment is to reduce costs while improving operations. This new development from Siemens ensures the full protection of assets, better consolidation across all essential services and improved energy consumption to achieve green credentials.”

Datacenter Clarity LC is based on Siemens’ tried-and-tested Product Lifecycle Management software which has a proven 20-year pedigree. Operating in critical environments across the globe, over nine million PLM licenses have been issued to date.

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Reductions in false alarms and police response times revealed at CSL Insurers’ Forum

CSL DualCom’s seventh annual Insurers’ Forum witnessed an excellent turnout of over 50 senior professionals and consultants from leading insurance companies who gathered at Vodafone’s headquarters in Newbury.

Ray Kay, head of Vodafone M2M UK, kicked off the discussions by outlining Vodafone’s vision that 50% of organisations will have adopted M2M by 2015. Kay also outlined the substantial investments being made in 2G, 3G and 4G networks in order to ensure perfect voice calls, competitive 3G coverage and 98% indoor 4G coverage by the end of next year.

National Security Inspectorate (NSI) CEO Richard Jenkins then described his organisation’s focus on raising standards in the industry and how becoming an NSI approved company directly impacts on this. The NSI believes that robust services, tougher regulation and police response measures are all key contributing factors.

CSL DualCom’s group managing director Simon Banks also touched on standards and reviewed a specific example of how CSL DualCom takes responsibility for the entire journey of an alarm signal.

Future proofing and carbon footprint reduction via Remote Servicing and Diagnostics (RSD) was touched upon, a message mirrored by Mark Emery from Swift Fire & Security. Emery explained how the additional benefit of reduced engineering costs offered by RSD is a great asset to the company’s engineering armoury.

The NSI's CEO Richard Jenkins addresses the audience at Vodafone's hq

The NSI’s CEO Richard Jenkins addresses the audience at Vodafone’s hq

Ed Barge of EMCS presented an overall picture of the current trends from the Alarm Receiving Centre perspective, noting a particular increase in upgrades from bells-only or Digicom systems to monitored single path solutions very much in keeping with the day’s theme of raising standards.

Geoff Wright of AIG then took the audience through a Case Study focused on a £25 million loss at a large warehouse. In the example given, insufficient management programmes caused delays in calling the fire brigade despite the correct installation of fire detection, sprinkler and security systems.

Reducing risks to the public and property

Pat Allen – chairman of the Fire and Security Association – chose to list measures that can be taken to reduce unwanted alarms. Allen advised that monitored fire systems allow for early detection which reduces risk to the public and property (as well as fire-fighters themselves).

ACPO’s Ken Meanwell highlighted the tremendous reduction in false intruder alarms in recent times which is largely thanks to advances in alarm signalling coupled with more stringent penalties for repeat false alarms. This greater efficiency has also allowed for a reduction in police response times.

The CSL DualCom Insurers' Forum proved popular with delegates

The CSL DualCom Insurers’ Forum proved popular with delegates

Mike Jay – insurance expert and convenor of the RISCAuthority Security Group at the Fire Protection Association – concurred with these findings as his organisation has witnessed a reduction in claims and criminality due to the success of security companies and the police service in increasing the risks involved for criminals.

The BSIA’s technical director Alex Carmichael considered the discrepancies that can arise between test houses for European third party specifications and provided an update on both European and international standards.

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True financial cost of IT failures to businesses revealed in KPMG report

A new report by KPMG, entitled: ‘The Technology Risk Radar’, tracks the major technology incidents faced by businesses and public sector bodies and reveals the cost of IT failures over the last 12 months.

Organisations are struggling to stay on top of costly technology risks. The report finds that, on average, employers had to pay an unplanned £410,000 for each technology-related problem they faced. The report also reveals that an average of 776,000 individuals have been affected – and around 4 million bank and credit card accounts compromised – by each IT failure.

Incidents caused by ‘avoidable’ problems such as software coding errors or failed IT changes accounted for over 50% of the IT incidents reported over the past year. Of these, 7.3% of reported events were the fault of human error – a figure which shows that basic investments in training are being ignored at the employers’ cost.

Further, while data loss-related incidents continued to be a major problem for all industries, a significant number of those (16%) were unintentional.

‘The Technology Risk Radar’ reveals that customer-facing organisations are quickly realising the true cost of systems failures if they’re left unchecked. For instance, a utility company faced a £10 million fine when technical glitches during the transfer to a new billing system meant customers did not receive bills for months and were then sent inaccurate payment demands or refused prompt refunds when errors were eventually acknowledged.

