Dr Peter Speight CSyP wins prestigious CIR Risk Manager of the Year Award 2014

The UK Chapter of ASIS International has congratulated Dr Peter Speight CSyP – director of security risk management and consultancy services at Securitas in the UK – for winning the prestigious CIR Risk Manager of the Year Award 2014.

Now in their fifth year, the CIR magazine Risk Management Awards are specifically designed to recognise those individuals, organisations and teams that have significantly added to the understanding and practice of risk management. Judged by an independent panel of experts, the awards provide an opportunity for organisations and individuals to showcase their best products, projects and people.

The Risk Manager of the Year Award honours outstanding performance by a risk management individual deemed by the Judges to have accomplished most in the past 12 months in terms of reinforcing their organisation’s risk management framework, inspiring their team and offering creative thinking to the risk management community as a whole.

Risk professionals operational in organisations ranging from FTSE 100 blue chip concerns through to small and medium-sized enterprises are invited to enter submissions for this category.

Dr Peter Speight CSyP (centre) receives the Risk Manager of the Award 2014

Dr Peter Speight CSyP (centre) receives the Risk Manager of the Award 2014

The winner in 2014 is Dr Peter Speight CSyP, director of security risk management at Securitas UK (a role which Speight began back in November 2010) and author of the hugely popular book ‘Why Security Fails’ (more of which anon). Speight’s remit at Securitas focuses on strategic, tactical and operational enterprise risk management.

Prior to this, Speight served as director of security risk management with Reliance Security Services and (from February 2008 through until April 2009) as head of security consultancy with Perpetuity Risk and Consultancy International, during which time he concentrated on both strategic and operational security consulting.

In previous times Speight has also held end user roles, including a spell as group security manager for Allied Colloids and head of security operations at the BBC, where he worked from September 1999 to May 2000.

Peter’s a regular contributor to the security world’s leading journals and frequently speaks on risk issues as part of the sector’s many and varied conference programmes, among them that devised for IFSEC International.

Dr Speight is a long-time ASIS International UK member and, subject to election at next month’s AGM, will be joining the ASIS UK Leadership team as Chapter Secretary for 2015.

ASIS UK Chapter vice-chairman Mike Hurst stated: “Peter has been a champion of Enterprise Security Risk Management for many years now, and we’re absolutely delighted that his work has been recognised. ASIS International has produced several guidelines and standards on the subject of risk management so it’s fitting that an ASIS UK member is this year’s award recipient.”

Why Security Fails

Published in July 2012, Dr Peter Speight’s excellent book entitled ‘Why Security Fails’ examines a proposition that it’s possible to determine why security falls down within organisations.

There’s a detailed examination of the matrix containing security manpower, physical security assets, electronic systems and procedures. The operational effectiveness of these four distinct security facets is often not capable of critical assessment by the very organisation that’s paying for these assets and services. Therefore, it has been necessary to both determine and evidence a variety of security failures and, ultimately, contrast these sample conditions with examples of organisational security successfully achieving a range of targeted objectives (to the complete understanding and budgetary capability of the target organisation).

These contrasting situations are illustrated within the book which presents a detailed study of a multinational manufacturing organisation and the re-alignment of its security strategy following a comprehensive risk assessment and security audit.

The book also posits that it’s unlikely such security strategies can be effective unless based on a clear understanding of the threats, hazards and risks to which a given organisation may be subjected.

The issue of risk and security auditing is a key feature of ‘Why Security Fails’, as is the requirement to emphasise that the success of a security strategy (which would follow on from the assessment of risk and vulnerability) is not only underpinned by the accuracy of these processes, but also a clear understanding of the specific corporate culture, organisational security awareness and fiscal imperatives at play.

‘Why Security Fails’ also examines the role of risk management in the planning of crisis, continuity and safety issues, again from the perspective of contrasting the success of such planning when measured against the management of risks and the operationally assessed needs linked to the aforementioned four elements of security.

*To order your copy of ‘Why Security Fails’ contact: Protection Publications, 12B Wellgate Centre, Ossett, Wakefield WF5 8NS (telephone: 01924 266016)

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