Organisations are struggling to stay on top of costly technology risks

Organisations are struggling to stay on top of costly technology risks

Detrimental to business relationships

Commenting on the findings of ‘The Technology Risk Radar’ report, Jon Dowie – partner in KPMG’s Technology Risk practice – said: “Technology is no longer a function within a business which operates largely in isolation. Rather, it’s at the heart of everything a company does. When it goes wrong, it affects an organisation’s bottom line, its relationship with customers and its wider reputation.”

Dowie added: “Investment in technology will continue to rise as businesses embrace digital and other opportunities, but this needs to be matched by investments in assessing, managing and monitoring the associated risks. At a time when even our regulators have shown themselves to be vulnerable to technology risk, absolutely no-one can afford to be complacent.”

With financial services under enormous pressure to maintain highly secure technology infrastructure, KPMG predicts IT complexity will continue to be the single biggest risk to financial services organisations in the coming year. This is closely followed by ineffective governance, risk and non-compliance with regulations. Security risks – such as cyber crime and unauthorised access – are rated fifth.

Dowie concluded: “With ever greater complexity in IT systems, not to mention the challenge of implementing IT transformational change, companies are running to stand still in managing their IT risks. The cost of failure is all too clear. It’s crucial for both public and private sector organisations to understand the risks associated with IT and how they can be managed, mitigated and avoided.”

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“RIPA not fit for purpose” states Home Affairs Select Committee

The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) 2000 – the legislation governing communications data – “needs a complete overhaul”. That’s the conclusion of the latest Home Affairs Select Committee report.

The Home Affairs Select Committee acknowledges the operational need for secrecy both during investigations and afterwards (so that investigative techniques more broadly are not disclosed). However, there has to be proper oversight and scrutiny. The Committee recommends that the Home Office uses the current review of the RIPA Code to ensure that law enforcement agencies discharge their RIPA powers properly.

The Committee noted that the Rt Hon Sir Paul Kennedy, the Interception of Communications Commissioner, launched an inquiry in October 2014 to determine whether the acquisition of communications data had been used to identify journalistic sources. He wrote to all chief constables and directed them, under Section 58(1) of RIPA, to provide him with details of all investigations that had used powers under Chapter 2 of Part I of RIPA to acquire communications data to identify journalistic sources. His office will undertake a full inquiry into these matters, report the findings to the Prime Minister and then publish them.

The Committee believes all local police forces must communicate openly and efficiently with the Commissioner regarding the information they give him about their work. The Committee considers that IOCCO should be given further resources to carry out its job in an effective and timely manner, particularly in respect of its inquiry into the use of RIPA powers regarding journalistic sources.

Keith Vaz MP: chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee

Keith Vaz MP: chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee

Updated Code of Practice

The Communications Data Code of Practice was drafted eight years ago and, unlike the interception or the Surveillance Code which were recently updated, contains no advice on dealing with professions that handle privileged information nor any guidelines on the use of confidential helplines.

The Committee notes Sir Paul’s recommendation to the Home Office concerning the need for improvements to the statistical requirements in the RIPA Code of Practice. It’s vital that the statistical requirements are enhanced so that the public can be better informed about the use which public authorities make of communications data.

On 15 October this year, the Home Secretary Theresa May announced that the Home Office was conducting a review of the use of RIPA in response to concerns over its deployment to access journalists’ phone records. The Government has stated that a revised Code will be published in draft form “this autumn” and will be subject to public consultation. With only 26 days until the New Year, the Home Affairs Select Committee has stated that the Home Office has failed to meet its own timetable.

Keith Vaz MP, chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee, said: “RIPA is not fit for purpose. We were astonished that law enforcement agencies failed to routinely record the professions of individuals who have had their communications data accessed under the legislation. Using RIPA to access the telephone records of journalists is wrong and this practice must cease. The inevitable consequence is that this deters whistle-blowers from coming forward.”

Vaz continued: “The recording of information under RIPA is lamentably poor. The whole process appears secretive and disorganised without proper monitoring of what is being destroyed and what’s being retained. We’re concerned that the level of secrecy surrounding the use of RIPA allows investigating authorities to engage in acts which would be unacceptable in a democracy with inadequate oversight.”

Home Secretary Theresa May

Home Secretary Theresa May

In conclusion, Vaz explained: “The Home Office has failed to publish its review within its own timetable, and not for the first time. It should hold a full public consultation on an amended RIPA Code of Practice. Any updated advice should contain special provisions for dealing with privileged information such as journalistic material and material subject to legal privilege. It’s vital that the Home Office uses the current review of the RIPA Code to ensure that law enforcement agencies discharge their RIPA powers properly.”

Response from Liberty and Big Brother Watch

Responding to the Home Affairs Select Committee’s report on RIPA, Isabella Sankey – director of policy for Liberty – said: “The secret use of RIPA to investigate journalists’ sources will chill anyone who values free speech and a free press, but what’s really disturbing is that the abuses detailed in this damning report are the tip of the iceberg. Records about your phone calls and e-mails build up an incredibly detailed data picture of every single one of us – who we are, where we go and what we do.”

Sankey added: “We urgently need safeguards to stop this valuable data being accessed without judicial warrant. What we’re getting is the Government handing itself even more powers to snoop in the form of the ill-targeted Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.”

Emma Carr, director of Big Brother Watch, said: “When a senior Parliamentary Committee says that the current legislation is not fit for purpose then this simply cannot be ignored. It’s now abundantly clear that the law is out of date, the oversight is weak and the recording of how the powers enshrined in RIPA are used is patchy at best. The public is right to expect better.”

Emma Carr: leader of Big Brother Watch

Emma Carr: director of Big Brother Watch

Carr continued: “The conclusion of the Committee that the level of secrecy surrounding the use of these powers is permitting investigations that are deemed ‘unacceptable in a democracy’ should make the defenders of these powers sit up and take notice. At present, the inadequacy and inconsistency of the records being kept by public authorities regarding the use of these powers is woefully inadequate. New laws would not be required to correct this.”

Big Brother Watch’s director said: “While this report concentrates on targeting journalists, it’s important to remember that thousands of members of the public have also been snooped on, with little opportunity for redress. If the police fail to use the existing powers correctly then it’s completely irresponsible for the Home Office to be planning on increasing those powers. Failure by the Government to address these serious points means we can already know that there will be many more innocent members of the public who will be wrongly spied on and accused. This is intolerable.”

Watch a video of Emma Carr being interviewed on this issue by BBC News:

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BAFE supports Scottish Fire and Rescue Service research on causes of false fire alarms

A multi-agency partnership is set to study the causes of false alarms from fire alarm systems in buildings and their frequency of occurrence which will result in proposed solutions being developed to prevent recurrences in the future.

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service is teaming up with partners from the Association of British Insurers (ABI), British Approvals for Fire Equipment (BAFE), the Building Research Establishment (BRE), the CBRE Group, CS Todd & Associates, the Fire Industry Association (FIA) and Glasgow City Council to undertake this groundbreaking research.

Due to the universal nature of fire alarm systems, the outcomes of this work will have the potential to impact within the UK and across Europe, including the possibility of influencing future standards and Codes of Practice in respect of automatic fire alarm systems.

Fire-fighters throughout the UK are frequently called to attend incidents resulting from false alarms generated by fire detection and suppression systems usually installed within commercial premises and often monitored remotely. The cost of these unwanted false alarm signals to both businesses and Fire and Rescue Services is estimated to be around £1 billion per annum.

Assistant Chief Officer (ACO) Lewis Ramsay, director of prevention and protection at the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, said: “Unwanted false alarm signals are a significant issue for Fire and Rescue Services so it’s important we join with our partners to see them reduced. The scale of the problem is clear. Over the past three years Scotland’s fire-fighters have been called to in excess of 100,000 such incidents, which equates to over 40% of all the incidents we attend. Not only is there a substantial financial cost attached to this but attending needless incidents also means fire-fighters and resources are taken away from their communities.”

Ramsay outlined: “In a real emergency every second counts. The time taken for fire-fighters to travel to a house fire, a road traffic collision or any other incident can be absolutely crucial when it comes to saving the lives of people in danger. By working together with our partners we can gather information on the common causes of false alarms and identify approaches to reduce the number that occur.”

Each unwanted false alarm signal costs businesses around £2,900 with an estimated £300 burden also falling on the Fire and Rescue Service.

A multi-agency partnership is to study the causes of false alarms from fire alarm systems in buildings and their frequency of occurrence

A multi-agency partnership is to study the causes of false alarms from fire alarm systems in buildings and their frequency of occurrence

Benefits of automatic fire alarm systems

As well as researching false alarms, the project will also promote the benefits of having automatic fire alarm systems installed in buildings. This will be done by studying fires where systems have detected them and raised the alarm. Such occurrences will be used to highlight the benefits of automatic fire alarm systems in alerting people to safely evacuate buildings and summoning assistance from the Fire and Rescue Service such that fires can be tackled in their early stages, thereby reducing the damage caused.

The project will involve two Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Watch Managers seconded from Glasgow’s group of Fire Safety Enforcement Officers who will work alongside a fire alarm industry expert to gather live intelligence on incidents that involve the actuation of fire alarm systems. In this regard the project is unique, as previous studies have involved the use of historical data.

Glasgow was chosen as the focus area for the project as the city is considered to be geographically suitable and has a sufficient number of incidents to enable data to be captured relatively quickly.

ACO Ramsay continued: “This is a joint project overseen by an executive sub-group of the Business Engagement Forum, bringing us together with Glasgow City Council and other partners including representatives from the insurance and fire protection industries. Our designated officers and the researcher will attend incidents in the city to gather data and gain an accurate understanding of false alarm causes which is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent recurrences. Where appropriate, the team will also attend incidents where fire alarms have detected an actual fire. This will enhance the understanding of potential consequences had the alarm system not been in place, in turn demonstrating where such systems do provide value.”

When the team has completed its research a formal report will be produced by the Business Engagement Forum sub-group. It’s expected to include recommendations useful to businesses, the fire protection industry, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service and other Fire and Rescue Services as they develop practical measures to reduce the problem caused by unwanted false alarm signals.

ACO Ramsay added: “The project involves the same partnership that helped develop the new Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Unwanted False Alarm Signals Policy which will replace the eight different policies used by the antecedent services. Under this single nationwide approach, fire-fighters across Scotland will engage with duty holders and advocate a multi-stage action plan in response to the actuation of a fire alarm system.”

The cost of unwanted false fire alarm signals to both businesses and Fire and Rescue Services is estimated to be around £1 billion per year

The cost of unwanted false fire alarm signals to both businesses and Fire and Rescue Services is estimated to be around £1 billion per year

Ramsay asserted: “Cutting the number of unwanted false alarm signal incidents will reduce financial costs to ourselves and businesses, and also cut the demand placed on a community’s fire and rescue resources. One clear and immediate benefit will be to reduce the number of times our appliances have to travel under blue lights, which will lower the risk to our crews and other road users. We want to build on this work, and the research project will help Fire and Rescue Services and businesses to tackle the issue.”

Main objectives to be addressed

There’s no fixed timescale for the research to be completed, although it’s anticipated that the project may take around a year to produce a report.

The main objectives are:
• The collation of comprehensive data in relation to unwanted false alarm signal incidents
• Identification of the common causes of unwanted false alarm signal incidents, including appropriate classification
• Improved engagement between the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, the fire industry and businesses in relation to unwanted false alarm signal incidents
• A reduction in the volume of unwanted false alarm signal incidents within the Glasgow city area
• Provision of intelligence to help reduce the volume of unwanted false alarm signal incidents across Scotland

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service’s Unwanted Fire Alarm Signal Policy ‘go live’ date was 1 December 2014. It replaces existing policies which varied between the eight Fire and Rescue Services that operated in Scotland prior to April 2013.

A previous study undertaken by the BRE entitled: ‘The Causes of False Fire Alarms in Buildings’ is available at: http://www.bre.co.uk/podpage.jsp?id=1752

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IHS Research Note: ‘What does the future hold in store for Access Control as a Service?’

In the latest Research Note from IHS, Blake Kozak – senior analyst for security and building technologies – discusses the future of hosted and managed access control solutions.

How will the electronic access control industry embrace the cloud in the coming years? Will Governments see the value in using commercial cloud resources? Will Governments create standards and Best Practice to ease restrictions on cloud storage across borders? Will operational expenditure (opex) options open the door to more SMB adoption? With the cost per door coming down for access control solutions, will the market opportunity for Access Control-as-a-Service (ACaaS) be negatively impacted?

Many questions still exist for the providers and future adopters of ACaaS. However, IHS expects ACaaS to thrive over the long term. The global market size is expected to exceed $530 million by 2018 and $1.8 billion by 2025.

Driving this growth will be the global adoption of cloud and virtualisation in other sectors not related to security in addition to the services associated with ACaaS.

During the first half of 2014, IHS calculated that multi-tenant data centre sales grew by 12.7% on a global basis. As it relates to access control, IHS expects the commoditisation of access control hardware to draw more attention to value-added services and ROI. As a result, channel partners and providers who are more specialised in IT, integration and mobility (ie remote connectivity) could see more growth in the long term.

How will the electronic access control industry embrace the cloud in the coming years?

How will the electronic access control industry embrace the cloud in the coming years?

Change of mindset

Although the access control industry is inherently slow to adopt new technologies, end user adoption and awareness is only half the battle.

Unless they were ‘born in the cloud’, most integrators and installers must change a long-standing mindset of selling boxes and components and instead begin selling services, features and concepts.

Additionally, they must know the IT side of the business and be able to answer questions regarding redundancy, certifications, hacking and other buzz phrases associated with cloud-based services and ACaaS.

Although it’s a difficult process, the access control industry is already moving in this direction. Starwood Hotels offer mobile keys over Bluetooth and banking headquarters have now installed wireless locks.

For the questions listed above, the short answer is: ‘Yes’ and the access control industry will continue to embrace the cloud, albeit at a much slower pace than originally projected.

Today, most providers of ACaaS do not specialise in ACaaS only. As a result, ACaaS remains a small portion of most monitoring stations and integrators’ overall business. One reason why these channel partners do not specialise in only ACaaS is because it wouldn’t be profitable, at least not at the beginning. With the ACaaS model, a large number of accounts is critical so many channel partners are even holding off on providing managed services until more accounts are added.

Additionally, most of these providers do not have a ‘true cloud’ model. The majority rely on only a handful of servers to provide services. Until end users begin requesting and using ACaaS in their droves and integration with video and other services transpires, IHS expects that this non-true cloud model will suffice for most security managers.

Furthermore, IHS expects that Governments will continue to embrace the cloud, but they must find ways to manage resource and security (which is often a lengthy and expensive venture). The US Government, for example, has already started travelling down this path with milCloud and other initiatives. For the EU, the European Cloud Partnership (Trusted Cloud) has acted as a starting point and blueprint for the future.

Flexibility of the offering

Overall, IHS expects ACaaS to continue to grow and expand due to the flexibility of the offering not provided by on-site solutions. For example, end users can manage the entire solution themselves while at the same time outsourcing the infrastructure maintenance. Alternatively, they can pay an additional fee and the entire solution will be managed for them – from monitoring and report printing through to badging and granting access rights, etc.

A further option is that the user chooses to only outsource certain tasks and they can lump a portion (in some cases 100%) of the hardware cost into a monthly fee, in turn reducing the barrier to entry.

Hindering growth is the continued decline in the cost per door (hardware), privacy concerns, web-based panels, custom billing, hacking, cross-border privacy agreements and market education.

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Servest Group launches dedicated Future Leader Programme

Facilities management solutions provider Servest Group has launched a development programme specifically designed to progress the careers of high-performing team members and attract the brightest graduates into the organisation.

Under the scheme, which begins in March next year, four graduates and four existing employees will embark on a two-year programme which includes time spent in each of Servest’s main divisions: Security, Building Maintenance, Catering, Cleaning and Central Services (such as Human Resources, Finance and Sales and Marketing).

In addition to learning practical skills in these areas, the participants will study management skills and be backed up by way of the Institute of Leadership and Management’s qualification in leadership (which will be run internally).

At the end of the programme, participants will join the most relevant division in a management role or look to study further qualifications if they wish to join functions such as Finance.

“The scheme demonstrates our commitment both to attracting the best people into FM and also developing our own talented team members to ensure a leadership pipeline,” said Rob Legge, Group CEO for the UK and Europe at Servest. “Both qualifications and experience are important in FM and, by bringing existing team members and new graduates into the scheme, we’re absolutely reflecting that need.”

Rob Legge: CEO for the UK and Europe at Servest Group

Rob Legge: CEO for the UK and Europe at Servest Group

The Future Leader Programme will be marketed internally, on national job boards, through social media and at universities near to Servest’s main office locations in Bury St Edmunds, Birmingham, Leeds, Hertfordshire and London.

Candidates need to demonstrate leadership potential, have top-notch communication skills and “be a good fit for the fast-paced, entrepreneurial culture” of Servest.

Graduates must have at least a 2:1, but their degree specialism doesn’t have to be in a relevant discipline.

The recruitment process will involve an initial application, telephone interview and profiling with a selected few being invited to an Assessment Centre.

Transparent and innovative partnership approach

Servest Group employs more than 16,000 people over 6,000 sites across the UK, with the company priding itself on a transparent and innovative partnership approach.

The organisation self-delivers value-for-money bespoke solutions to clients in the retail, leisure, public, commercial, construction, transport and logistics sectors.

Servest is 73% owned by Servest South Africa with the remainder of the business owned by the UK management team.

The company takes an active role in the facilities management community as members of – among others – the British Institute of Facilities Management, the Facilities Management Association and the Confederation of British Industry.

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